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GreatSchools Rating

Federal Way Public Academy

Public | 6-10 | 63 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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35 reviews of this school


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Posted Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Having done some research, I see that there is a misconceptions about the teachers at FWPA. I just have to say that it's not that they pick favorites and purposely try to make the lives of those who struggle miserable, they try to help and want to see their students succeed. I had problems with the material in 6th and 7th grade. Yes, the teachers constantly nudged me to work harder and it was tiresome, but I'm so glad they did. Thanks to Mrs.Whisenhunt, and Mr. and Mrs.Tarling, I've developed great work ethics.


Posted May 22, 2014

Safe school in terms of gangs and drugs, but teachers tend to play favorites and makes kids feel bad. Do not send your kids to this school if your child is not willing to sacrifice their own social and athletic life for some college prep school with teachers who went to a community college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2014

I go to FWPA currently, and the ASB President, Boomer Lusink, is very good at his job and truly an extraordinary person.


Posted August 6, 2013

The atmosphere is wonderful. Small schools like this help develop some really amazing traits in a human being. Not only does it develop great academic skills, but you can really learn how to socialize on a more personal level.


Posted August 6, 2013

FWPA is by far the best school in the Federal Way School District and one of the best in the State of Washington. My children worked hard there, learning to set high academic standards for themselves in a small, safe school community where every teacher knows and promotes the growth of every student. The values of hard work, respect for others and community service they learned at FWPA have been rewarded by admission to top-ranked college programs and a personal sense of accomplishment for each of them. Most importantly, FWPA instilled a strong motivation in each to improve the world, and I'm confident that they will. We need more schools like FWPA!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2013

I attended FWPA from grades 6 to 10 and absolutely loved it. The school has a wonderful sense of community as well as great academics. The teachers truly care about students and want them to succeed, which unfortunately isn't the case at many schools. Of course, it's important to note that, because FWPA's designed for college prep, academic expectations are high. The transition to FWPA's workload is almost always difficult, but I can assure you, totally worth the struggle. I graduated from FWPA in June and have taken and succeeded in two writing-based courses at Harvard this summer. I've even been praised by professors for the lucidity of my prose (which I accredit to FWPA.) I'm also more advanced in math and more knowledgeable about science than many peers. One other common concern about FWPA is that it doesn't provide P.E. classes (credit must be earned outside of school) or many physical activities (which is true.) I've never been very engaged in sports, so the fact never presented a personal issue. However, several friends were involved in soccer, golf, and volleyball, and succeeded in those activities (winning and placing highly at tournaments) as well as at school.


Posted August 5, 2013

FWPA is a great school if you want to be there. There are great teachers, kids, and a fantabulous environment. It's really small, which I like because everybody is able to know each other and the teachers are able to get to know you better, therefore being able to better teach you. Obviously the education quality is excellent. Just take a look at our test scores. If you are considering going to FWPA, take a tour of the school. That's what I did. Before I went I had no interest in going to middle school at FWPA, but after an orientation thingy I decided that no other school would do.


Posted August 5, 2013

I went to this school for 5 years and had a wonderful experience. I was able to challenge myself intellectually while forming lasting bonds with friends and teachers. However, this school is not for everyone and is not easy. If you want to pursue sports this can be a difficult path to take, but it is not impossible. I would definitely recommend FWPA to anyone, as it is one of the most accepting, kind, challenging, fun, and interesting schools and I was very fortunate to attend it. If one is willing to work hard and make the most out of their time, they would surely benefit and have a wonderful experience at FWPA!


Posted August 4, 2013

This is a fantastic school! The school would be a perfect "10" if it developed the whole child. Certainly is not for everyone, but it's an exceptional school.


Posted May 27, 2013

My two children loved this school and elected to remain there for all five years (grades 6 through 10). They benefited enormously from the small school size, friendly atmosphere, and intense academics, as well as a principal and staff committed to the welfare of each student. It is truly an intense college prep environment - not for every student. If you (or your child) is not willing to work very hard and do hours of homework each night, go to another school. If you work hard, do your homework, and use the study skills FWPA teaches, you'll succeed. My older daughter, who is now graduating from high school, was admitted to a top college thanks largely to the study skills she learned at FWPA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2011

I have attended FWPA since 6th grade. and OMG yess i love it. Ok, so a lot of people say that the grades dropped as soon as they got into FWPA and they are blaming...what?..the school? Uhh whyy? It's a school that challenges students. If you didn't want a challenge then don't come in the first place . Our school is like no other it is so unique. ENJOY.


