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GreatSchools Rating

J M Weatherwax High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted April 16, 2014

J.M. Weatherwax High School Both of my children have graduated from this high school and have earned Master's Degrees. This high school offers more Advanced Placement courses than any other school in the county. It's students achieve higher college placement scores than any other high school in the area. The school has just implemented a one on one technology program where each student is issued an RT Surface tablet. The school is also home to a Skill Center where students from other schools in the county can attend. It has out standing activities as well as an extensive athletic program which students can join. It is an outstanding school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

As a previous employee I can say that everything you will read in these reviews is sad, but true.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 2, 2011

I am highly disappointed in the school...my daughter has been enduring bullying and harassment since entering the high school as a freshman. We have been in numerous times to discuss this matter with the appropriate staff. Their response has been that she needs to learn to ignore it and that they cannot follow the harasser around all day. Are you serious? A child can only take so much bullying and harassment before they snap. I am now in the process of filing a complaint because they have allowed a harassing student to return as a student at the school after already 2 expulsions. Our children should have the right to a safe environment to receive an education, this is not the case here. I'm working on having my children withdrawn from the school district to have their education home-based where they will feel safe and be able to concentrate on their education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2009

Alot of students don't pay attention or put off their work and then when they are failing then the parents want to know why. maybe their kids should go to school of not mess around when theyre there because i have raised my grades and im just the average student and there are many opportunities to raise your grade like the after school program every day except half days and fridays. which the teachers help you and if you need quieter areas they give you that..or help they help youu! its not hard and its not the teachers fault students fail!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 16, 2009

I am a parent with a wonderful spouse who is a step parent to my children- we have consistently tried to develop and maintain relationships with my child's teachers but to no avail. It should not be so difficult to get updates from the teachers on how our child is doing and what we can do to help him reach his potential. I almost feel that since I am not the custodial parent that my concerns and attempts to 'reach out' have not been taken seriously. It has been a frustrating experience trying to get consistency on any level. Although I am sure there are many wonderful teachers who have every good intention, we however, have not had much luck. It's very unfortunate and we don't have the same experiences with our other children's teachers who attend other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2008

I have never in all my years dreamed that I would have to see such horrible conditions. This school shows no respect for the students nor the parents. They would just assume to let some children fall without help and encourgement! The staff- all though not all are the same. I found very few staff here that were about the students and learning instead of detentions and unfair treatment. The is a great divided line between the care for the students and what just make this school look good!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2007

This school is not the best. The principals and higher authority are not welcoming and seem to care more about the appearance of the school, rather than the children themselves. Leaving many behind in understanding and safety. Although the higher staff may be less than satisfactory, the teachers themselves are wonderful and try their best with what they're given. Special thanks to Ms. Portmann. She's a wonderful and understanding teacher.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 27, 2007

Mrs. Scharder is the best teacher at the school. She cares about all of her students achieving something in life. She is awesome. This school really cares about its students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 30, 2007

This School is great!! I especially Like teachers, Mrs. Johnson, Mrs. Revel, Mr.Dore, Mr. Brunke, and of course Mr. Cook!! I give this school a perfect 10!
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
45%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
93%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
29%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

211 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
41%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
55%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
23%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female40%
Male26%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Low income32%
Not low income35%
Special educationn/a
Not special education34%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students82%
Female84%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic59%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income81%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female98%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
White96%
Low income100%
Not low income96%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students13%
Female13%
Male12%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic21%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White10%
Low income16%
Not low income4%
Special education0%
Not special education18%
Limited English25%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students57%
Female63%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander70%
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income50%
Not low income67%
Special education8%
Not special education64%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students53%
Female56%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income50%
Not low income56%
Special educationn/a
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students13%
Female22%
Male7%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White16%
Low income14%
Not low income9%
Special educationn/a
Not special education14%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students19%
Femalen/a
Male11%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
White27%
Low income20%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students9%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education9%
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

215 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
34%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

230 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
72%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

203 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
34%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

221 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students73%
Female78%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic63%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income65%
Not low income84%
Special education32%
Not special education78%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students77%
Female85%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic65%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income72%
Not low income84%
Special education40%
Not special education82%
Limited English39%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 65% 60%
Hispanic 21% 20%
Two or more races 9% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 14%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 255%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 51%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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410 North G St
Aberdeen, WA 98520
Phone: (360) 538-2044

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