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GreatSchools Rating

Decatur High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted October 28, 2013

Decatur High School....My daughter attends Decatur and has since her freshman year. My middle daughter is now a freshman there, and frankly I am completely satisfied with the academics, the positive experience that my children have received at the hands of their instructors and the environment all around. Every school has its issues, but decatur feels like home to us!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2013

Decatur High School offers a state of the art Automotive Technology program offering students training in 6 NATEF content areas, summer internship programs, competition in Ford/AAA and SkillsUSA events, as well as access to the latest in industry standard tools and equipment. Students can graduate with ASE Student Certificaton and Honda Express Service Certification.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 17, 2011

Perhaps if schools are to be rated on "Spirit" or athletics this might be an OK option. If "Education" in the traditional sense is what you are interested in.......
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2010

I am currently a senior here at Decatur High School. The majority of these critiques are older so maybe my perception of the school could help... Decatur is what you make of it. There is an assortment of activities that can occupy anyones' life. It is true that our athletics are not as strong but your son or daughter could make a difference. Our boys basketball team has been ranked in state every year that I have gone to DHS. We do support every sport and are especially proud of our spirt. Some teachers are a bit more abrasive than other s but if your student actually goes beyond what he/she are required to do such as go after school or go to study club then they should be fine. While most would say they have hated high school, I am proud to say that I have loved every single minute of it. Decatur has throughly prepared me for life after high school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 6, 2009

the theatre and arts program is amazing, come see a show there if you haven't XD
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 10, 2009

Decatur is a great school. It is dealing with a huge change in the population. School spirit, pride in academics and athletics are the core to the success of DHS. It has many (not all) teachers. I would rate it a 4.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2009

Aside from being like a prison Decatur is a fairly good school. If you pay attention in class and don't fall into peer pressure then you will succeed. The teachers there are fairly good if you ask them for help they will help you. Hanging out with some of them durring lunch like ms. Beaver is very fun. School is highly spirited great music program and state wide recognize basketball program. If you are into marketing DECA is right for you the instructor is very dedicated in helping you succeed. Final note your are either in DECA, Dance team, Cheer, Jock or honor student to have a great highschool life
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 18, 2008

Pre-AP or AP is a must if you want your child to develop academically and eventually go to college. As a freshman at UW, I would compare most AP classes to am entry level college course. The 'normal' classes at Decatur (with the possible exception of math) are a joke... I have had varying experiences with teachers...some of them have been very dedicated, some of them wouldn't care if a student was having a seizure on the floor in front of them.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 4, 2007

I pulled my son out of school after one semester. Socially, the kids seemd to be gang posers. The staff seemed unconcerend about this. Their sports programs were a joke (dont expect any athletic scholars our of this school), the teachers didn't seem to care as much whether kids were engaged or not, the counselors also had somewhat of the same non-chalant attitude with snapshot judgements based solely on their opinions. For example, they dont offer placement exams so they have no individualized learning plan for your child based on his aptitude or current learning level. They also have no remedial interventions to mitigate the ignorance of their wrong placement decisions. A waste of federal funds!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2005

Decatur has proven to be challenging in most of its courses although there are some discipline issues such as fights in lunchrooms and hallways. Despite that, the AP and pre-AP seems to a well-constructed program which provides some great couse content and challenging discussions. A lot of the extracurriculur programs sound interesting but working through the sign-up process is annoying, especially with sports programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2005

i currently go to decatur high school as a sophomore. its a fairly good school...there are plenty of nice kids. as far as academics go, there are some kids who arent very committed to their schoolwork, and others who work very hard. They have a great orchestra and choir program under Mr.Gorringe's leadership, and a state-championship winning swim team. Athletics are a big deal at decatur...and i think it is a very good school overall.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 30, 2005

The schools academic reviews are frighteningly below state and national average. I would not recommend this school to parents, I would consider other forms of education outside the district
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2005

Academics aside, the bathrooms are like the garbage dumps you see in 3rd world countries. I was there for a PTA meeting and needed to use the amenties and I almost vomited at the sight of an unsightly result of defication on the floor. Along with that, there was numerous wet toilet paper hanging all over the ceiling and walls. But, bathrooms aside, the teachers tend to beat students whenever they feel like it. No, not physicall beating, but mentally beating. My daughter came home one day saying that her teacher asked if she was stupid. This is an outrage. I immediately withdrew my daughter from the school and have filed a lawsuit.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted January 24, 2005

An upper class school with a good sports program. teachers seem a little out of touch with students, but a very safe and overall rewarding experience.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 10, 2004

I think that if you are in advanced classes the school is fine the students get treated great, But if you are not so great with school and are a struggling student, you dont cause any problems but your grades are an issue I think it is a rotten school the teachers seems to think that they can treat the students terribly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 1, 2003

This is a great school, and there are lots of opportunities for kids to get involved both in and out of school. The list of extra curricular activities is impressive. For the most part teachers at Decatur will do whatever they can to help their students succeed. As a recent grad of DHS I feel I was given more opportunities to do well and go to college than I ever could have imagined. Another good quality about Decatur is how the students come together to support each other athletically and academically, its truly amazing.


Posted November 19, 2003

I have had two children graduate from Decatur, and one who wll be there next year. When my 2002 grad. was at Decatur the biggest problems she had were that the sports programs got nearly all of the extra curricular funding, and the arts programs, including her specialty, drama, were severely shortchanged in the budget.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2003

This school definitely shows its age and does not have great amenities. The teaching staff is definitely compassionate.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
25%

2011

 
 
30%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
84%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
86%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

109 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
7%

2012

 
 
16%

2011

 
 
25%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

176 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
47%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
42%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
5%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
37%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
28%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
5%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female19%
Male20%
Black5%
Asian20%
Asian/Pacific Islander31%
Hispanic21%
Multiracial10%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White18%
Low income18%
Not low income22%
Special educationn/a
Not special education20%
Limited English18%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students82%
Female80%
Male84%
Black64%
Asian72%
Asian/Pacific Islander75%
Hispanic62%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income72%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students73%
Female69%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asian58%
Asian/Pacific Islander67%
Hispanic62%
Multiracialn/a
White83%
Low income70%
Not low income77%
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students7%
Female8%
Male6%
Black0%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander13%
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White12%
Low income8%
Not low income7%
Special education0%
Not special education10%
Limited English9%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students38%
Female37%
Male38%
Black25%
Asian27%
Asian/Pacific Islander27%
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Low income31%
Not low income46%
Special education19%
Not special education41%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students39%
Female36%
Male43%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander54%
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Low income34%
Not low income46%
Special educationn/a
Not special education40%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students5%
Female5%
Male6%
Black0%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic0%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White6%
Low income4%
Not low income7%
Special education0%
Not special education7%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students19%
Female8%
Male26%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White43%
Low income25%
Not low income15%
Special educationn/a
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students20%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

333 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
38%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

317 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

336 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
37%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

311 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students84%
Female87%
Male80%
Black75%
Asian84%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic78%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander60%
White92%
Low income79%
Not low income88%
Special education35%
Not special education90%
Limited English43%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students85%
Female91%
Male77%
Black77%
Asian84%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic80%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander70%
White90%
Low income81%
Not low income88%
Special education38%
Not special education90%
Limited English43%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 43% 60%
Hispanic 19% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 13% 7%
Black 13% 5%
Two or more races 7% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 15%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 247%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 62%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
Security personnel
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Industrial shop
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Tom Leacy

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • Security personnel
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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2800 SW 320th St
Federal Way, WA 98023
Phone: (253) 945-5200

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Internet Academy
Federal Way, WA





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