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GreatSchools Rating

Edmonds Home Resource Center

Public | K-12 | 515 students

We are best known for creative and engaged students.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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7 reviews of this school


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Posted February 11, 2014

Absolutely wonderful teachers, parents and kids who understand and are very tolerant of special kids from all specters. There have been severe ADHD, ODD, Spectrum, Social Anxiety, and mentally handicapped children here, as well as functionally normal and gifted. I have never seen a teacher or fellow student tease or bully another kid despite all the differences. Highly recommended, my son loves school and has developed social skills in a safe environment. He used to hate school and waking up every morning. The variety of classes and electives really help kids engage. Teachers know how to work with all kinds of kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2012

In this school, he has gained his happiness, confidence, and ability to self-regulate through POSITIVE reinforcement from teachers and peers. The teachers here understand a variety of student disabilities, and base student progress on their own individual growth rather than in comparison to other students in their class. There is no bullying, and the older kids really set a great example of how to treat the younger kids. My son was so unhappy and bullied by students in his previous school. He came home angry and frustrated every day. His teachers relegated him to the back corner of the classroom for 2/3rds of the day there. Academically, we spent so much time after school doing homework yet he still failed his 4th grade Science MSP. This last year at EH he got 4s (A's) in ALL areas tested on MSP! This school offers a variety of classes incl. robotics, legos, computer, diverse music (theater), martial arts, dance, etc. to keep students engaged and motivated to do well in the more traditional subjects. Highly recommend this school for involved and dedicated parents who want happy successful kids who don't (or do) fit into a regular school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2011

Edmonds Heights (Homeschool, Alternative School, Cyber School) has been a wonderful experience for our family! It has changed our lives. Learning can be self-directed (or not!) There are fantastic resources from Theater to Mathematics, Music to Latin. Students can move at their own pace and are able to choose and focus on areas of interest. Excellent staff assist in everything from academics to budgeting of time, money and resources. Here, the sky is the limit and kids enjoy learning, living and interacting with people of all ages. Family is emphasized, as are creativity and independence! Hands on & visual learning are always options. It's the best educational set up I've seen in my 25 years as a certified teacher both in the public and private sector. Our children are thriving here!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2010

EHRC Is esceellent. THe staff students and organization help provide first class education. I am so impressed with the quality. Edmonds has done well!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Excellent teachers, classes and families that attend, we love our school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2007

This is an exceptional alternative to traditional schooling. It offers a wonderful mix of classes. I just can't say enough about the classes and the instructors. It also frees our schedule to travel and do many of our basics in a shorter period of time. For those looking for an alternative, this is something to look at it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2007

I go to this school and I am happy with the selection of classes. I really enjoy the ASL class because the teacher is deaf. It is kinda hard 2 make friends because u r in classes with kids many grade below or above u. But I really like this 'school' it is an great resore 4 new homeschoolers and epirenced alike
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
16%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
32%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
23%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
24%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
37%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
13%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
17%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
28%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
28%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
40%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
16%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
43%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
18%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students37%
Female42%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low incomen/a
Not low income45%
Special educationn/a
Not special education41%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female69%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Low incomen/a
Not low income56%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students32%
Female25%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low incomen/a
Not low income40%
Special educationn/a
Not special education32%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female60%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low incomen/a
Not low income68%
Special educationn/a
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students35%
Female40%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low incomen/a
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education35%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students31%
Female35%
Male28%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Low income15%
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female54%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low income54%
Not low income69%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students49%
Female42%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low incomen/a
Not low income55%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students28%
Female23%
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low incomen/a
Not low income31%
Special educationn/a
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female59%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low incomen/a
Not low income66%
Special educationn/a
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students52%
Female52%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Low income54%
Not low income51%
Special educationn/a
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female72%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income69%
Not low income61%
Special educationn/a
Not special education62%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students50%
Female68%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Low income46%
Not low income51%
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female35%
Male20%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low incomen/a
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education29%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female54%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Low incomen/a
Not low income58%
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students41%
Female42%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low incomen/a
Not low income58%
Special educationn/a
Not special education42%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
59%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
67%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
73%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
50%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
77%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
40%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
34%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students45%
Female46%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White39%
Low incomen/a
Not low income53%
Special educationn/a
Not special education45%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students64%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special education64%

