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GreatSchools Rating

Newport Senior High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted June 20, 2014

My son went to Newport high school. The education quality matched the reputation as one of the top public high school in the USA. The teachers were capable and responsible, great academic challenging environment, made my kid to try hard to catch up and do more to out perform his friends. No bully, no drug, great discipline, just a great school for my son to grow up. Thank you all to make my son who he is now, a senior at Duke University, with great future ahead of him. If you want your kid to have a great high school, Newport high definitely should be your choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2014

There is a math teacher that should be fired and the school is fully aware of it. She's (hint) terrible , students are intimidated to ask questions, and yet she's protected by her union.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2013

Parents, teachers and students all only care about grades. Nothing else. They don't care about whether they learned anything, in the end the only thing that matters are the grades. Handouts are given without any explanation, and we are expected to do fine. Everything has to be done with a pen and paper. I believe classes should be a lot more interactive.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 28, 2013

Newport High School prepares kids to perform wonderfully in the academic aspects - but the social aspects could use some work. There is hardly any snottiness or sense of entitlement, yet I've seen some straight out bullying.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

We moved from a private school to Newport and have found the academics are at a high standard for public school. A high percentage of the parents are highly concerned about education quality and are involved in the community. As most schools, we've found there are teachers who are outstanding and a few that are not so great. There are athletics programs, but this is not a strong point. Overall an above average high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2011

If you fit into either the 'smart prep/jock' category, or the '5 APs a semester' category, you will excel. If not, well too bad for you. As long as you sign up for APs, they'll like you! I had a girl who is very mentally challenged just switch into my World History class from AP World. I'm not sure why they had her sign up for AP. AP isbn't for the smart kid, it's for the average one. Most people don't really know why they're taking APs, I felt like there was actually some manipulation to try to get us to take 'the AP route'. Newport has a great rep, but honestly, I don't think this can be very balanced. Some very good teachers, but also some very poor. Administration is very concerned with the school's status.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 10, 2011

although I know that there will always be good teachers and mediocre teachers, it seems like Newport has lowered its standards in hiring or in monitoring the quality of their teachers. Quite a few of the teachers do not even have any concept of keeping the students interested in the class, let alone engage them to be more interested in learning. I know its a public school, but it is still incumbent upon the teacher to have an open communication line between the student and the parents if there is a need for improvement. We just have not seen this at all. We had very high expectations from NHS, but are now quite disappointed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2010

Extremely weak eclectic curriculum and instructional materials, poor presentation, especially in math and science. Teachers don't understand elementary laws and patterns of human learning, let alone any advanced pedagogical techniques. Adherence to discovering/minimum instruction method : no explanations provided, just activities to do from the book, which doesn t have any explanations either. Then teachers just register who managed to get it and who didn t. Horrific failure rates the administration refuses to disclose. Teachers have in their contract a right to not post grades for FIVE WEEKS! They constantly lose submitted assignments and then give students Fs for them. No way to prove that it was not student s fault. No communication to parents about problems except in final grade reports. No graded papers allowed to be taken home come and see them during your work day if you want and can. Unethical behavior of some teachers, insulting and psychologically traumatizing students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2009

Our children were B students yet were extremely well prepared for college by Newport. Our son, who graduated with a 2.6, just registered for college and earned an entire semester of credit for his AP work. Nice. Our daughter graduated with a 3.0 and now carries a 3.7 in college. She noticed immediately as a freshman the incredible quality of her preparation compared to her classmates. What students perceive as harsh discipline I would characterize as consistent and objective leadership. The environment is calm and well-managed, and we have not had the problems that other schools have had. Newport has an award-winning PTSA. Its annual Ski Swap has been the best of its kind for over twenty years. Bellevue's other high schools are also excellent. You can find the same curriculum at much smaller neighboring schools, which can be less intimidating and better able to provide a highly personal educational experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2009

Newport High School have great programs in any field of academics a public high school can offer. Students are highly motivated in all areas--sports, arts, music, and academics. There are so many students taking AP classes and still manage to be well-rounded in other areas as well. Teachers are very supportive and almost all of them are willing to help students outside the class hour (the half hour after school). Newport High School is one of few high schools that really pushes all the students to try their best.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 10, 2008

