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GreatSchools Rating

Oyster-Adams Bilingual School

Public | PK-8 | 668 students

We are best known for dual immersion program.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 11 ratings
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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33 reviews of this school


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Posted February 21, 2014

The school has no leadership. Teachers are totally unsupported and left on the own battling their own problems with no support from their principal or from the rest of the very incompetent administration. As a result there are a number of growing discipline problems. The school does not have a consistent or effective behavior management system so children do whatever they want. This is particularly true in 5th grade this year. Overall, there is a tone of disrespect and disorganization across the building. The school runs thanks to the very competent and dedicated teachers not the administration. By 5th grade many parents take their children out in search of a more structured and organized middle school that handles problems like these more effectively.


Posted January 14, 2014

We have had an awful experience with the Spanish Assistant Principal in the middle school campus who doesn't seem to be capable of managing discipline problems or anything else for that matter. Our child has been suffering from constant bullying from the very beginning of the year and nothing seems to be done by either the administration of the school counselor. We are not impressed by the incompetency of the administration to handle these matters. It is incredibly frustrating for parents and students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2013

We agree with the review below that the environment is that of a big family. To be honest, that is not enough for us. It is important that there is a nurturing environment where the kids feel safe but no when the academics are put at risk. We have been very disappointed with the school's policy of "one size fits all" where kids who have the potential do not get challenged once they get to Middle School. We are also shocked by the incompetency of both assistant principals (one of them has been very rude to us) and their uninspiring principal. The ongoing and increasing discipline problems that don't seem to get resolved are also a problem. As, one parent points out, there are not real consequences for those who do not follow the rules. I agree that most of the teachers are excellent and very committed to the bilingual program but there is not much they can do with so little support from their administration. You can sense their frustrations as soon as you enter the school.


Posted November 3, 2013

I am well aware that Oyster Adams is not for everyone. It is fairly chaotic, zero leveled math except for one pretty low-key eighth grade Algebra 1 class, and yes, some questionable teachers. But honestly, this school is home. The environment is that of a big family. Everyone loves everyone and tries to make them happy and smart and wonderful. It's not a touchy-feely kind of support, it's more that you know you're loved when you walk in those doors. OA kids are fiercely loyal, unbelievably intelligent, unified, and more than prepared for the real world. It may not be "challenging" or have a GT program, but the unflinching devotion of everybody in these schools is palpable. The middle school is small and by the time the kids graduate, they might as well be siblings. It's not that everything is about bonding, this bonding just happens and it is beautiful to watch. The kids cry on the last day of school. They high-five on the first. The teachers will do anything if the kid tries hard enough, and believe me, many of those teachers are unparalleled elsewhere. I cannot give OA enough praise. Try and look past the critics and into the heart of this school, and you will be blown away.


Posted October 28, 2013

As the parent below points out, Oyster Adams is about uncertainty and miscommunication which is very frustrating for both parents and teachers. Classrooms are under resourced and teachers are overloaded with work (some of them have over 50 students) whilst the funds are directed to pay for 3 not very effective assistant principals. It would make more sense to invest that money in the classrooms to support the teachers instead. Besides this, discipline continues to be a problem as there are not real consequences for bad behavior. Bullying is also an issue. Students have a lot of power and they know it. The school is falling apart rapidly.


Posted October 5, 2013

O-A is currently considered the best Spanish instruction in DCPS. It has a more diverse and educated Spanish-speaking population than other public and charter schools. Very international, tolerant, and welcoming to families of mixed heritages. However, it can be frustrating. The teaching model seems to change often because DCPS budget and staff models aren't applicable to O-A being in two locations. Elementary grades are split over a mile apart but DCPS gives one music teacher. Parents pay for a second one. No longer two teachers per classroom. Some teachers work with 50 children. High % of SPED but under-resourced. Middle school is VERY small. Principal is aware of challenges and growing bilingual competition from charters. My children have been happy and the community is generous with money and time. But the school is very dependent on families. More and more are exploring charters. But O-A continues to be the leading bilingual school in the city. If you can handle uncertainty and some miscommunication, but enjoy creativity and diversity, it can be a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

