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GreatSchools Rating

Arlington High School

Public | 9-12 | 1537 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted July 28, 2014

One of the highest funded schools, yet their pupils fail basic exams for mathematics, chemistry, physics. Is that a new "low" for science or what? But surely enough, children's PE scores are very high. Had to move out of this place simply because of the schools. Disgusting experience. The place we rented before thinking of purchasing a house (no longer plans) - neighbors' 15-year olds (who attend this school) - smoking pot and shooting guns when parents are away. Calling sheriff did not produce any results - children's parents work for County. Finding used condoms on our rental property was not a shocker - those 15-year olds are running lose as in this whole neighborhood. Zero manners in these children. It is so WRONG - to give more than 1 star to this school. We ended-up moving down south, so our children can grow-up without exposure to drugs, guns, condoms and attend DECENT school in Woodinville...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2014

Contrary to this schools high evaluations, this school is horrible. there is lots of bullying, and no help from the adults, the few good teachers that are there have no back up from administration. i do not recommend going here. ever.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 19, 2012

I am a senior and I have seen multiple changes at Arlington High through the years some good some bad. The administration has heavily improved through my 4 years at AHS . With the exception of 1 administrator who has been here all 4 years. The math program has gotten worse through the years and is just a total disaster to say the least. There's only 1 good math instructor and he's the calculus teacher. The english and art programs and both great I've enjoyed all my english teachers through the years though 1 has left. The science program is hit or miss with some great instructors and some not so great. We could use more AP classes but are thankful to have the ones in which we have. Sports have improved every year with multiple teams taking the step to state. The school's leadership is no longer ran but the Vice Principal and by someone else who does a much better job which has improved our school spirit!
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 11, 2011

Haha. lots of diversity here... white diversity, that is. We have the hick whites, the prep whites, the bodybuilding whites (they give jocks a terrible name), and of course the everyday, average students. Its about 95% white, but yet, this is a wonderful school. Great teachers, minus a few. Incredibly smart junior class (I'd say about 15-20 valedictorians coming into senior year). Top class musical and theatre programs. However, if one were to complain, it would be on how much we emphasize silly projects such as the scholarly paper and senior presentation. Some say this is college prep, but it is taking away from valuable class time. We'd be a top academic school, if it weren't for the random research and presentations wasting our time. I don't want a project to determine if i graduate either. I'd much rather be in AP calculus my junior year, but because of our flawed educational system, thats impossible. our math, science, and english advancement is sub-par. Colleges want to see top class mathematical and scientific skills, and our school will never deliver unless we get rid of the "college preparation" projects.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 10, 2010

Outstanding High School, especially if your kids are into sports or drama. The teachers, and coaches especially are wonderful. The only downside about this school is that it's not very diverse (aka; mostly white, middle class). It's surprisingling modern for such a small town. Would highly recommend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2009

The administration at this school controls everything. I am currently a junior attending Arlington High School, and cannot wait to leave. The academics are good. I give the school credit for that. Plus, the teachers really make an effort to accompany all students. But the way in which we are confined to this conservative ideology that doesn't allow for individual thinking is ridiculous. Our vice-principal runs the ASB. This guarantees that the students have no voice. Slowly but surely school has become more and more of a bother than a learning environment. And no, I'm not one of those 'I hate school' type kids. I maintain a 3.85 GPA while playing baseball, leading the debate team, and hours of community service. We need change.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 2, 2008

Grandson is doing great with your school, appreciate all the activity and learning and the rotc program


Posted September 12, 2008

As another student said, I also found this school to be overridden with cliques. The teachers are hit-or-miss, but there are some good ones. Students do not even know the name of their principal. Faculty does set high academic standards and this school offers a variety of advanced classes. Sports are average, clubs aren't bad either. Parents are hardly ever involved... if at all. (Except for reading the report card when it comes in the mail or going to a band concert if the child plays an instrument or is in choir). Many of the students are friendly despite the segregation, but certainly not all of them.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 10, 2008

I was just enrolled in AHS this year as a freshman, and, contrary to what some parents think, the school is extremely clique and class oriented. Freshmen are severely discriminated against (of course, I really wasn't expecting any different), and different groups do not mesh well whatsoever. I would say that the academics are, for the most part, fairly good, and sporst and clubs are very open and welcoming.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 2, 2007

