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GreatSchools Rating

Centralia High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted October 28, 2012

The teachers here tend to be pretty good. Unfortunately, the administrators for this school and those for the entire district are extremely far right. This mindset tends to favor Christians and middle class white people and target the poor and especially the minority poor.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2009

I love this school. The teachers are great. And so is the cirriculum. The classes are a little big, but the teachers make time for every student to see them personally. If requested.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 12, 2007

The administration and teachers target students that they perceive as being low-income, untraditional, or troublemakers. These are the students that should receive the most support, but at CHS the strategy is invest resources in the docile, the middleclass and athletic and try to eliminate the rest by harassing them with disciplanry threats, poor educational delivery, and exluding them from scholarship and leadership opportunities. It is a long pattern. I was fortunate to have a parent that was involved. She advocated for me when CHS tried to suspend me after I was out sick - they refused to believe my Dr.'s note was real! Unfortunately, the youth without active parents in their lives are often the ones targeted because it is easy prey. Schools should not set kids up for failure and all youth should have an equal opportunity to a quality education.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 11, 2006

I think the school's ok. Not the best but not the worst. Theres not alot of things to do after school for the students. The clubs are very limited.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 16, 2005

I was a student at Centralia High School, and I absolutely loved my time there. The teachers are all friendly, and care about the students' progress in their classrooms. If a student needs help, the teachers are more than willing to spend the extra time to help them out or find them a tutor if he or she requests one. The sports programs are all very strong. I specifically played soccer and fastpitch, and the coaching was excellent. My 4 years at Centralia High School were definitely some of the best years of my life.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 11, 2005

The administration and overall staff is unfortunately more interested in making the educational proccess less painfull for them as opposed to doing what is best for each individual student.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 21, 2005

I hated Centralia high school. It seems as though if your not up to a certain social standard the teachers could care less about you. I hated school for the simple fact a kid with a higher social status would get helped and the kids on the lower social standing like me would never get any help at all, so basically if your family doesn't have money you mean nothing to the school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 29, 2004

I am a former graduate of CHS, and I can honestly say I wouldn't have wanted to go anywhere else. I did have the advantage of taking advanced and honors classes, which is where you find the best teachers clasically. I participated in dramatics, leadership, and sports, all great experiences. I think you get out of a school experience what you put in, so this is a big part of why I viewed my experience so positively. I thought that for a small school, the teachers were fabulous and caring. Every single kid will remember Mr. Gilmore and many others who improved the quality of not only our education but our lives. I do have one last thing to say, if your kids stay out of trouble, you don't have to deal with the administration much. Teach your kids how to get the best from life.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 27, 2004

I am a former CHS Grade and had an excellent experience. However I have recently seen how the school has gone down hill. It starts with the administration, which I believe is one of the worst in the state. Unfortunately, the principal has driven away some of the top teachers and faculty members. I still have Tiger pride but I am very disappointed in what has happened to this school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 13, 2004

My daughter's friend, who attended CHS, recently passed away. She was more on the rebelious side, but overall a wonderful person and a tragic loss. The school barely responded at all to my daugther and her friend's grief. I am sure that if her friend was into sports and school spirit, they would have done much more. But they didn't. This school doen't realized the feelings of their students, and that is just wrong.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2004

I am very disillusioned by by the athletics at this school, especially the baseball program. I feel the coaches care more about winning at any cost than the individual students. Students who have lived in the district and worked through the program and are good athletes don't matter. Coaches care more about winning than academics and kids who stay away from drugs and alcohol. Also, apparently if you aren't tall enough or weigh enough you are worthless. It is sad that this is the message that is being sent. I can no longer support a school district that cares more about winning at all costs than the self esteem and integrity of students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 29, 2004

There are some awesome teachers at this school who really care about our kids' education. Not thrilled with the administration though.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2003

This is an ok school. Great teachers like Mr. Gilmore, Mrs. Althauser, Mrs. Thomas, and Mrs. Sande, You cant go wrong. There is a lot that could be improved though!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
9%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
54%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

248 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
55%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

161 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
26%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
66%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
33%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students41%
Female43%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income39%
Not low income45%
Special educationn/a
Not special education42%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students96%
Female97%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White95%
Low income90%
Not low income100%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students17%
Female21%
Male12%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic16%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Low income14%
Not low income24%
Special education7%
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students61%
Female58%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracial82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income52%
Not low income77%
Special education19%
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students76%
Female73%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income71%
Not low income84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students14%
Female9%
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic8%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White16%
Low income15%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education16%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students44%
Female39%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White60%
Low income50%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education44%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

228 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

257 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
72%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

238 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
40%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

245 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students71%
Female76%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic76%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income66%
Not low income81%
Special education38%
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students83%
Female87%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic80%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income81%
Not low income87%
Special education73%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 72% 60%
Hispanic 23% 20%
Black 2% 5%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 14%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 277%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 66%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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813 Eshom Rd
Centralia, WA 98531
Phone: (360) 330-7605

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