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GreatSchools Rating

Cashmere High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted March 17, 2014

I am a graduate from Cashmere and im hoping to move back so my kids can go to Cashmere. I have nieces and nephews that have all graduated from Cashmere. I work as an educator and have seen several schools in the state and out. Every School has flaws and people who will bash schools are because their "child was wronged" or they hated school when they were there. This is the same issue in all schools. What i do know about Cashmere Schools is yes it is an athletic school that takes pride in their programs. I wasnt a jock and I was treated just like the jocks were treated. I currently live 3 states away and would love my children to be a Cashmere Bulldog! So if you read the negative reviews take them with a grain of salt and remember ALL schools have there issues. Cashmere is amazing and I give it 5 stars!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 2, 2013

I went to this school district K-12th grade. After entering the real world I felt prepared and ready for college, although I did struggle at times. The best thing I liked about Cashmere, especially at the High school level was the opportunity to make my education. I was very self determined and Cashmere allowed me to take my skills and soar. I was very involved in extra curricular activities including theater, sports, and ASB. I have daughters who will start kindergarten this year and I hope to find a school district like this one. I think with many small towns you will always have those 'cliques' which is a struggle at times, and of course there is the downside to having a little less opportunities than say a 4A school. I also felt that there were a lot more teachers (mostly older tenured) that didn't seem to care about the subjects they were teaching (again I'm thinking middle/high school level) while others went above and beyond for their students. Cashmere has been known for their athletics and I'm proud to say I was a Bulldog, but they also have a great theater and music department. It is all in all a well rounded school in a lovely community.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 3, 2012

Cashmere school district is FABULOUS! I am a former student of all three schools! Now, I am a parent! Still love Cashmere schools! My oldest should have graduated 2010 but decided to make bad choices but even though he wasn't a jock persay, the school staff was still always very supportive and tried to help keep my child on track. Lots of parent involvement and close community. Yes sports are high here but academics hold high expectations too. They want to see kids succeed! Along with sports being important because kids need the disipline that sports teach! If your not a jock just get involved that is all the school wants to see! :-)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2012

I personally attended Cashmere High School. As a student if you are not a "JOCK" then the teachers dont look at you the same, this is the worst High School I have ever been to. I also attended Waterville and Eastmont but Waterville takes the cake. Certain teachers that are too old to understand what kids are going through as they get older greately affects the teacher to kid relationship. How are you supposed to look up to and want to immulate someone that is way too old to comprehend what they are trying to teach. The biggest problem is not the kids, food, or security it definately is that the "Seniority" of the faculty plays too big of a role which in turn keeps teachers in the school that should have quit a long time ago.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 1, 2010

My son went here for 1 year he and that was more that enough. You better support and involve the sports and sport jocks in this school because they glorify them. They have a good old boy network and your expected to just go along with it. Teachers and administration are just like the clicks in high school, they address things only when it makes them look good, so you better be popular!???
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2009

The administraation tends to deny that problems exist with regards to student conduct and safety.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2009

Cashmere school has it s good and bad points but Iv sent 5 children to this school and they all did well , Parent involvement helps a lot, the staff is great if you get to know them..and students are great Ive never seen a group of kids more accepting of handicapped or special needs kids any were. These kids care, in today's world that is huge.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2008

I went through the Cashmere school system from Kindergarten all the way through 12th grade. This was an amazing experience. Cashmere has an incredibly involved community! People were constantly willing to lend a helping hand, or encourage you in any type of way. The teachers within the school system are working to better the education of the students and not just to get a paycheck. Sports are a big deal in Cashmere, only because we have very high excelling athletes, but our drama, band, choir, and much more are also high excelling. All of our programs are great! I would give my highest recommendation to the Cashmere School District and would advise anyone to feel safe sending their children there and know that they will indeed succeed with flying colors!!


