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GreatSchools Rating

Maplewood Parent Coop

Public | K-8 | 479 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted Sunday, November 23, 2014

I love it except it gets annoying when you are there for over 3 years because you know everyone and sometimes those people don't like you or they are not like you.


Posted January 21, 2014

We are a family of the past 4 years at MW. Our experience thus far has been extremely positive. Our kids are either right on target or exceeding for their grade overall. The interaction with students, parents, and teachers is great. Support staff for kids who have additional needs is excellent, and all staff & admin. have open lines of communication with parents and each other. The work is fun, engaging, and challenging. Extra curriculars are improving. I've not found many issues with bullying. I know that the issue was addressed head on, and was emphasized last year with the school inviting Rachel's Challenge in-house. I've seen a difference in how older kids are treating each other, and teaching the younger kids. There do seem to be parental "cliques" that may spill over to the students, with gossiping and such,but it seems those groups gravitate toward each other in any social setting (church, work, etc.) and since so many parents work together here, it happens here too. I've noticed that there is a economic divide. I'm in the lower earning end, but I've not seen it paraded around in my face. They strive to make things fair for all students, affording opportunities to all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2010

I just read one of the most upsetting reviews. I feel for this former student. And hope that other parents read this and understand that they should communicate with their own child about their education. From our experience, teachers only push the children to accomplish things that they are capable of doing. As a former teacher, it makes me sad to hear that a student did not learn to deal with issues while in the midst of problems. Please learn from your past and be a major part of your child(ren)'s lives.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2010

As an educator in the Edmonds school district I feel lucky to have my children at Maplewood. My children are working above grade level academically. The teachers are dedicated and yes, they do push students to achieve what they are fully capable of. Isn't that what we want for our children? As for sports, the physical education teachers are extremely dedicated and spend much of their personal time working to help students be physically fit. Any programs not available here are easily found through rec programs or elsewhere. As for social issues, they are at all schools. The children here are polite and respectful. Yes, there are sometimes issues, but there always are with people who spend this much time together (even adults). These issues teach our children how to deal with real life situations. The parking lot gossip is a problem but you don't have to join in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2010

The teachers, the parental involvement, the art, Modd Squad, the facility, the community. The kids get a great educations BUT parents need to be involved in all aspects. It's not for everyone but I feel fortunate to be there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2010

As parents, you obviously want your kid to get the best educational experience out there. Maplewood, in that case, would be it. Now, if you want your kid to get the best educational, and social experience, that would not be it. The kids at this school usually are very 'stuck up', and high class. Which always leads to bullying, cliques, everything. The teachers push way too hard, which can be understandable, but they go over the line with it. I had more homework in my elementary years at that school, then all 4 years of high school. Although the kids would come off to be more mature, it's not true, they are too sheltered at this school. Over-all, I wouldn't put any of my kids in this school. It was a horrible experience for myself, and I really wish that my parents had put me into a public elementary school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 11, 2010

In any school, you will find what you look for. I have served at this school for 15 years and through 6 children. It can be alot of work but it is worth it. It is a very caring atmosphere, and every teacher is wonderful. Bacause there is so much parent involvement, there are few discipline problems, leaving the teachers free to teach. the support of programs is wonderful and the education is great. I am so glad my children had the opportunity to learn here. They are prepared academically and , in sportsmanship. The diversity they get with Maplewood Center is good as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2010

This school really is a sinking boat. I experienced quite a few problems that the principal didn't handle very well. She doesn't care about students safety and bullies.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 27, 2010

I agree that this school is a sinking boat. The principal is superficial and weak and certain staff should have a backbone and do/say what is right. When issues arise this school gets flustered and this is causing this school to sink. Certain changes in staff would help this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2010

It is good if you don't experience a bullying case. It is good if you don't care about the material competition among the students. It is good if you don't have any problem to against the principal. it is good if you only want to join in a co-op school. It is a sinking boat.


Posted October 7, 2009

great parents and students
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

It doesn't get any better than a community raising and educating your child! The best staff around!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2009

This is an excellent school. While there may be only 4 sports the percentage of participation of middle schoolers is over the top! I've been volunteering there for 9 yrs. They definately prepare the middle school students for high school & most of them are accepted into honors classes. Where else can you get the equivalent of a private education at a public school without the cost?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2009

Good for educational purposes, but is pretty bad for preparing students for high school. There are only 4 sports to play-track, XC, basketball, volleyball. This school is too sheltered, it is very easy to get in trouble at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2008

MW is a great school as parents & teachers are very involved. We're very happy. The involvement by parents can lead to some pretty serious cliques. Some parents think they r 'better than thou' & others gossip. But the environment helps you to know the kids & families that your child will be with for years. All in all - agreat experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2008

I taught ten years in a private school and Maplewood does nearly everything that school did but in a public school. The parents, teacher, and principal are all deeply involved in each and every student. Each is committed to making them the best they can be. I could not ask for more!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2007

I think that this school is excelent and the nicest school building that i have ever seen, wonderfull teachers and parents that I feel I can trust arround my child and the teachers love eac and every child that they have the privalege to teach.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2007

I was a student at Maplewood for all nine years that are offered. I am now a WWU, pre-med, and am maintaining a high GPA. I flew through highschool, and Maplewood is the reason. The teachers get involved because of the small class size, and I went on probably ten field trips a year. Having parents in the class made me more comfortable to ask questions, 'mom, how can i remember the times tables better?' There are definetly clicks, but I made life long friends here. This is a top notch academic school. I admit that when I got older, I felt watched over a little too much, but now that I am removed for Maplewood, my kids will go to a co-op. My parents knew all my friend's parents, and that is a great comfort. I would say their activities were on par with other schools in the area.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 8, 2007

Maplewood is not for everyone, but if you can consistently volunteer one morning or one afternoon per week per child, you reap the benefit of seeing what small groups led by an adult can accomplish. Students seldom off-task and disciplined by the multitude of ever-present parents results in a student body that is respectful and engaged. Teachers are top-notch and spend many extra hours ensuring great lessons. It is a school that is working on cultural diversity, but in the mean time, relies on partnering with Maplewood Center's disabled students to provide more one-on-one care for them. There is a good mix of economic/social diversity and a strong community feeling present. Above all, this school recognizes the importance of involved parents and parents get to know everyone their child interacts with, whether teachers or students or parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2006

You can't find a much better academic program outside of private schools and the challenge program than Maplewood. The teachers are challenging, and prepare the children well for high school academics, except in one academic department. However socially it will not prepare the student. The students in middle school to seem to have to abide by the same very very strict roles that the first graders follow. The very small size leads to a great lack in diversity (ethnically, religiously, economically), and the students tend to be remain in their close group of friends, with very very gossipy parents. It tends to be very strict and conservative, and the parents are always watching, coupled with the size, leads to a lack of opportunities and especially growth for most of the students.Its too sheltered and 'safe' for a middle school. It doesn't help The students in the real world -grad '02
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
88%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
91%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female90%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female97%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female92%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students85%
Female89%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female94%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students97%
Female97%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students90%
Female88%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low incomen/a
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students85%
Female85%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female92%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female100%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female96%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students93%
Female96%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students91%
Female100%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female97%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female97%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students93%
Female94%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 60%
Hispanic 6% 20%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 17%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 46%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Michelle Jacobs-Mathis

Programs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School leaders can update this information here.

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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8500 200th St SW
Edmonds, WA 98026
Phone: (425) 431-7515

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