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GreatSchools Rating

Gig Harbor High School

Public | 9-12 | 1638 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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27 reviews of this school


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Posted July 14, 2013

I graduated from Gig Harbor High School this year and I am grateful for the experience. I transferred from a private high school after my first year for financial reasons, and I was worried that public school would terrible. I am happy to say that I actually liked attending GHHS better than my old school. I feel totally prepared for college. I took advantage of honors and AP classes (lots of options to choose from), and the teachers in these programs were excellent. They challenged us and taught us critical thinking skills. My AP scores allowed me to start college as a sophomore and I thank my dedicated teachers for that. I also found several activities to be involved in, like cross county and the debate team. Both of those programs are excellent, no-cut, and have terrific coaches. Like the person before me said, I was kind of intimidated at first because I'm kind of nerdy and shy and I was worried about cliques, but I found that there really is a place for everyone there...you just have to jump in with both feet, get involved, and keep a positive attitude and soon you'll feel right at home. I am thankful for the education I got here and I'm proud to be a Tide!
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 21, 2011

As a parent, The total lack of leadership is the most frustrating...there is no leadership..Parental input is not only discouraged /ignored it is penalized. Incident after incident is mishandled at every level..math program is still very weak..Sport teams are very political..the majority of kids that give the teams a try walk away feeling inadequate.....quality of programs..some good ..most well below what would be expected at this size of a school that has the tax base it has to draw from. Given the opportunity I would without hesitation send my child elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2011

I'm another former student of GHHS and I'm now a sophomore at the University of Washington. For the most part, I had a very positive experience at this school. However, I think that there should be some major changes in the curriculum to better prepare students for college. Watch out - the math program at this school sucks! I went all the way through caculus (the furthest you could go), but I can't apply what I learned to anything. From what I've heard, other GHHS students have struggled with this as well. They also do not give their students finals. Yes, this seems great when you're a high school student, but it's a rough awakening in college. The athletic programs are mostly fantastic (XC, Volleyball, Track, Soccer, Football), however, there are the occasional horrendous coaches that the district has refused to let go after multiple problems (Girls Bball) . The sports can be very political as well. Good school, but like any other it has its positives and negatives.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 4, 2009

I am a former student of GHHS and current WWU student, and I must say what made me what I am today is GHHS. With few exceptions, I was offered a wide-variety of course choices and I had good relationships with all but a few teachers. By far, GHHS' greatest asset is its staff: any attempt to seek assistance was always met with a great deal of help and it was obvious they wanted me to succeed. Three teachers in particular, above and beyond the regular scholarship notebook program, took time out of their schedules to help me achieve a full-tuition scholarship for two years: this staff is like family to the students.


Posted November 8, 2008

As a 3x mom of very different kids, here's my input: English - Very good, prepares well for college Science - Good - miss Mr. B tho Math - with the exception of one (Mr J) it's terrible; one great teacher can't possible prepare 1500+ students Choral Music Dept: simply the best, great director - probably the best thing about GHHS History - Good Extra Curricular: Athletics - strong programs, (Track & XC consistant championships - terrific coaches) but sometimes political; Theater & Arts - terrific plays, talented kids and director; diverse Clubs, pretty much something for everyone Staff - depends on the teacher; agree about the liberal slant (keeping personal views out the classroom is a problem); VPs - both helpful and committed to the kids; Principle - pretty much avoids controversy, but gets no support from the District Office either (what a joke there - overpaid, clueless and lazy) all three had good experience
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2008

Very disappointed in the staff and their lack of communication with parents. Unhappy with the way an important incident was 'mis'handled by faculty and staff. Would not send my child here if I had another choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2008

We are very impressed with GHHS, we have two students there, and although we are interested in purchasing a different home, we absolutely decided that GHHS was the school we had to be in for the years our children were still in school. This was both because of the School newspaper program, and because individual teachers worked with our children to help them realize their potential and their skills, particularly in the writing skills. In regards to the math, I know at another school (CA) there was a lot of students that had to repeatedly take the Grade 9 math & that was not considered an anomaly. We had a problem that required an interview with a Vice Principal and a teacher, I was totally blown away with how supportive the VP was with my teenager and how totally well he handled the whole situation. It was really excellent!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2008