Posted October 27, 2008

I seriously believe Cashmere High School is one of the best schools, both academically and sports-wise. I only play one sport and am a 3.5 GPA student. The teachers at CHS are encouraging and ready to help at any time. I really enjoy going here and would never move to a different school. :-D
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 20, 2008

I pulled two of my high school students out of the Wenatchee schools and put them in CHS. They are both very different. One is athletic and one is not. One is good in academics the other is not. I have nothing but respect for the students and staff at CHS. My only regret is thata I didn't change sooner. other is not. They are so much happier at CHS. I have nothing but respect for the students and staff at CHS. Iy was
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2007

great school! I love CHS!!!! Greatest school ever!! A great place to be
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 9, 2007

My daughter attended this school for a short time before I withdrew her to home school her. If your child is athletic or able to maintain a high grade they will fit in. I will not allow anymore of my children to attend this school. The teachers for the most part are very good, my problem deals primarily with the administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2006

I have two children who have attended high school at Cashmere. Both of them did well there. They received good instruction, particularly in Spanish, music, drama, math, science and English. I think that it helped that both of them were good in athletics. I think that the administration and some of the teaching staff could be more sensitive to diversity. The staff is not particularly racially diverse. The staff could play a crucial role in helping the community learn about tolerance and the gift of diversity. This will happen only with the administration's leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2006

I have gone to Cashmere Schools my whole life. Our school is just encouraging. I personally don't play sports and I don't feel like I am treated any differently than my friends that are in sports. I believe if you are looking for a school for your child Cashmere is one of the best around.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 10, 2006

CAshmere is the only school I have gone to and its wonderful. the environment and i know most of my classmates.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 5, 2004

As a graduate of CHS, I can see that the current leadership (principal) is not particularly interested in being one of the best schools in the state as in past years. He appears to not be interested in anything other than the power that he has over staff and students. If you are not an athlete, chances are, you do not exist. You will exist even less as a minority at this school. However, the staff try and mostly do an excellent job of teaching and I would consider them outstanding!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 18, 2004

The Cashmere School District is an okay place to go to school for children. It has it's up's and down's just like any other school in the state. The one thing that I would like to see the school pay less attention to is sports. The whole school is based on playing after school sports and I would also like to see the coaches stay the same for a couple years. As I know my daughter has played Girls Basketball her 3 yrs of her high school career, and it seems every year there is always a new head coach. I frown upon this very much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2004

I've had two graduates from CHS in the past several years. Both were 12-year students in the system, and both were very happy their ordeal was over. The entire district is managed toward the middle, and if your student is gifted, he/she will not be provided a truly college preparatory experience, you'll have to do that yourself. Leadership is sorely lacking at all levels, and is managed not for the kids' benefit, but to maintain power and control, even where a little freedom would be educational. If your child is good at sports, he or she will get good grades and do well socially. If not, your child may be in for an unfulfilling experience. This system receives one of the highest rates of tax revenue per child in the state, and does so little with it, it is shameful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2004

Sports are emphasised greatly, but the atmosphere is nice in that no one can go completely unnoticed. Though the review says that we have 100% internet access, the server is often down. I advise more diverse classes that don't involve sports.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 10, 2004

My wife and I have two kids who graduated from Cashmere High School a number of years ago but we keep abreast of what's happening there. We continue to be impressed with the quality of Cashmere schools. No school district is perfect but I don't know of any district that's better than Cashmere.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
55%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
98%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
46%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
58%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
74%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
18%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students47%
Female41%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Low income38%
Not low income62%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students96%
Female92%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low income92%
Not low income100%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students17%
Female18%
Male16%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic15%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Low income17%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education17%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students57%
Female61%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income46%
Not low income69%
Special educationn/a
Not special education58%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students67%
Female64%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income58%
Not low income80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students16%
Femalen/a
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income17%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education18%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

117 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
50%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

101 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students84%
Female88%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income74%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female93%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income81%
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 66% 60%
Hispanic 30% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 15%N/A8%
Special education 17%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 242%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 15N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 71%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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329 Tigner Rd
Cashmere, WA 98815
Phone: (509) 782-2914

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