Great School! Its pretty big but there is always a lot going on. Not too cliquey, tons of academic, extracurricualr and athletic oppurtunities. K-N-I-G-H-T-S Newport Knighs are the Best!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 28, 2008

Of course this school is hard! Its job is to prepare you for the real world. The classes are tough and there's the AP push to improve the school's image. Yet the teachers (most anyways) are extremely supportive and experianced. Both the admin and student ASB leave much to be desired, but the sports program is great. If your self-motivated child would thrive in a highly competative and large student body, Newport is the place for you! Go Knights!
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 5, 2008

If your student loves music but also wants to focus on academics, go to Newport.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2008

Newport is best for the arts overall and probably for academics. There is less pressure to be popular and fashionable than at Bellevue, HS. For sports, it depends: Bellevue has football, basketball, but Newport has soccer, gymnastics, baseball, cross-country. Volleyball and swimming depends on the year. There are some incredible teachers and many fine ones who all care deeply about their students and their profession. Unfortunately, the administration leaves a lot to be desired; they have become more autocratic every year, with little regard for student stress levels or individuality. Student culture is not valued; there is a tendency to punish with a heavy hand. AP classes can be dangerous territory for many families: getting out of one when a student is over their head is just about impossible. Any counselor who shows a pattern of sympathy letting kids switch out of AP is shipped out to a lesser school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2008

All you adults who think the tardy policy is too harsh is complete rubbish. If you are late to work or don't bother to show up, you can't have your mom cover for you. Your boss will just fire you because he knows that he can easily hire someone who will be there on time. The real world is a harsh place, the administration doesn't have time for people being late either. So shut up, sit up, and stop complaining.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2007

This is my senior year, and I've spent my high school career the 'Newport' way. I'm involved in community service with two nonprofit organizations, I dance almost 15 hours per week, I'm taking 6 AP classes this year, and until last semester I had a cumulative 4.0. The experience was great for me, but the crazy thing is that I'm not considered an overachiever by most of the kids in my classes, or by my teachers. I have friends that don't handle that kind of pressure well, but what BSD has set out to do (prepare everyone for college, according to its mission statement) I think it does best at Newport. But we also have huge freedoms. we're allowed to wear hats, hoods and bandanas, listen to ipods when we're working quietly, no one enforces a 'language policy', all we have to do is show up on time and pay attention.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 29, 2007

Newport High is a great school for the many students, but administrators are always shuffling the students who fall between the cracks. They have no concern for students who are unable to keep up with the rigor they have set for high standards. They are mostly concerned with keeping their national status. The school is too large to give everyone the education they deserve and desire. Class sizes are huge, and attendance policies are unfounded. It is all about scores!! What a shame that our local public school cannot educate all the children in our community, just the smart ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2006

Great academic program. More than enough extra-curricular activities. PTA is really strong.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2005

Very highly educated kids. Very effective staff.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 12, 2005

this school does a terrible job of treating kids as learners and they instead treat them as numbers for their desire to be a blue ribbon school.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
46%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

377 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

270 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
94%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
77%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
67%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students97%
Female94%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Black100%
Asian97%
Asian/Pacific Islander97%
Hispanic90%
Multiracial93%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income84%
Not low income96%
Special education78%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students94%
Female96%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian99%
Asian/Pacific Islander99%
Hispanic83%
Multiracial91%
White95%
Low income76%
Not low income96%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students58%
Femalen/a
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian75%
Asian/Pacific Islander75%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income42%
Not low income65%
Special education32%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students71%
Female71%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students72%
Female67%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

420 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

433 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

359 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students99%
Female99%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian99%
Asian/Pacific Islander99%
Hispanic95%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income98%
Not low income99%
Special education87%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian99%
Asian/Pacific Islander99%
Hispanic89%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income94%
Not low income99%
Special education86%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 40% 7%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Hispanic 5% 20%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 17%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 214%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 62%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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4333 Factoria Blvd SE
Bellevue, WA 98006
Phone: (425) 456-7400

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