Posted January 23, 2011

I am a student at FWPA and I've been there since 6th grade. Not once have I ever regretted staying because I absolutely love it there. Sure we have a lot of homework, but it's all preparation. You can't get to the best schools being coddled. There are a decent amount of after school activities and people can always start clubs with approval from the teachers. I think this is the one school with a true family atmosphere. The teachers genuinely care, and they're more like friends who can help you with their experience and knowlege. I've met a lot of friends from all grades, it's hard not to know somebody at FWPA. Some reviews complain that they're child's grades dropped but whose fault is it really? It's definitely not the school who is just trying to help their students be succesful in life. I totally recommend this school!


Posted January 14, 2011

This school challenged me and was the best possible prep for college. I haven't found an academic environment as good in any other high school I've heard about or visited.


Posted October 9, 2010

We love this school! My son attended FWPA from 6th through 9th before moving into the IB Program at Thomas Jefferson. Mr. Lauer and the staff there were incredible and the academic progress my son made in those years helped him get into a great university with solid skills. I'm stunned that there are students and parents complaining about FWPA concentrating on academics. Students actually have to choose to go to FWPA and there is a long waiting list every year. If you didn't understand what the FWPA charter was, you shouldn't have signed up and prevented other students from attending who actually wanted to succceed academically.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

this school i believe is the most horrible excuse as a school. the teachers are always picking favorites. yes it's like family there ONLY if your asian. they (the teachers and students) are not accepting to other culture they are always biased and offending. i did not like it one bit and i encourage ppl NOT to go there.


Posted May 5, 2010

As a school board director looking for quality programs. I was very impressed by this school. Student involvement appears to be one of respect for each other and their school. I observed students interacting in class rooms and hall ways without adult suprevision and respecting each other. Plants throughout the school which would never last in our district. Qualtity of education can be proven with factual statistics. Ron Morehouse


Posted February 28, 2010

In this school the teacherss pick favorites and if any student isn't their favorite they smash them into the ground. I went to this school one month and hated it. This was the third school I had gone to in my entire life so I might not have much experience with recommending schools but this school givews way too much homework, your family is always going to be stressed out and your students always tired. I wouldn't want my worst enemy going here.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 24, 2010

My daughter and my son both attended this school after transfering from Sequoyah at semester last year. Immediately they were bullied. My daughters grades were usually always 4.0 but once she transfered to Sac. her gpa began to lower too much I am talking 2.8! My son remained a steady 3.56 but he as well alwaysed had 4.0. After 3 months of being there were transfered to Illahee. They love it there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2009

none yet, but interested in finding out more about this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

This school is superb. The friends you make here really last a life time. I attended this school for only one year (I wish I could have stayed longer), but that is the year that I made my closest friends. The atmosphere is really like a family, and you feel close to everyone. The teachers are great, too. I really learned a lot in this school. There are times that you can really hate your teachers for giving you so much homework or making you do things that seem dumb, but when you look back, you really appreciate them. I do. I've gained a really thorough knowledge of each subject. If you go here, you'll WANT to get up and go to school in the morning.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
97%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female91%
Male73%
Black50%
Asian94%
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income78%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female94%
Male83%
Black90%
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income91%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female95%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income69%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female89%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income63%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female94%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income75%
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students79%
Female83%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian84%
Asian/Pacific Islander84%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income76%
Not low income81%
Special educationn/a
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female91%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income84%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students88%
Female91%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income88%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

28 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
96%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
87%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
85%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
69%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
98%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students52%
Female58%
Male42%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White61%
Low income62%
Not low income45%
Special educationn/a
Not special education52%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students87%
Female88%
Male84%
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Multiracialn/a
White93%
Low income84%
Not low income88%
Not special education86%

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Malen/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students59%
Female80%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education63%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students77%
Female83%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low incomen/a
Not low income87%
Special educationn/a
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students86%
Female83%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Not low income85%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students94%
Female92%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income79%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

49 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

50 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
84%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 28% 7%
Hispanic 10% 20%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Black 4% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 12%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 226%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 23N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 77%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Honors track
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:30am
School end time
  • 3:00pm
School Leader's name
  • Kurt Lauer
Fax number
  • (253) 945-3399

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Vocational education
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

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34620 9th Av South
Federal Way, WA 98003
Website: Click here
Phone: (253) 945-3270

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