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GreatSchools Rating

Todd Beamer High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted December 28, 2013

I attended this school between 2006 and 2010. Most would agree that TBHS got off to a rocky start but in the time I was there I saw huge improvements. I was able to participate in excellently run extracurricular programs and was able to start my own club... though I must admit it would have been nice to see more opportunities for artistic programs to flourish. While I can't speak for the entire school, the teachers in the B&I Academy, now called the Blue Academy, were mostly pretty good. Some have argued that the academy system breaks up the school and plays favorites. The Math Science Health Fitness Academy was favored when I was there, getting their own special assemblies and allowing that academy's students to form closer relationships with the sports coaches because they were their teachers. Perhaps this has changed since the academy's name change... but looking back, I actually think it worked out for the best. Not that this was true of everyone in the MSHF academy but by and large the meaner, more superficial and clique-y students signed up for that academy. Meanwhile in B&I, everyone was nice and respectful to each other. I enjoyed my time there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 11, 2013

I've attended Beamer for 2 years, and am about to be a Junior. While I am not the best student, nor do I participate in sports, I've really had a good time at this school. It isn't the best, but better than most. There are /some/ snobby kids but overall the students are really nice and I made friends on my 1st day. I'm in SGLE (now called Silver Academy) and it has some of the best teachers in the district, in my opinion. The Jazz Choir at Beamer is 2nd best in-state and it's a lot of fun. The school isn't perfect, a little crowded, but I've had good memories here. Disciplinary action is lacking though, or done in bad ways. (A kid was expelled for being suspended too much, but a girl with a 4.0 got 1 lunch detention even though she assaulted someone and harassed them for weeks. On the whole the faculty is good, but some cases are outrageously lenient or severe.) I've recently had a lot of problems, and when my grades were slipping badly, all my teachers were insanely understanding and kind, and their kindness really floored me. I've been treated very well here, and I have people I can talk to at this school, and that's enough for me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 20, 2012

I think this is a good school with teachers that will work with the students. A school is what you make it and if as a parent you are involved it's a win win situation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

My advice to all who aren't interested in their child being a cheerleader is to transfer from this school immediately. Certainly if you are expecting your child to either have a successful college experience or to gain some vocational skills that would allow them to earn a living wage. University of Washington places the graduates of this school in the lowest category.


Posted October 6, 2009

I love Todd Beamer because of all our school spirit !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

it has the best group work everyone is soo nice and we need the money(:
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2008

I graduated from todd beamer in 2008 from the math science health and fitness academy. if some one asked me if beamer is a good school to go to i would say YES! i loved it. the teachers are so great, they care about the students and their futures. want proof? a friend of mine knew no one that went to college and had no clue about financial aid for it. a teacher, not just the career service lady. this teacher met with my friend and his mom and helped him through EVERYTHING. i was also a cheerleader at beamer and the coach is great. i have also met many of the other coaches and they are really nice. the sports teams arent that great but the students and the coaches do their best. the academies are alright but not bad. its a great school and i'd recommend it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 12, 2008

My children are the best evidence. My son, a 2008 graduate, had his choice of 7 merit scholarships. He attends the engineering school at the University of Portland and reports he is very well prepared for calculus, physics, philosophy and his other courses. My daughter, a 10th grader, splits her time between running on the Titan's winning cross country team and home work in her rigorous courses. She has a very strong relationship with her teachers and coaches, which contributes to her academic success. She took and passed the WASL as freshman.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2008

I have had such a positive experience so far. My daughter has special needs that were not being met in a nearby district at all. Beamer and its staff were challenged by our needs in that my daughter does not qualify for IEP classes. She is in regular classes with accommodations. Her teachers communicate with me without giving me the impression that it is too much to do so. She is getting more help with work than she ever did from the other district right next to them. As for the academies, I think they are great. Yes, they socially lump the kids together, but the kids do that anyway. It keeps the jocks from picking on the nerds so to speak. They still have problems, but what public school doesn't.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2008

I believe that Beamer is New and as new schools go, it has problems. When you attend Beamer, Don't expect to get the same kind of social treatment that you would expect at a traditinal High School. Beamer is broken down into four academys. Each academy has it's own identity, the problem is if you don't pick the academy that fits your personality, you have a problem, that is what I see. If you are not into sports, you would not enjoy being in the Math Science Health and Fitness Academy, not to say that you are not getting a good education. You Get that from each academy. What the differece between each is the social life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 12, 2008