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students27%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White20%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education27%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students64%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students67%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White58%
Low incomen/a
Not low income73%
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students46%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education43%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students43%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income50%
Special educationn/a
Not special education43%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

20 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
21%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

25 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
17%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students81%
Female92%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income83%
Not low income80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students70%
Female83%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income50%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 72% 60%
Two or more races 13% 6%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 12%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 223%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Colleges most students attend after graduation University of Washington
Edmonds Community College
Shoreline Community College
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 45N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 5N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Foreign languages spoken by school staff Italian
Spanish
ASL
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • School of Distinction (2010)

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Clubs
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • ASL
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • ASL
  • Italian
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Danny Rock
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (425) 431-7849

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
  • Independent Study
  • Virtual school
Foreign languages taught
  • ASL
  • Latin
  • Spanish

Resources

Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • ASL
  • Italian
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Remediation
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Debate
Girls sports
  • Debate

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
More from this school
  • Edmonds Heights K-12 We serve families who choose to be primary educators by partnering with them in their students’ education. In study after study, researchers discover how important it is for parents to be actively involved in their child's education. – National Education Association People should be free to find or make for themselves the kinds of educational experience they want their children to have. - John Holt, homeschool advocate My grandmother wanted me to have an education, so she kept me out of school. – Margaret Mead, anthropologist We partner with families to: Help students succeed - We believe that parent leadership is vital to students’ success. Our parents plan, coordinate, deliver, delegate and evaluate their students’ learning. Edmonds Heights K-12 teachers and staff play a vital role of support and guidance while respecting the parents’ values and priorities. In our program, families own the education process. Set individualized learning goals - Every student is unique and deserves a personalized approach to education. Our parents and students create customized Written Student Learning Plans (WSLPs) that focus on each student’s passions and interests. Our certificated teachers and experienced support staff work one-on-one with families to support these plans and help students achieve their goals. Encourage excellence - By offering a variety of learning environments, we empower students to follow their passions and choose the learning experiences that work best for them. Options include traditional classrooms, workshops led by independent professionals, integrated subjects, technology-rich opportunities, onsite library, school clubs, excursions and trips, competitions and participation in national clubs and programs. Families are actively involved in planning these offerings; parents and students decide what resources they will use. Empower parents and students as teachers and leaders - All members of our community are encouraged to share their ideas and passions for learning. Informal social connections and relationships with other families provide important sources of companionship, support and inspiration. Co-ops, workshops, culminating projects, and special events are just some of the ways that individuals can more formally bring their gifts and experiences to the community. Our Associated Student Body and Leadership Council provide opportunities for student and parent leadership. Anyone with a new idea is encouraged to speak up! Connect to outside resources and real-world experiences - We believe that learning extends outside the classroom walls. Our students have opportunities such as learning to bowl at a neighborhood bowling alley, showing work at the Edmonds Arts Festival, sailing a historic schooner around Puget Sound, attending community college and earning college credits through Running Start. Celebrate our students’ successes - Our community takes great pride in our students’ achievements and we honor their work on our website and at a variety of events, such as our performing arts events, martial arts belt ceremonies, music and dance recitals, classroom presentations and celebrations, academic awards, Student Showcase, Field Day and year-end Commencement Ceremony. Explore post-graduation opportunities - Ultimately, our goal is to launch our students into lives of passion and opportunity. Our alumni include a fire fighter, professional dancer, computer analyst, nurse, pilot, minister, teacher and a circus performer. Some pursue further education through the military, apprenticeships, internships, trade programs, respected colleges and world-class universities. Many choose to travel, taking advantage of international student programs and cultural exchanges. Edmonds Heights K-12 community members provide a rich network of contacts and resources for helping students find inspiring opportunities. WSLP advisors offer ideas and guidance in their fields of expertise; our on-site counselor helps students assess their interests and aptitudes and connects them to career fairs, college information, vocational opportunities and other district resources.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
University of Washington
Edmonds Community College
Shoreline Community College
College preparation / awareness offered
Community college courses
College prep programs/courses during the year
College presentations or information sessions
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

23200 100th Ave West
Edmonds, WA 98020
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 431-7840

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