I just graduated from this school. I have been to other schools and this one by far is the best. It has classes that many other schools don't have and allow the students to broaden their horizons to other opportunities to pursue in college.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 5, 2007

My daughter is going into her junior year and she has grown up so much in just 2 years. I give credit to her teachers especially who wouldn't let her be lazy. Now when she talks about college I am not so nervous!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2007

Like any school, what you put into it is what you get out of it. GHHS has been a good environment for my kids both academically, sports-wise, and for extracurriculars. There are opportunities at GHHS for kids to travel competitively for debate and for cultural exchanges with Germany and China. Overall, this is a safe school environment with caring staff and I think GHHS is doing a good job at educating our teenagers. That being said, there is always room for improvement. If I had to point a finger, it would be that the math department is weak, but that is also a fallout of the math curriculum the district has chosen to adopt. The kids have the convenient option of doing Running Start if this is a problem for your student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2007

I have had four children attend GHHS. It has been a constant struggle to get help from school officials. The math program is an absolute disaster. When my son began to have trouble in math I requested the teacher send weekly e-mails updating me on his progress. This lasted about three weeks and stopped. I had no idea he was flunking math until I saw his report card. My children have been harassed for their religious beliefs and their communication difficulties. When I complained about this the typical answer was 'kids will be kids'. The teaching environment is extremely liberal and my children have come to the point of simply not commenting in class over liberal remarks made by faculty members. My children have attended three different high schools in WA, I would rate the faculty by far the lowest. If I could afford a private school I would send them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2006

I attended Gig Harbor High School from 2000 to 2004. It is a fantastic school committed to education of both the mind and the heart. Many parents in Gig Harbor choose to send their kids to private school. This is a case where I do not deem that as necessary. I was especially surprised at the great Christian community that culminates inside the school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 1, 2006

There is a lot of parent involvement at this school. The teachers have a big impact on the students and are available outside of class many times. After school sports are also present as well as many clubs for students to join.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2006

Gig Harbor High School has not been a good environment for my child. A B-student in middle school, his grades have been steadily declining from the day he set foot in GHHS and I find it difficult to get support from the school. They seem only interested in punishment, not in helping the student make positive choices for improvement. I am researching other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 26, 2006

this school is an awesome school for any child. filled with different types of peoplea different programs its a good choice for your teen. they're also very focused on college and working hard to get your child where they want to go.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2006

GHHS is the best school imaginable, and has the best teachers, and the best classes!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 27, 2005

GHHS is, in many respects, a relatively good school. However, as in any school, there are some bad apples. Yes, test scores are somewhat higher than those of most public high schools, but the fact remains that it is still an under-funded government-run propaganda centre.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2005

Seemed like a very modern school, each room had computers, and tvs. The school has excellent social and academic programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2005

This school has great potential. The teachers are hit or miss as far as reaching the students. The students that do the best seem to be the ones whose parents are most involved. As a parent you need to stay tuned into the social environment due to a prevalence of wealthy families and 'spoiled' children - and the attitudes that go along with that. The extra curricular programs are terrific, and highly pushed by the administration. While a very clique school, there is a place for everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2005

I graduated from ghhs in 2002 and loved every moment of my time there. It is an excellent school with exceptional staff that truly care about their students. the community is very supportive, great sports teams and lots of volunteer activities. I loved every year of ghhs and made countless friends in my 4 years there. This school is HIGHLY recommended all everyone!
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

271 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
70%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
99%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
37%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

286 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

182 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
73%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
19%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
51%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students89%
Female87%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracial90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income72%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White99%
Low income100%
Not low income99%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Female33%
Male37%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Low income7%
Not low income48%
Special educationn/a
Not special education44%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students85%
Female88%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracial85%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income70%
Not low income88%
Special education55%
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students85%
Female80%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracial95%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income80%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students50%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students73%
Female70%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White70%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students55%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White55%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

382 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

418 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

384 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
65%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

412 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income83%
Not low income95%
Special education50%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female98%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income85%
Not low income96%
Special education82%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 60%
Two or more races 6% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Hispanic 3% 20%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 16%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 210%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 77%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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5101 Rosedale St NW
Gig Harbor, WA 98335
Website: Click here
Phone: (253) 530-1400

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