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GreatSchools Rating

Tukes Valley Middle School

Public | 5-8 | 100 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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7 reviews of this school


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Posted March 18, 2014

Schools great, I love that they send a student to stay with your child on their first day when they are new to the school... but the office staff is really rude and unprofessional, I had one of them tell me to write a note for my daughter if she was going to be picked up "would you" and hung up on me. Sorry but there are times when things come up. My daughter had told me she's afraid to use the office phone because they insulted her intelligence because she had to make a long distance call and forgot what number to press. Time for new staff!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2014

Honestly, I was disappointed. Their knowledge of dyslexia is LACKING to the point of failure to acknowledge it's existence until faced with a diagnosis. I found that were not receptive to the FACT that 20% of their students are likely dyslexic and that 80% of children receiving special reading intervention are affected by it. That begs the question, just how effective are their methods of helping the 80% of students with dyslexia in these reading intervention programs if they don't know what the definitions of dyslexia is? I found that they were not using up to date programs. It became apparent that they were unable/unwilling to educate themselves and update their programs. That being said, I have found the staff there very caring and willing to provide my child with appropriate accommodations. Appropriate accommodations coupled with specific, meaningful OUTSIDE tutoring is working for my child. I wish the administration would up their game on helping their dyslexic students insisting on providing them with the most effective methods of intervention rather than clinging to old, outdated programs that I know from experience DID NOT WORK for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2013

I am a former student of this school and it was a wonderful experience for me in general. I was able to form a close bond with teachers. The ones I've had were very kind, hardworking, and helpful, always ready to do their best. It was not just the teachers, but the faculty in general. I'd like to say different things about some of the students attending, but overall I'd say this is one of the best schools of the district. The only problem was the lack of rigor in the courses. The only advanced course available is High School Algebra I. I wish I had more of a head start for higher education when attending that school. I did have some extra work for Highly Capable, but possibly more Pre-AP or honors courses would be propitious. I know you wouldn't hear most students saying things like this, but I believe it would be beneficial.


Posted June 6, 2010

love this school! the food is good and i love the big gym. the playground for the Middle is okay but it could use more stuff to do.


Posted August 17, 2009

i like the football field, lunch, and, surprisingly for me, science, because we do fun activities
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 3, 2009

This is our first year as a brand new school with a combined staff & student population from 3 different buildings. I didn't rate us as excellent yet, as there are still a few bugs we need to work out of the system - or even simply develop that part of the system at all - but for our first year, I think we are on very solid ground with a great foundation. It seems to me that our staff genuinely care about not only the students, but each other as well. Our 'kids' are also a sensitive bunch, not perfect, but still wonderful to work with. All in all, this is a soon-to-be excellent school to teach at, and I hope the kids feel the same about this place where they learn & grow as people. Go, Timberwolves!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 8, 2009

Tukes valley is doing very good for it's first year here. They have a nice staff and good teachers.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
41%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female55%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income58%
Not low income68%
Special education33%
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students78%
Female72%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income70%
Not low income83%
Special education67%
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female75%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income67%
Not low income85%
Special education45%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female65%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic33%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income60%
Not low income61%
Special education16%
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female84%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income64%
Not low income82%
Special education37%
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female69%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic46%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income63%
Not low income78%
Special education20%
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female78%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic62%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income59%
Not low income82%
Special education20%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students92%
Female96%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income90%
Not low income92%
Special education90%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students54%
Female55%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic30%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income38%
Not low income63%
Special education15%
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female73%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income58%
Not low income82%
Special education62%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students71%
Female70%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income55%
Not low income79%
Special education62%
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students96%
Female93%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income100%
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 60%
Hispanic 5% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 12%N/A8%
Special education 118%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 234%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 15N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 73%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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20601 NE 167th Ave
Battle Ground, WA 98604
Phone: (360) 885-6250

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