We love this school!! The Prinicpals, teachers, the support staff and the parents are so focus on the academic success for the children. Whenever I have any concerns about my child's development. The staff's open door policy and strategies has always help my child make progress and strengthen her confidence. We are a big family that I feel tries very hard to put out the fires that can destroy our children foundation for the future. It's not the building, but it's the people inside that shapes the children's future. Bravo, Bravo to our Oyster-Adams family!!! Let's keep moving forward for our children's future. Ask not what your child's school can do for you, but what you can do for your child's school to make it better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2013

Teacher morale is low and dissatisfaction very high. Teachers feel unsupported and often disrespected. Staff turnover is very high. We need a more supportive and efficient administration for the school to survive.


Posted June 12, 2013

What I love most about Oyster elementary is the social environment. Truly a supportive and diverse community, a place to build life skills. I am very happy that my kids are there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

Having a bilingual program is great. The trouble is kids need to master & excel in skills beyond languages later in life and Adams does not offer a challenging academic curriculum in the middle school years. I hope they get it right someday. It's just disappointing my kids won't see the benefits...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2013

Discipline problems are on the increase in the middle school due to poor leadership. In addition quality of instruction varies from classroom to classroom as there is no real supervision to ensure consistency. My kids have had very good teachers and very bad ones too. Teachers receive very little support and are left on their own to battle the daily problems. Many are very fed up. I agree with some of the comments that parents have posted here. The school really needs new leadership to survive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2013

Great teachers but very poor administration. Both, teachers and parents are frustated with the current principal and her team. The school needs new leadership to survive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2013

The teachers at the school are great and very committed to make the dual program successful. However the administration is weak and uninspiring. The current principal is not acting as a leader and seems to be unable to make any decisions at all. The assistant principals are just as bad. The middle school campus in particular is badly run. Discipline problems are on the increase because there isn't a clear policy for students. Students misbehave because the school allows them to do so. It is a real shame.


Posted September 2, 2012

Grade 7 and 8 are relatively new additions and continuing with the bilingual immersion or choosing a different middle school is a hard choice for some (not all) parents. In the early years, this school so inspired my daughter to an incredible love of learning and passion for going to school,developed her values and worldly outlook. Immersion schooling was a privilege, a huge challenge for leaders to deliver but wonderful. And a special aspect of this school is its true commitment to diversity and inclusivity. Each child is taught to feel special for who they are, to develop and value their self-identity and appreciate others. All in all it was an incredible experience for my daughter and I am ever grateful to the dedicated staff, and exceptional community. Now it has middle school years that with support can become wonderful too. The principal is Harvard educated and PIONEERED a bilingual school successfully in a more challenging demographic situation prior to this appointment. I trust her background and leadership. It is complex. Parents listen and support or move elsewhere at the middle school stage. Pre-K to grade 6 is really special, a privilege for sure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2012

My children will just be starting the Oyster-Adams Middle School, I have received mixed reviews regarding the school. I love bilingual education for my children, however, I will not sacrifice high academic expectations to get it.


Posted June 10, 2012

I have had a different experience than what the other parents have recently discussed. It's true that they aren't going to offer a lot of leveled math instruction, but that's due to it's small size. Small size=less money=fewer teachers. There just aren't enough teachers to offer the leveled math instruction that some parents want. That is a drawback to some parents. However, the small size contributes to a very close-knit community. All teachers know every student in the school, and my son appreciates that everyone knows him. I also have to disagree about the curriculum not challenging students as well. Just take a look at the 8th grade graduating class - over half of them have been accepted to prestigious private high schools or selective public area high schools. This, to me, tells me that my son has received an above average education and is ready to take on high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2012

Huge discipline problems and a very uninspiring principal are the negatives of the school. The English teachers are good and so are the parents. There are very few good Spanish Teachers. In general they tend to be very weak.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2012

Teachers and parents do a great job, Principal leadership is below average, most students don't behave well. This wasn't the case with last principal
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2012

