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GreatSchools Rating

Granger High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
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2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted March 11, 2011

Although i didnt not graduate from Granger high school, i did attend granger school district from kindergarten till freshmen year and i have to say some of the best times of my life were spent there. The teachers were ever so helpfull. i could always find help when i needed it. when ever my grades were lacking there was always a teacher to call me on it and it was very helpful. I personally would send my kids there.


Posted November 15, 2010

Granger High school has horrible issues. i was a student there my freshman year and i had teachers that did not know how to controll the class and the english teacher that i had would not work with me (she even flat out gave up on me right in front of my mom) and it is not a verry good environment for a student to try and lern in. i would recomend goig to zillah where there is actually controll of the classrooms and nicer people.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 22, 2008

Granger High school is not a good school. It does not have good academics .The discipline there is very poor and the many of the students have bad manners.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2008

I gradute from Granger High School. It is the best they have the best techers, they will help you in any subject, and stay after school if you need more help. They get you ready for college level. You have to see it!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 14, 2005

Granger High School Is the most wonderful school I have ever been in! I as a student haven't been more impressed!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 9, 2005

I graduated from Granger High in '04 and the quality of the academic programs are dramatically improving, while still lacking in advanced and AP classes. Availability of music and art are lacking, but are present. Sports are a big deal at GHS, especially football and basketball. Parent involvement is quite high as there is a 100% enforcement of parent/student- teacher conferences. Your parent doesn't come, you don't get a grade.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 14, 2005

I attend this school and what better principle can we have. How about the extra cirricular activities they are awsome. We are still on the look out for the best school to compete against us and I don't think it will be any time soon.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 22, 2004

I attended GHS beginning with kindergarten continuing through middle and high school until I graduated in 2000. Now that I am graduating from Washington State University I realize how much GHS had to offer. We had excellent faculty members and a 'tight-knit' family of classmates. Although GHS is rather small concerning student population, GHS allowed for efficient leadership growth due to being a small school. Everyone would often join together to assist in mastering projects concerning GHS as well as the Granger community. Teachers are extremely personable and genuinely sincere. They are confident and knowledgeable. I have talked to my college peers regarding their high school experiences. I constantly received the same responses, 'My school never did that,' I was able to say, 'Well mine did.' I can honestly and truthfully confess that GHS is one of the best schools in Washington. Contrary to popular belief, GHS is fabulous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2004

I am a former student from Granger High School. I have attended Granger schools all of my life. I think that Granger High School is a great school. The schools has many things to offer. We can get help from teachers all the time. They are always there for us. There is a study session in the morning from 6:20am to 7:30a.m., also the teachers are there after school unil about 5p.m. Our counselors are always there if you need help with a problem or just need to talk with someone about a personal issue. The staff at GHS is great. This 2003-2004 school year we were awarded the Model High School of the year. I believe GHS is a wonderful school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 12, 2004

I am currently a student at Granger High School. To me this is a great school to attend and gradute from. We dont have that much electives but its still a good school. When you go to Granger High School you go into a school where your teachers actually care about your future and they offer their help in order to achieve your education.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
6%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
31%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
32%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
7%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
9%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students49%
Female50%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income49%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education49%
Limited English20%
Migrant60%

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students17%
Female11%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic17%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income18%
Not low income10%
Special education9%
Not special education18%
Limited English30%
Migrant36%

Biology I

All Students43%
Female41%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Not low income62%
Special education43%
Not special education43%
Limited English23%
Migrant52%

Geometry

All Students51%
Female42%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low income36%
Special educationn/a
Not special education51%
Limited English39%
Migrant50%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students11%
Female13%
Male9%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic11%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income12%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education11%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students15%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income17%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education17%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

116 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
16%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
55%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

113 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
15%

2010

 
 
17%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students65%
Female79%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic66%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income64%
Not low income73%
Special education31%
Not special education70%
Limited English20%
Migrant59%

Writing

All Students80%
Female87%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income82%
Not low income69%
Special education53%
Not special education84%
Limited English47%
Migrant71%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 90% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 5% 2%
White 4% 60%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 7%
Black 0% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 121%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 292%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 14N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 53%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Paul Chartrand

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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315 East Mentzer Ave
Granger, WA 98932
Phone: (509) 854-1115

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