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GreatSchools Rating

Elma High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted July 8, 2011

All three of my kids are going to/have gone to Elma High School. They provide a lot of activities and classes that have helped prepair them for a solid future. They have the resources to help them in areas they struggled and help them to take advantage of their areas of strenght. They help prepair the kids for continuing education with college level classes or to go into the workforce with real world experience in different areas some of which include automotive classes, agriculture related classes, and even a student run business to get the real hands on experience - and that's not even half of their offerings. The kids graduate with a sense and awareness of community, reaspect, integrity, and self worth that you probably won't find in a big city school with high student to teacher ratios.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

My daughter graduated from Elma High School with a 3.5 grade avg,she loved all her teachers and they are the best,she is now in college and doing great there,if it were not for the teachers and staff at Elma she would not be where she is today,I just cn not say enough about the school. Thank You Phillip Haider.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2009

This school is pretty bad. It is full of people that are ignorant to the reality that the school teachers are failing not the students. Worst of all, almost all of the staff will not recognize it and just go on to the next paycheck. A huge lack of communication and motivation. On school spirit, this school has lost most of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2008

Elma is a place where kids can really find a place in this society. Where they can really express them selves in ways nobody thought of
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2008

Elma high school is a great school..the staff is amazing..there are some teachers i dont really like but thay are still amazing people..i love this high school and i wouldnt trade it for the world...the only thing that needs to change is the kids walking all over the teachers i know im a kid too but its bull===== so ya but its amazing:)
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 5, 2008

This school is the most unorganized school i have ever heard of. The will send you to six different people for one question, they dont know who is graduating or not, they dont help students as much as they like to think they do. as far as i am concerned the principle should be replaced...again
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 5, 2007

Elma is the greatest school in the entire world and has amazing new principals, amazing staff, just amazing everything. Our school spirit is phenemonal, and all students should go to elma=]
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 24, 2007

this school is a avrage school with pros and cons. I think there are many great students athleticly, educationaly and presonaly. the staff is great too. but there has been an issue about sports within the staff we now have one of the most athletic classes coming in. the issue has not helped teach our students how to handle a problem. but still our school is a sports school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 5, 2007

The education at the school is really good. I'm concerned about the principal leadership. They are overly strict and pin point certain students when it comes to discipline. They don't focus on the good, just the bad. The teachers are all well educated and ready to help the students out. There is a hugr lacking in extracurricular activities (other than sports).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2005

Great school, with excellent academic programs. I participated in Running Start while attending Elma High School, and it was an excellent oportunity.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 9, 2004

I think it is a great school. Yes, it does depend too much on it's sports but overall it is a great school to go to. All of the teachers seem to be really nice and try to help their students as much as possible.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 9, 2004

I think that the Elma High School is a great school. All of the teachers try to help you as much as possible. The whole staff is great! The school does depend too much on sports but I think that the sports are also very important.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 6, 2004

It's a great school to attend, but yes 90% of the school is all about athletics. Though after 2003 the school lost a great deal of their major athletes, especially in Football and Basketball. The school seems to be heading in a more educated direction instead of being all about athletics. The teachers are great, many of them always have a smile on their faces. This place has so many faces on the staff that it's hard to pick your favorite.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 5, 2004

This school has some good points and some bad points. This school depends way to much on their sports. They need to realize that there are a lot of other things at this school that need help, too. The arts program, band and choir, are in need of help and they maybe dont realize it. But, the grades are fairly good and the teachers are mostly helpful.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 20, 2004

This school has some good points as well as negative points about it. The positive is that they have: a very good computer, athletic, and environmental studies labs. The Principle and most of the instructors are genuine in trying to encourage good studying and learning habits. The negative aspects include: The school encourages athletics more so than the other extra-curricular programs of the school. Funding or encouragement in subjects as Creative Writing and Native American Studies are lacking. For example: the Native American Studies Instructor was fired and no replacement was found till about three years later. One year after I had graduated. Students that participate a lot in school life as well as have good academics tend to receive more recognition more frequently than other qualified candidates at school events. Assisting victims of bullying and harassment, from other students, and even instructors is inadequate and needs to be addressed.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
56%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
67%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
64%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
89%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
63%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students69%
Female71%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Low income71%
Not low income67%
Special educationn/a
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students20%
Female23%
Male14%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White14%
Low income18%
Not low income22%
Special education17%
Not special education22%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students56%
Female57%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic41%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income49%
Not low income61%
Special education17%
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students80%
Female80%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income77%
Not low income82%
Special education40%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White60%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education60%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

132 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
29%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

163 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

158 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
38%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students73%
Female82%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income63%
Not low income80%
Special education26%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students73%
Female83%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic68%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income66%
Not low income78%
Special education34%
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 60%
Hispanic 12% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 7%
Black 0% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 251%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 15N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 78%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1011 West Main
Elma, WA 98541
Website: Click here
Phone: (360) 482-3121

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