After many years in the school we have deciced to leave for another middle school that can offer the academic challenges that our kids need. The current Principal doesn't believe in offering different levels of math instruction, Instead her philosophy seems to be "one size fits all" . Other middle schools offer a much better and more solid curriculum than Oyster does so we are leaving. In adddition, the current administration is very weak. The school has serious discipline problems which they seem unable to resolve. We have tried to speak to the current principal several times and have offered her different solutions but she doens't want to hear. IT is a shame and it breaks our heart, as we really do believe in bilingual education, but not at the expense of putting the academics at risk. We feel that if we stay at Oyster our child's education will suffer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2012

We are very dissapointed and frustrated with the current principal. She is making really bad decisions with regards to teacher selection and the middle school program. What is worse is that she doesn't listen to parents and ignores any concerns, or suggestions parents might have. As a result of her weak leadership, the program is becoming so average that a bilingual education for our children is not longer a priority , if the academics are going to suffer. We know that many other families think likewise and many are leaving the school. Amongst those there are Spanish speaking families like us. It is a real shame as Oyster used to be a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 43% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 58% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 52% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
75%
Writing

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 54% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 42% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 58% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
70%
Writing

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 55% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 43% in 2011.

361 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2011.

357 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 35% in 2011.

111 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 41% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students85%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
White, non-Hispanic100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
White, non-Hispanic100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students83%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Hispanic83%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Hispanic74%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Writing

All Students71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students79%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic84%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Science

All Students86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students77%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantaged64%
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students93%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic93%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantaged83%
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantaged77%
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Writing

All Students85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

Math

All Students86%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic84%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Black, non-Hispanicn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
White, non-Hispanicn/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Disabledn/a
Limited or not English proficientn/a

Science

All Students82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington, D.C. used the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC-CAS) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and 10, science in grades 5, 8, and 10, and composition in grades 4, 7, and 10. The DC-CAS is a standards-based testing program, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the District of Columbia. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

In 2012-2013, this school was designated "Reward".

About the tests


The DC school classification system includes multiple measures to evaluate performance and student growth. The possible classifications, from highest to lowest, are Reward, Rising, Developing, Focus and Priority. These measures include the DC CAS, annual growth, graduation rates, attendance rates and participation rates. Under the system, required under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), each school is given a School Index Score based on the performance of its students. Schools receive different levels of support, resources, flexibility and monitoring based on their classification.

Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the city.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests in the District of Columbia. Test scores are based on 2012-13 DC CAS results.

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10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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City
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1 This rating is based on 2012-13 DC CAS results from the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE).

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in math and reading from the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE).

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 60% N/A
White 25% 1%
Black 8% 1%
Two or more races 4% 57%
Asian 2% N/A
Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 29%N/AN/A
Special education 11%N/A13%
English learners 23%N/A7%
Source: Office of the State Superintendent of Education, 2011-2012

Attendance

  This school District averageState average
All Students 98%N/AN/A
Asian/Pacific Islander 97%N/AN/A
Black, not Hispanic 97%N/AN/A
Hispanic 98%N/AN/A
White, not Hispanic 98%N/AN/A
Economically disadvantaged 98%N/AN/A
Students with disabilities 98%N/AN/A
Limited English proficient 98%N/AN/A
Source: DCPS, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
Computer specialist(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Outdoor learning lab
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Clubs
  • Dance club
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered
  • Spanish
Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Swimming pool
Clubs
  • Yoga club
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:45am
School end time
  • 3:15pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 8:00 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Monica Liang-Aguirre
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
Is there an application process?
  • Yes

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • STEM
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Foreign languages
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • Spanish
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities
Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Remediation
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • 96 (Stadium Armory - McLean Gardens), X3 (Minnesota Ave - McLean Gardens), L1, L2, L4 (Chevy Chase Circle - Potomac Park/Dupont Circle/McPherson Sq)
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Outdoor learning lab
  • Playground
  • Science lab
  • Swimming pool
Partnerships with local resources and organizations
  • U.S. Chess Center
  • Petit Plats
  • The Washington Hilton
  • The World Bank
  • The Ford Foundation
School leaders can update this information here.

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and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Judo / Other Martial Arts
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Judo / Other Martial Arts
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Chess club
  • Dance club
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook
  • Yoga club
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Wilson High School
School Without Walls
McKinnely Tech High School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2020 19th St. NW
Washington, DC 20008
Website: Click here
Phone: (202) 673-7311

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