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Woodin Elementary School

Public | PK-6 | 586 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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20 reviews of this school


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Posted April 5, 2014

Our experience at Woodin was poor, primarily due to the principal. I had serious concerns about my child and teacher and scheduled multiple appointments with the principal which she would cancel repeatedly at the last minute. When I went in to finally meet her she was rude and demeaning, acting as if the school issue were really a parent/discipline issue. We got no support when we asked for it and when we pushed for it she suggested that maybe we should leave the school. I am a rational, responsible parent and have now been happily at another school for several years receiving the appropriate support for my son. If your child needs any special services these will not be met well at Woodin. This was not just my experience, but the experience of other parents I spoke to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2012

My child has struggled with the bullies at Woodin. Very little is done to discipline these children. Teachers don't see the issues because the bullies hide their actions. The victims remain scared and not excited to go to school & their learning suffers. The kids all know the teachers won't do anything. I feel the principal needs to put into effect a much more strongly enforced policy, that benefits ALL the children. Homework help would be great, but is NOT offered.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2012

We transferred to Woodin from a school in Seattle a little over a year ago and both my daughter and I are very happy with it. She was in the advanced learning Spectrum program in Seattle, but the curriculum at Woodin is challenging enough for her that we decided not to test her for AP until junior high. The class sizes are much smaller than what we're used to also. Most of the staff take diversity and anti-bullying seriously and my daughter feels very safe there. One of my friends did have a problem with her son's teacher not taking bullying seriously so she had to step up and advocate for him. Bullies are a problem everywhere unfortunately, and I am happy that the majority of the staff are on board with not letting bullies get away with it at Woodin. No school is 100% perfect so if a teacher isn't meeting your expectations speak up and go to the principal or district and put your foot down. We moved here too late for my daughter to enter the dual language program but she is exposed to Spanish every day just being at the school and that's really neat.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2011

My child also bullying at woodin, actually teachers are concerned about it. But, still bullying are contenue every single days. specially, reeces time are meny bullies!!!! Woodin school is missing action???? Yes! it is. Woddin have to taking more siriously about bullies at school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2011

My child has also struggled with bullying at Woodin, actually 2 of my children. It seems like the officeis far more concerned with how children are doing on tests..than calling parents when they have a child that is hurting other students, and I am so disappointed. Kids need to feel safe and protected by the adults at school so they can turn their energy toward learning. Woodin does not even recognize this as a problem, and as a volunteer, the recess ladies have zero clue what is going on at all. They stand in one spot and talk to each other all reeces long and do not know how to listen to children or handle conflict. I'm sickened that they are on payroll and kids are getting bullied regularly, and they are still there yapping to each other and missing the action.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2011

My child has been at Woodin for ~ 1 yr. At her previou school she was excelling in English & wasput in an acceleration program- something they don't have here.She's always had good grades. During the parent conference this winter I found out her grades were pretty low. I knew that she was struggling w/ bullies & it reflected inher work. I've been for trying to resolve the issues w/ bullying but nothing has been done & no one tells me when there are problems. There's a serious lack of communication at Woodin & bullies run rampant. Also, the teachers don't seem to have time/ability to work w/ students on an individual basis & it's sad that my daughter,who just last year loved school & was a yr ahead of her class w/ regards to literature, is now floundering because she feels like she has nothing to look forward to in class &is bored w/ English assignments
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2009

As the parent of a high functioning autistic child, I am thrilled with Woodin Elementary. Other school districts have given lip service to our concerns for our child's education. Woodin's staff has actively worked with us, our child, and his behavioral specialists. The results have been stunning. Bravo! to Wooding Elementary's staff and administraton. There's something special going on there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

Hands down the best school. Dual language program is fantastic. The teachers and staff area team with each student. I feel welcomed every single time I go to the school. They make me feel like my daughter is important and they value her education. I drive 25 minutes to the school now that we moved and I would drive an hour if I had to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

There is a Spanish-English program starting in first grade; a good ratio of teachers to students.