I am a ex-student from Beamer and I agree its in a bad neiborhood like the other highschools but go to Federal Way High and say this one is not safe. It is over crowded compared to when I started there and some teachers are over rated but the B&I principl changed my life and is continuing to do so, both in and out of school even after my not going there he is still a friend of mine and many of the teachers do get involved with each student maybe even too involved, but they have our best interests at heart.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 6, 2007

the teachers are not involved in the students, as with the administration. the student discipline system is amazingly horrible. a couple of teachers are doing what they should be doing, but the rest have either given up on the students or just don't care about the students. just themselves. I think the academies are just incredibly stupid. if you are in one academy you cannot take a any-other classes in the other academies. all academies have different classes.. so if you seem that you may want to go in a couple directions.... you cannot; because the school doesn't allow it. I highly recommend studying the academies before you send yourself or your children into this school. also the main focus is on sports and not academics.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 31, 2007

Not such a great school, this school is way over-rated, and not safe at all. This website needs to rethink their 9 out of 10 rating, because they are wrong.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 28, 2007

This school is great because the teachers are so involved with the students. They're not just like heres the work and say go ahead and do it they care about the students. After school sports are improving drastically almost all our sports made it to state and one took third and this year the soccer team has a great chance in state.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 13, 2006

horrible school, bad disipline system, overcrowded, pathetic sports and academics, and worst of all, the academys: lets split the school up into 4 different schools and limit the classes kids can take, for example, if i was in the math science academy, i couldnt take creative writing or drama because they are part of humanities and arts and if i joined that academy i couldnt take marketing or buisness math becuase they are in buisness and industry
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 22, 2005

This school is a disaster for kids that are seeking to enter college or for kids that wish to find a vocation. Emphasis here seems to be on 'social interaction' not learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2005

The academys are a waste of time and should be eliminated.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 28, 2005

This school has the lowest SAT scores in the district along with the lowest participation rates. Parents that are expecting their kids to attend competitive colleges might wish to look elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2005

Todd Beamer is a nice school with new facilities that allow students to learn at the hightest level possible. Though it is somewhat trial and error because it is only in its second year, there is a large amount of promising evidence.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 2, 2005

I am currently a Junior at Todd Beamer, I have been there two years now and from my firsthand experience of this school is great. I like it because it is indoor and fairly big. The teachers are great, and the students are respectable. I have been to some after school activites and there wasn't alot of school spirit. I think that is because we are a new school and we don't have any traditions. I believe that in ten to twenty yeas from now, this school will even better. Its a great learning environment. I am the graduating class of 2006.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

192 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
30%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
81%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
77%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
15%

2011

 
 
16%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

382 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
39%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
36%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
23%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
37%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
13%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Female32%
Male27%
Black16%
Asian33%
Asian/Pacific Islander42%
Hispanic21%
Multiracial18%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Low income25%
Not low income37%
Special education11%
Not special education34%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students79%
Female80%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low incomen/a
Not low income81%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students76%
Female73%
Male79%
Black77%
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic71%
Multiracial62%
White81%
Low income66%
Not low income82%
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students15%
Female16%
Male14%
Black13%
Asian27%
Asian/Pacific Islander26%
Hispanic13%
Multiracial8%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White13%
Low income12%
Not low income20%
Special education7%
Not special education18%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students65%
Female66%
Male65%
Black53%
Asian76%
Asian/Pacific Islander71%
Hispanic55%
Multiracial59%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander53%
White73%
Low income51%
Not low income78%
Special education24%
Not special education69%
Limited English18%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students54%
Female55%
Male52%
Black46%
Asian70%
Asian/Pacific Islander65%
Hispanic55%
Multiracial64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Low income48%
Not low income59%
Special educationn/a
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students14%
Female16%
Male13%
Black0%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White6%
Low income14%
Not low income14%
Special education0%
Not special education23%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students38%
Female39%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education40%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students13%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income18%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education17%
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

419 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
50%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

473 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

462 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
43%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

469 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students85%
Female89%
Male81%
Black80%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanic78%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander69%
White90%
Low income76%
Not low income93%
Special education37%
Not special education91%
Limited English29%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female92%
Male83%
Black80%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander77%
White91%
Low income81%
Not low income93%
Special education45%
Not special education93%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 45% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 17% 7%
Black 13% 5%
Hispanic 13% 20%
Two or more races 8% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 15%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 248%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 22N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 8N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 67%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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35999 16th Av South
Federal Way, WA 98003
Phone: (253) 945-2570

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