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GreatSchools Rating

Shelburne Community School

Public | PK-8

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted June 4, 2014

My son attended school in Florida, and he never made any gains (has a learning disability). We moved to Vermont, and the gains he has made at SCS is astounding! The teachers, principle, para-educator, and other parents and faculty have grown long-lasting relationships with my son and us as well. I love the community atmosphere they offer, and the fact that they teach kids how to look out for each other as well as living an active and healthy life-style. The teachers are good about responding to any email's I send promptly (as well as much of the staff). They are also good at sending my any curriculum my son needs to know so I can help him at home as well as them helping him at school. I enjoy the mandatory parent/teacher conferences (two a year), as they help me keep up with the progress my son is doing (as well as the emails). I also like how they set up their IEP's for my son. We fight to keep our son in this school and tell others our opinions of this school. I do not think there is any school better!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

There are minor issues mainly due to decreased funding. Class sizes are small (Average is ~20 students in elementary classes with one teacher, a para educator, and full time one-on-one aids for those studentheming special needs), the arts have been left intact (art and music each 2x per week with chorus and band electives), and students continue to perform well above the national average on standardized tests. Grade levels are grouped into teams where the administration assigns each student according to accademic and personality strengths and weaknesses based on information gathered from teachers, parents and the students themselves. Parent control within this placement is discouraged, however, any problems are dealt with promptly (inside and outside of the classroom including bullying). Shelburne is a pretty well-to-do community (less than 10% free and reduced lunches) and parents can come accross as entitled and demanding. All in all, this is a very good school. I will update as my fifth grader enters middle school next year. PTO is wound a bit tight, and although that can be intimidating for new members, they are effective and manage to get a lot done.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2013

The changes in administration - new middle school and new elementary level principals - have been extremely detrimental to the school. While the school had challenges prior to these changes, those challenges are now exacerbated and there are many more. Chief among them is the absolute unwillingness of the administration to listen to and address serious concerns - academic, social, etc. While there are some excellent teachers at SCS, there are some extremely poor teachers as well, and no accountability or efforts to remedy those situations. Academic rigor depends on the teacher, not the curriculum, which is problematic. Limited resources and opportunities for the majority of kids. Very sports-centric. Board not responsive, nor is superintendent. FAR too extensive use of "para-educators"; they have a lot of power and no background/education - kids are terrified of them. And while everyone sings the praises of the community of involved parents, the reality is the PTO presidents are "tenured", the same parents do everything and do not welcome outside input.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2013

I would just like to point out that the school has had a change of administration. There are very high reviews of SCS prior to the hiring of the new middle school administrator (principal) in 2010. Draw any conclusion you would like. I just think it is an important fact for all to be aware of and perhaps something will change!


Posted October 5, 2012

Don't be fooled, if you are well connected or have a relative on the school board you will get a good teacher. If however, you are not, you will find you child crammed into a classroom with 40% higher student to teacher ratio, while the board members' child will have your child s teacher and a low ratio. The administration cares more about their own jobs then the lives of the children they are destroying. If you would like your child to succeed, don't go here. There is not a second language until too late, no science and no history, as it does not fit in with their indoctrination.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2012

Don't be fooled. We talk about how great SCS is but that's relative to Vermont's other mediocre schools. Teachers mean well but are fundamentally mediocre and fail to challenge kids with rigorous curriculum or standards. There's significant diversion of resources to children with special needs or behavioral issues instead of core students. The facilities are poor and there's limited supervision of children during lunch and 'in between' times. Administration seems confused about pedagogy (e.g. teams, multi-age classes). Parents are involved and there's a great community feel to the school. But at what cost? We can't afford another option for our three kids, two of which are already at SCS. But I see how far behind my 4th grader is from kids of his ability in CT/MA/NY. We are fooling ourselves that all the property tax money is going to educate our children. I believe in the progressive value of public education, and I want to support my local school, but I cannot keep denying that my kids are just getting lost at SCS. I want them to be challenged.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2012