Posted October 23, 2008

Ever Since my kid started going to woodin he has gotten smarter and he has never complained about his teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2007

When I first found out about Woodin's dual language program, I was thrilled to know that this opportunity existed in our school district. I have not been disappointed. I now have two children in the dual language program, and am astounded every day by their acquisition of a new language while still being challenged in their academics. The principal is extremely dedicated and approachable. She created this innovative program that uses its diversity as a stength and a focus of learning. The immersion idea necessitates added teacher support, which allows for excellent teacher student ratios. The teachers are dedicated and excited. My only complaint has been about the access to advanced cirriculum. Once EAP becomes available in this district (not until 3rd grade), it is housed in specific schools which requires that we make a choice between dual language and advanced cirriculum. However, I believe this is a district/policy problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2007

Friendly, Careful teachers. Excellent billingual education programs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2007

Woodin is an excellent school with a dedicated and caring principal and staff. Teachers go above and beyond to meet the unique needs presented by very bright students. The dual language program is an excellent example.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2007

My children have attended Woodin Elementary for the past 9 years. I have seen tremendous growth and positive change during this time. The current principal is outstanding in all respects. Her expectation for excellence has improved the academic experience for all students. The teachers/staff are exceptionally dedicated. The PTA has a strong presence and supports the staff/students/parents in a variety of ways. Resources are always a challenge, but that is a reflection of the lack of commitment from the State Legislature to adequately fund education in our state. The diverse culture of the school is possibly it's greatest asset. Children work with peers from a variety of ethnic/economic backgrounds. A climate of understanding and acceptance is actively cultivated at Woodin. This is an important part of the education of our children. Overall, Woodin provides an excellent environment for learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2007

I have been very pleased with the quality of the education at Woodin. I have found them very responsive and interested in teaching children at each child's level and not just teaching to the middle 50 percent. In Kindergarten they had a reading specialist come in to the class to help devise a plan so that all the children were being challenged with their reading because there were so many different ability levels. I think they really pay attention to each individual child. The teachers are excellent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

Woodin Elementary is an excellent school. and it is even better with the addition of our new music teacher. She is fabulous and has renewed everyone's interest in music. So far all teh taechers have been excellent although I think the work could be more challenging. They are doing a great job with having reading be at the right challenge and now they need to do the same thing with math. PTA is active and everywhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2006

I've been disappointed in this school. First of all, there's no gifted/talented program; kids who are way ahead of any others are left to twiddle their thumbs. Communication with parents is fairly weak. Some teachers are making a great effort but we are going to private school next year; the opportunities for real learning are too scarce and inconsistent here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2006

My daughter is in the dual language program at Woodin. I love that she is learning Spanish and she has learned quite a bit. The only downside is the lack of parental involvement in the school. I also believe that there should be more help in the classroom due to the wide range in the abilities in the kids due to the language differences and cultures. Overall a positive experience. Everyone is very friendly and the kids are well behaved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2006

Both my daughters have gone here for 2years, 1st & 2nd and the other 3rd & 4th so far the school has been good, no advance learning for accelerated children though.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

I have a child that has attended this school for almost 3 years. She was in a previous Northshore school. In my opinion there needs to be more envolvment from the Principal. I have been at more school functions then her. I beleive she needs to promote her school. Take the school on under your wings like i have seen other principals do. As you see from the school ratings we arent in the top ten. or even 20...I hope to see Ms Crivelo at more events introducing the performance letting the parents get to know her. Better yet at least review your own school that you have been at for 5 plus years...
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female72%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic35%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income37%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female86%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic62%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income57%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited English23%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female64%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic38%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income45%
Not low income69%
Special education59%
Not special education61%
Limited English33%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female80%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic45%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income48%
Not low income84%
Special education65%
Not special education73%
Limited English25%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students61%
Female64%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic41%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income34%
Not low income75%
Special education59%
Not special education61%
Limited English25%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students77%
Female76%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic60%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income59%
Not low income84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female88%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic72%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income73%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students85%
Female82%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic68%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income68%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students86%
Female91%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income76%
Not low income95%
Special education36%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female85%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic68%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income67%
Not low income92%
Special education36%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 48% 60%
Hispanic 34% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 7%
Two or more races 5% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 117%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 235%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 63%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jill Crivello

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
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12950 NE 195 St
Bothell, WA 98011
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 408-5400

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