I go to Arlington, we have a great time while learning a lot. The faculty and my peers are extremely supportive.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 1, 2007

We moved here last year from out of state, and the Academics are outstanding!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2007

While the quality of education from teaching staff and opportunity at this high school are outstanding, I see little leadership from the Principal/Vice Principal and feel our tax dollars could hire much more strength than we currently have for the volume of students. I agree with the emphasis on wrong doing and not enough emphasis on rewarding the good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2007

I am a parent of a student who completed his freshman year last year. The teachers seem concerned and although overworked, probably comparible to other public schools. There is a lot of emphasis on what your child is doing wrong and not much emphasis on what they are doing right. The students do seem to all get along with each other, without much class/race descrimination. However, the school is mostly comprised of white students. Population growth in Arlington has definately impacted ability to adjust properly. I salute anyone who chooses teaching as a career. Teachers work hard at the school. But the staff needs to figure out some counseling programs to identify problems and work with both students and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2007

I find this school to be excellent...all the kids get along exceptionally and there really are no social groups. Everyone is friends with Everyone else. The academic skills of the children is great after atending this school. even though the classes are large the teachers try to get to everyone. This school impresses me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2006

It's a great school if your child is self-motivated and can esentially teach themselves, however I don't recommend it for kids who need more one-on-one attention because with average class sizes of 30 these kinds of kids get lost in the shuffle. They have been trying to open the Performing Arts Center for over 3 years now - ever since the H.S. opened in the Fall of 2003 - and are still trying to raise another 2 million in order to open it. There's too much emphasis on the football and boy's basketball teams and not enough on academics and the arts!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2005

My daughter started at Arlington her sophomore year, and she will be a junior in the fall. We are very pleased with the quality of teachers. We are also pleased with the amount of extra-curricular activites available. Our daughter is a very good student, and takes challenging courses. She is not necessarily 'popular' as she is shy, but there doesn't seem to be real 'cliques' that cause social problems at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2005

Alington High School is a great small town school. I have graduated 3 students, with a fourth currently enrolled. My college bound children took all the academic ability they needed with them to succeed at the college level, the oldest (and only one finished) graduating with Dean's honors. Three of my children have participated in the music program which surely is one of the finest in the state. It is excellent, and the truest test is that the program continues to grow each year. Sports programs can be on the weaker side, but with a few exceptions I have found the coaches to be excellent mentors, and skilled leaders. Over the years we have been involved with basketball, baseball, track, football and wrestling, and only one coach has left a sour aftertaste with me. Those motivated to get all they can will find Arlington rich in excellent teachers and extra-curricular activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2005

Academics at AHS are excellent. Our Hi-Q team (a trivia club) won first place in State in 2004, for example. Our bands and our jazz choir are some of the best in the state. Our sports teams are not as skilled, but we all still have spirit! And judging by the filled wall of Booster Club members' names, most of whom are parents, there is definately plenty of parent involvement. Also, since this school was only opened in 2003, the facilities are amazing! Most of the teachers are very interactive with the students, making it actually fun to learn. Also, any student who had experienced a different school district will tell anyone else that most students get along abnormally well. The 'cliques' seem to sort of blend together, and almost everyone shows an overwhelming amount of common courtesy.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
94%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
40%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

291 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
83%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

208 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
88%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
69%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
44%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Female74%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special education41%
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income100%
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Female29%
Male31%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Low income28%
Not low income31%
Special education17%
Not special education33%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students79%
Female85%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income70%
Not low income83%
Special education31%
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students83%
Female82%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income81%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students47%
Female60%
Male38%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White42%
Low income64%
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education47%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

407 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

373 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

363 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
47%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

369 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students91%
Female94%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic85%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income87%
Not low income92%
Special education63%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students84%
Female94%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income79%
Not low income86%
Special education57%
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 80% 60%
Hispanic 10% 20%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 224%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 75%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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18821 Crown Ridge Blvd
Arlington, WA 98223
Website: Click here
Phone: (360) 618-6300

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