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GreatSchools Rating

Lynnwood High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted September 18, 2013

This is school is amazing! I would know because use to go there. Has incredible teachers and is a very spirited students!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 23, 2013

My child was a freshman last year. Before this school his grades have always been outstanding. He will not be returning to this school for his next year. If he does he will be so far behind that there will be no way for him to catch up. Lynnwood High is telling students and parents that if their students are having a hard time Scriber Lake High is a good alternative. However, it has a rating of 2 on the Great Schools website. It just makes me wonder why would they suggest such a school that has such a low rating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2012

Great school! Very positive experience. There are some amazing and supportive teachers at this school. High school is what YOU make of it.


Posted August 2, 2011

I am currently a student at Lynnwood High School and have been for the past 2 years. In these past 2 years I have maintained a decent GPA and yet I don't feel like I have learned anything at all. The teachers are really just there to tell you what to do and to hand out work, when it comes to explaining the material the teacher doesn't teach you, the paper the teacher HANDS OUT teaches you. The administration is very unreasonable as well. The disciplinary, principal, and vice principial are especially hard to reason with and force unnecessary restrictions towards the students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2010

Lynnwood is amazing. I am a senior here, and I have moved nine times and I have been to seven different schools, and this is the one, that really pushed me to reach my full potential. If it wasn't for my teachers, I would still be the wallflower who didn't know how to interact with anyone. But now, I am confident, I am in the drama class, I am part of the student body, and I am a leader. The teachers at Lynnwood, really care about the students, and they make it so that they can recall any student by their name and what they do at the school. They ask me how I am, what I have going on, and what I am interested in. My fellow students are involved in so much, and we are all so different. Lynnwood, is extremely awesome, and it means a lot to me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 28, 2010

I really like this school, it has improved a lot since we have a better building. In fact it is the best building on the west coast now because it's a green school. Also it has a lot of races and that's important because students are more open minded. There are a lot of really great teachers and all are nice. there are also a lot of clubs students can join or make up.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 11, 2010

This school doesn't care about education. New digs doesn't make you a better teacher or administrator. Ship 'em in Ship 'em out is the status quo. Wake up!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2010

This school really has nothing good about it. The teachers have a lack of experience gained at College & Universities. They really dont care about your learning and well being at the school. You pretty much need to figure out everything yourself, the teachers are there to give out the work. I really didnt like the school. Its not one of those friendly happy neighborhood schools. No one really cares about your learning as well as you. Wouldnt reccommend going to Lynnwood to anyone. I think most of the kids at the school will agree with me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2009

I love lynnnwood! its fun, even the learning part...
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 27, 2008

Good school with awesome activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2007

I'm a former student. Principle Leadership. Nonexistent. I've been at this school for less than a year, and I can tell you that out of the three high schools I've attended (Yokosuka, Snohomish, and this one) This was certainly the worst. For one, the lack of parental incentive to participate in their child's activities. The drama program there is actually fantastic. They set up more than the usual '2 shows' a year. When I was there we put up about 5 productions. Best times of my life. There are a few note worthy teachers out there, but not enough to justify going to this school. It's not only lackluster, but broken. Your child will be better somewhere else, trust me.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 13, 2007

As a junior at LHS, I have seen how students and staff have tried to change the overall image of the high school. It may not have the best reputation in the area but that doesn't there aren't students and teachers trying to fix it. The teachers are engaging and try their best to do everything they can to help students. The building has poor facilities but that will be changing in the very near future with a new building on the horizon. Parent involvement is relatively high in the school. There are multiple parents who volunteer their time tutoring students or doing other things around the school. The Booster Club is also fantastic about helping out kids who may need scholarships for athletic and other fees. Overall, it is a school on the rebound, just look at the test scores.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 7, 2006

I'm a student currently going there and hating it. I know I'm not supposed to hate but I couldn't find a better word. The academic I just started getting into but seems okay. They have music like guitar which I'm taking now. Sports, just the basic ones. Extracurricular activities yeah the have them but not many and not much of a variety. Parent involvement? None probably because they barely have any staff involvement. Like there isn't any supervision outside and there are no boundaries. Anything can happen then. Everyone talks on their cell phone. Overcrowded everywhere especially lunch. They're behind in technology. I saw a computer class, they have old computers. All the teachers' laptops don't work that well where they can actually use it. Very behind in stuff too like they just got planners.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 15, 2006

