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GreatSchools Rating

Eatonville High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted April 6, 2014

First year at this school. Not how i expected high school to be like. Theres only about 500 people at this school, and theres probably about 450 kids who failed 1 or more classes for the semester. A lot of kids here are doing drugs too, sometimes right in class. I cant name one person who doesn't bring weed, ecigs, or tobacco to school. The teachers... Awful. There are some good ones, but overall they're horrible. A lot of them dint even care for the students at all. And also I actually had 2 teachers lie to my parents at the conferences, a lot of other people had the same problem like i had with that. Also the whole school thinks they're the best in the country just because it was remodeled and got some stupid distinction award, well that doesn't make the whole place better. So overall, this school is AWEFUL. If you're thinking of having your kid come to this school, don't have them. It is a really terrible school. The town of Eatonville is also terrible but thats a whole different story. So again. EHS is a bad school. Failing grades, drugs, non caring lying teachers,and much more, but i couldn't fit it all. So please don't come to this school or this town.


Posted July 5, 2013

I hated this school I attended for a school year and it sucked. Not because I needed to attend school but because the language used by the students was so profound it was scary. The teachers don't really monitor the students during lunch time. I don't think the teachers really cared. If your student tells you this school is horrible then it's true.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 20, 2010

I am concerned about the apparent split between the :in : group and the out group at the HS. The administration seems more concerned about his appearance than the kids. Lot's of bully issues and lots of struggling students. I just don't think these people have been taught how to help kids do well. They need to be more encouraging and not so bull headed. There needs to be a change in leadership in this entire school district
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2009

We are two Eatonville High school students. We have been through alot with this school from the remodeling to the bad administration. Most of the teachers are rude and uncaring. They also punish for no apparent reason. Don't get us wrong there are a couple good teachers that make the school worth it.But only a couple. Eatonville is not an outstanding school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 16, 2008

Eatonville was amazing. I owe my heart and soul to every instructor that took the initiative to help better my life and those I come in contact with. I can only hope the development of the district and influence it has over all life will continue to expand and grow with a benefit to all human kind.


Posted May 19, 2007

I have a child that is a currently attending Eatonville. We live in another school district but chose Eatonville H.S. over the H.S. in the district we live in b/c of the smallness of the student body and the hometown community feeling. We have found the teachers to be mostly great (there is always the exception). I do feel, however, that I have to be a little more diligent in who my child chooses as friends from this school, more so than other schools attended. I do feel like the teachers have the best interest of my child at heart at all times. Overall, I'm glad we made the change.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2005

We moved to Eatonville so that I could have a better environment as I entered high school. Instead we found a community and school system that is closed minded and a school administration staff that cares more about rules and looking good, then the students. A 2005 Eatonville Grad.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 7, 2005

I am a parent who has three children in Eatonville schools. I am very disappointed in the high school. I find that there are only a handful of really good teachers. Mostly fair to poor. The math department is the worst I have ever seen anywhere. There is not a teacher that a parent or students would say is a good teacher, teaching algebra 1 or above. The administration there seems to be overly bias against anyone with a different point of view. They seem to care more about the rules then the students; they don't help them learn from their mistakes they just punish them. If you speak up, you are worried that your child may become a target.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2004

I went to Eatonville High and my girls have gone to Eatonville schools also. I find Eatonville to be a good school. Safer than most maybe not the best for education but not the worst either. There WASL scores for the year are above the state average so it cant be that bad. I can't think of a better school for my kids to have gone to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2004

I attended EHS and found that the only good part about it were the teachers (mainly Mr. Dawkins and Mr. Houghee) and the drama club/class. The Administrators there were overly bias aginst anybody with a different view than them. I was expelled (temp) for a rumor that was started as a joke. I later had to fill out much paper work and do over 400 hours of community service to once again attend EHS. And when I was readmitted I was placed in a rather offencive outplacement (Home work class) that did absolutely nothing to further my education.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 5, 2004

I have three kids in this Eatonville schools. A child in each one. The teachers and other staff are very caring! The parents that go in to help are so wornderful to give their time. The education that they are getting is a good one. The teachers really apply themselves in to the leasons. The kids love them. There is mutual respect between the teachers and the kids. I can't thank them all enough for giving my kids a safe and caring place to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2003

My child benefited from a very talented and caring teaching staff at Eatonville High School. He loved high school and went to a very competitive college well prepared to meet the challenges there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

Our children attended Eatonville High School, Middle School and Elementary School. Due to a work transfer we left this district and went to another district. We returned to Eatonville to find our children so far advanced that they could not receive a decent education in Eatonville without doing running start and attending college courses. We received permission to attend an out of district school and found the curriculum that met our needs. The Eatonville school system is the worst we have ever seen or heard of.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2003

it is a good school my girl went there before she moved and she loved it it is a good school


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
65%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
24%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
63%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
92%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
47%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
79%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students42%
Female41%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income48%
Not low income39%
Special educationn/a
Not special education41%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Female92%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income92%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students13%
Female18%
Male8%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White16%
Low income4%
Not low income25%
Special educationn/a
Not special education15%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students71%
Female73%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income60%
Not low income76%
Special education75%
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students75%
Female82%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income75%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female15%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White19%
Low income8%
Not low income29%
Special educationn/a
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students44%
Female58%
Male27%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White47%
Low income64%
Not low income25%
Special educationn/a
Not special education44%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

151 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
37%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
73%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

165 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
49%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students84%
Female85%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income70%
Not low income92%
Special education39%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students84%
Female86%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income75%
Not low income89%
Special education23%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 87% 60%
Hispanic 5% 20%
Two or more races 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 235%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 15N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 69%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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302 Mashell Ave North
Eatonville, WA 98328
Phone: (360) 879-1200

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