First the outside "breeze way" the Pre-K - 3rd graders have to pass through to get to music, lunch, art and PE throughout the day (at times alone). They expect the younger kids to go outside and then back inside to get everywhere. My son hates it! Not to mention the lack of security. When a group of parents brought up the security issue they put up a security camera. Also, they have 8 different after school activities FREE to the 6-8th graders to be involved in (cooking, dance, etc) besides the sports & a free late bus. But nothing for K-5. K-5 needs to pay for some reason, & I have been informed that is not going to change. They don't seem very open to new ideas unfortunately and very stuck in their ways. I am happy about an online program my child is using Lexia Learning and Fast Math. The teacher can see when you log on at home & follow your progress. My son does love the music teacher & the art teacher does a great job exposing them to a variety of types of art. I don't like the inconsistency between teachers in the same grade. Our teacher is very good, but doesn't believe in homework, while others are sending home book reports & other work, & they're in the same grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2010

The school, particularly at the middle school level, has really gone downhill in the last two years. Very little accountability, no academic challenge. The most troubling thing though, is the significant increase in the number of very serious bullying incidents. These situations have not been handled effectively and thus continue. The bottom line is, if students don't feel safe and secure very little learning can take place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

The faculty and principals are outstanding. They create a safe and healthy environment for the students. Respect for their fellow classmates is taught at all levels.


Posted November 13, 2007

The 'community' in the name of the school is more than an aspiration -- it's the way the school culture is organized among faculty, administration, and families. Parental involvement is very high, and students are organized into academic 'teams' that build long-term relationships across grades. Older students can sign up for in-school community service that includes mentoring younger students or working with kids with special needs. Faculty members seek out ongoing e-mail input and feedback from parents and act as sponsors for a wide range of academic and extracurricular activities. It's a very intentional community that surrounds our kids with eyes and ears, and with hands to help, and teachers are strongly focused on academic performance. Our family has had a great experience at SCS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2007

We are parents of a bright but behaviorally challenged kid. The staff and teachers at SCS have been just outstanding at working with us as a team to help our child. They respect our insight and ideas and make useful and compassionate suggestions. We've been so impressed by the love our child has experienced there. We're sorry to have to leave! The music also seems to be great, our child loved music class. Lots of extracurricular activities and parent involvement, a real emphasis on families. The school is very much a part of the community. It's a great school and the principal we worked with, Allegra Miller, is outstanding.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

80 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
76%

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
81%
Reading

79 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
87%

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
82%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

78 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
75%

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
69%
Reading

78 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
80%

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 47% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
66%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

75 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
80%

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
85%
Reading

75 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
82%

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%
Writing

75 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
69%

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
69%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

95 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
80%

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
79%
Reading

94 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
87%

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
79%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
80%

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
84%
Reading

69 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
83%

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
84%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

77 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
89%

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
80%
Reading

77 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
87%

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 32% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
45%
Writing

77 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
72%

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
75%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female82%
Male68%
Blackn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant76%

Reading

All Students87%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female81%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant75%

Reading

All Students80%
Female86%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female80%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%

Reading

All Students82%
Female82%
Male82%
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant82%

Writing

All Students69%
Female75%
Male62%
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant69%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female84%
Male76%
Blackn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged62%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%

Reading

All Students87%
Female94%
Male78%
Blackn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female77%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
American Indiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%

Reading

All Students83%
Female80%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
American Indiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female89%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%

Reading

All Students87%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%

Writing

All Students72%
Female76%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant72%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Vermont used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing and grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The NECAP reading, math, and writing tests are given in the fall and test students on content taught in the previous year. The science portion of the NECAP is administered in the Spring each year and has its results released the following Fall. As a result, GreatSchools' ratings for Vermont currently reflect 2012-13 test results, the most recent year with data for all subjects.

2013-14 state-level results are not available for the Vermont NECAP; please see here for more information.

The NECAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Vermont. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Vermont Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Vermont Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 93% 92%
Hispanic 3% 1%
Two or more races 2% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 2%
Black 1% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 12%N/A36%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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345 Harbor Rd
Shelburne, VT 05482
Phone: (802) 985-3331

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