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GreatSchools Rating

Highline High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted June 22, 2014

This school and its staff need some serious improvement. As a parent of a student, I am very disappointed in the teachers as well as the office staff. Teachers do pick favorites and if your student is not one of them, then they are pretty much left behind and set up for failure. Instead of the teachers being about and for all of their students to succeed, they would rather pick a small handfull to give every opportunity to. Making it very difficult for students to feel their worth and come anywhere near their full potential. Borderline bullies, with authority is a good description of a few teachers. Office staff is very un-organized, and they are not in the least bit consistent. This school has gone down hill in the last few years. What once was a great school, is now a sad excuse for a place your kids go to waste 6+ hours of their day, five days a week. They definately need a complete overhaul on the building and 90% of the staff. I am very dissappointed in how my child was treated while attending, and the education she was "supposed" to receive along with the guidance, encouragement, and life readyness she was also supposed to receive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 18, 2013

this school is great very diverse, and the teachers i had were amazing and very supportive and available for extra help.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 13, 2012

I am a student at this school but perhaps it's a little difficult for me to write a proper review without having seen other high schools. I feel that many of the reviews on here are accurate, both the negative and positive ones. For instance: "[...]As a teacher myself, I am stunned by the lack of guidance by the school district." I feel that this is accurate to some degree. The administrative decisions that happen at highline are sometimes poorly planned or improperly implemented. The bell schedule is inconsistent. The administration is involved in academics, but loosely. They don't have the resources to manage each and every student's progress. They end up having to give overreaching advice and non-specific encouragement at assemblies and extra curricular gatherings. It is often difficult to find someone with spare time discuss things. Academics are rigorous should you chose to apply yourself, and relaxed otherwise. This year AP classes have been promoted quite a bit, and running start is always an option.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 11, 2010

Highline is an okay school. It's not a fantastic school, but it's not terrible either. Don't believe all the reviews on here, there is Bullying. I am a freshman at Highline, and I've already witnessed 4 fistfights. I've been asked if I wanted weed twice, and the windows in all of my classes are broken, scratched up, and have bullet holes in them. The teachers are okay, they're not great. And supplies is bad, everyone has to share books.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 17, 2009

My experience as a former student at this school is extremely negative. I've noticed little teacher involvement with their students academics, lack of organization amongst staff that resulted in unfair disadvantage's to students. and almost excessive student against student criticism. While Highline is an old institution and has proved it's worth in the past, it is time for a serious overhaul. New policies and higher expectations of teachers is necessary.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 11, 2009

Highline is the best school in our whole district! Maybe our test scores our low, but that's because people tend to skip school to hang out with friends instead. But our school spirit is amazing, nobody can deny that Highline students are truly proud and will go all out for your high school, even if we don't have the best athletic record. And there is no bullying; you never hear of any fights or arguments, because everyone is truly accepting of one another; we are one big happy family, and that's great! Personally, I think I made the right choice by going to Highline this year, and I'm proud to say that, yes, I DO bleed purple and gold :) Go Pirates!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 10, 2008

well..I LOVE hhs. its the best high school ever. the campus is great and very well organized. the teachers are fantastic-theyre always there for you wether its school related or not. the students are wonderful-nobody 'bullies' anybody or anything. its like one big happy family =]
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 21, 2008

Highline H.S. has exceeded our expectations in providing excellent programs and options for our daughter. It has been very supportive of her academic goals.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 23, 2007

This school is great. It has the best teachers and I love it! The campus is great and the students are wonderful
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 29, 2007

What concerns me about this school is that the teachers seem relatively uninterested in student progress. This could be because pay is low, or due to a lack of leadership, as the principal often sets the tone for the level of faculty/parent interaction. With retirement looming, I sense the principal's foot is off the gas pedal, and children are getting less as a result. I've had kids at three different high schools... unfortunately, of the three, this one seems to have the lowest expectations of both teachers and students. C'mon, Highline...you can do better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2007

Some teachers know what they are talking about and others don't.It really depends on the teacher that you get. Sporting activities at the school are great and very competitive. I didn't always feel safe walking through the halls.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 8, 2006

This school does nothing to help the children that need it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2005

I am not impressed with administration. School lacks instruction in Mathematics; not enough educational materials for each classroom. Disorganization for school enrollment; class scheduling. School does not challenge students who may be ahead in one subject but at grade level in another. Setting the students up to fail from the beginning of the 9th grade for the wasl. When I went to school, there were 6 classes a day, not this every other day or three weeks on, three weeks off garbage. Students don't retain the information unless it's daily. As a teacher myself, I am stunned by the lack of guidance by the school district.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 11, 2005

In my opinion I think that Highline High School is a great school for student learning. The quality of academin programs are really progressing. I also think that the availability of music, art, sports and other extracurricular activities are also progressing and alot of students are involving in some of these subjects. I belive that more parents should be involved in what there children are doing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2003

Highline is a great school to attend. One of its great perks is that it has a close relationship with the community college which allows kids to go to HCC in their junior year of their high school. The second most wonderful thing about the school is that it is one of very few schools who is on a semister schedule, meaning with four period days, you would complete what is normally a full years math class in just 10 weeks. This allows for a fresh start for students every semister and gives students many more credits than a different institution. Look into it, you will like it.


Posted August 19, 2003

The teachers at Highline High school are wonderful, most of them will go the extra mile to help their students and also to make learning fun. The downside to Highline, is the Principal, who isn't very involved with her students and doesn't really make an effort to get to know them.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
29%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
42%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
9%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

273 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
35%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

161 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
23%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
43%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
29%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students39%
Female41%
Male38%
Black33%
Asian54%
Asian/Pacific Islander50%
Hispanic35%
Multiracial41%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income33%
Not low income54%
Special education21%
Not special education41%
Limited English18%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students19%
Femalen/a
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education23%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students77%
Female89%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
White88%
Low income77%
Not low income76%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students12%
Female13%
Male10%
Black0%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander30%
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White14%
Low income12%
Not low income10%
Special education9%
Not special education13%
Limited English5%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students46%
Female44%
Male49%
Black26%
Asian52%
Asian/Pacific Islander46%
Hispanic34%
Multiracial43%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income36%
Not low income66%
Special education6%
Not special education51%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students50%
Female51%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asian58%
Asian/Pacific Islander52%
Hispanic51%
Multiracial36%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income50%
Not low income50%
Special educationn/a
Not special education52%
Limited English29%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students9%
Female14%
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic20%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White0%
Low income13%
Not low income0%
Special education0%
Not special education13%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students20%
Female18%
Male22%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic11%
Multiracialn/a
White36%
Low income12%
Not low income30%
Special educationn/a
Not special education24%
Limited English10%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

307 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
29%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

298 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
76%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

322 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
24%

2010

 
 
30%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

272 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students74%
Female79%
Male69%
Black74%
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic65%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income70%
Not low income82%
Special education30%
Not special education80%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students60%
Female69%
Male52%
Black62%
Asian66%
Asian/Pacific Islander69%
Hispanic51%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income55%
Not low income68%
Special education14%
Not special education66%
Limited English3%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 36% 20%
White 29% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 13% 7%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Black 8% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 112%N/A8%
Special education 114%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 264%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 58%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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225 South 152nd St
Burien, WA 98148
Phone: (206) 631-6700

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