The extracurricular activities keep the children involved with school. Lacking in parent and teacher support and the quality of academic programs could be better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2006

Just what I've know since my daughter starting going to Lynnwood High, I would rate the school very low as well as the district. Instead of trying to help the students early on when they are not performing well (starting at 9th grade), this school and district just passing them to the next grade (now a Junior) and when they become Seniors and possibly have turned 18 they do not have enough credits to graduate which then gives a student a chance to drop out. Parents have no rights as far as having their child held back until they either get it or realize they will not go forward to the next grade. When did the district start telling parents what they can and can't do with their child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2006

This is a great school. My son especially liked the Biology program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2004

Our family spent six years at LHS with two kids. The overall experience was very positive. Like everything else in life you get out of it what you put into it. We met a number of exceptionally dedicated teachers, coaches and staff. There is a counselor at the school that has had inappropriate involvement with students and continues to work with at risk kids. As such I can't give the leadership high marks. But what I did find with LHS is that the parents and kids are among the most involved I have ever seen. The atmosphere is one of family. We have been out of the school for two years now and look back on our time there fondly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 21, 2004

The administrators are cynical, hardened, and burned out. They are disrespectful to the students and parents. The few well meaning, good teachers at this school face a wall of indifference from the administration which in turn creates cynical, hard teachers. The attempts to help my children graduate are great on paper, but never materialize in practice. We would place our children elsewhere, but all the other high schools in Edmonds School District are closed. When our youngest is High School age we will be moving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2004

Lynnwood has many things to offer, but the friendly administration isn't one of them. My child has had many problems that have needed to be addressed a few times for them to correctly respond to it. There are a few exceptions to this, some of the teachers are nothing but friendly and caring that are optimistic. Overall, there are better choices in this area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2004

My experience with Lynnwood High School has been nothing but positive. The staff and administration have been very responsive to my child's needs and my concerns. I have three more children that will attend the school and I could not be happier. There is a balance of academic challenge and extra curricular opportunities that are inclusive not exclusive. A great school with a great staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

193 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
41%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

339 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
94%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
30%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
53%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

201 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
60%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
33%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students43%
Female39%
Male46%
Black33%
Asian59%
Asian/Pacific Islander57%
Hispanic24%
Multiracial35%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Low income37%
Not low income48%
Special education35%
Not special education43%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students71%
Female69%
Male73%
Black56%
Asian69%
Asian/Pacific Islander68%
Hispanic52%
Multiracial81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income62%
Not low income78%
Special education80%
Not special education70%
Limited English46%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students89%
Female92%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White93%
Low income79%
Not low income94%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students21%
Female20%
Male23%
Black8%
Asian32%
Asian/Pacific Islander32%
Hispanic8%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Low income16%
Not low income28%
Special education25%
Not special education20%
Limited English11%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students31%
Female29%
Male35%
Black15%
Asian36%
Asian/Pacific Islander36%
Hispanic14%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income31%
Not low income31%
Special education33%
Not special education31%
Limited English5%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students69%
Female66%
Male72%
Black56%
Asian54%
Asian/Pacific Islander56%
Hispanic60%
Multiracial55%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income65%
Not low income72%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited English44%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students12%
Female19%
Male6%
Black0%
Asian39%
Asian/Pacific Islander36%
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White0%
Low income9%
Not low income16%
Special educationn/a
Not special education14%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students33%
Female29%
Male37%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income44%
Not low income20%
Special educationn/a
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

371 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

382 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

358 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
48%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

378 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students85%
Female87%
Male83%
Black68%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic78%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income81%
Not low income89%
Special education62%
Not special education87%
Limited English35%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students93%
Female94%
Male91%
Black93%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanic89%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income89%
Not low income96%
Special education83%
Not special education94%
Limited English54%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 44% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 23% 7%
Hispanic 17% 20%
Black 8% 5%
Two or more races 7% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 110%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 248%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 71%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Music teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Orchestra

Language learning

Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • David Golden

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Music teacher(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Orchestra
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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3001 184th St SW
Bothell, WA 98012
Phone: (425) 431-7520

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