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GreatSchools Rating

Issaquah High School

Public | 9-12 | 1892 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted September 3, 2014

Issaquah high school is a great school with an excellent learning environment. It all depends on the student and parents support as to what your child gets out of any school. My son recently graduated top in his class, he did not play sports and was a serious student who stayed focused. He is attending an awsome college and he thouroly enjoyed his time at IHS. I have another child who currently attends Issaquah high who plays sports, is in advance classes and social balanced. He is thriving. Parents need to be involved in their child's academic lives. You can't expect to send your child to school and let everyone else do the work for you. I was sad to read the negative reviews from students complaining about socioeconomics/class difference and lack of diversity. Welcome to the real world. Consentrate on what you can control and take advantage of the opportunity to receive a great education at IHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2014

As a student who went here for 4 years, I can honestly say I was disappointed in my experience here. I knew many, many students who were so sick of the cruel and harsh environment created by the students so they transferred out or started doing the running start program. Most of the students at this school are competitive and judgmental and straight up bullies. If you or your family didn't fit the upper middle class, white, cookie cutter mold you were outcasted by your peers and even the teachers and the administration. Many students of color would get teased daily by white students and no one thought anything of it. It's really quite sad because students at this school are afraid to be who they are and I have seen unique individuals turn into mean and unoriginal people. The administration doesn't do much about the bullying problem either. The education one receives at this school is actually good at times yet the atmosphere makes it hard for a student to concentrate. I would recommend sending your kids elsewhere if you want them to turn into decent human beings.


Posted June 3, 2014

This school has been in the news countless times and not for good reasons. It seems to me that the students as well as parents at this school are extremely competitive and over the top. If you want your child to attend a school with a diverse, friendly and caring student body look else where. This school has a major bullying problem, even resulting in a few students committing suicide. There is too much pressure at this school and not about academics, about the social aspects. It's apparent to me and other parents only the privileged thrive at this school. The teachers are decent and the building is of course, beautiful. But a beautiful building does not make up for the cut throat environment. I made the choice to send my kids to private school and I do not regret it one bit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2013

I have grown up in the Issaquah School District all my life. Since I have attended Issaquah High School I must say that I am very disappointed. I find that many of my peers are not focused on academic achievements but more on the social and athletic aspects of this school. Many of them complain that the classes are too difficult when there is just no effort being put into their academic studies.I went into high school my freshman year thinking that I was somewhat intelligent. Meeting people from other schools proved me wrong. Issaquah High School has a very poor curriculum in contrast to many other school districts. Their social aspects destroyed my faith in Issaquah. There is bullying, and cliques and a sense of entitlement instilled in many people. I must say that I'm embarrassed to call Issaquah my school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 30, 2013

My School is Issaquah High School. I find the building to be beautiful but the experience ends there. Poor administration communication to families, very little teacher interaction with parents, teachers very slow to update on line homework and grades if at all. I have found the administration to be arrogant and not really asking for or interested in having parents involved in the school. I know others feel differently but in my first year of my son attending I have only had 1 e-mail from a teacher. I see and know parents that want to be involved but staff appears to not ask, require or engage with anyone. I will say that this is different from the sports as they require heavy parent involvement for sports just wish they could do the same for academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2012

IHS's new building adds to the overall learning experience you get when you attend. Of course there are amazing teachers and less likable ones, this occurs at any school, but the outstanding teachers outnumber them. I was a 9th grader this year and I couldn't have asked for a better year. Having moved from a different state, I was worried about making friends and fitting in. At IHS there is an incredible amount of smiling faces who all want to be your friend. The best ways to get connected are to get involved in sports, band, or clubs, which there is plethora of. Every class I took I learned more than I could have ever imagined as the curriculum was challenging, but interesting. The atmosphere was always lively and fun to be in. Sadly, I'm moving again and will have to leave behind the gorgeous college-like campus. Moving to Issaquah? Issaquah High School is the best place to be, don t even think of going to Skyline or Liberty. Trust me; Issaquah High will forever impact your life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 17, 2012

Its a really good school. I would think it was really hard, but i also have learning disabilities. the teachers help me out a lot, and the people are really nice. Issaquah is also very spirited!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 13, 2011

Everyone tends to focus on the great sports programs, the school teeming with spirit and the facilities. While these may make the school look nice or fun at first lets not forget something. I came from a rigorous private school and was not able to pay for it anymore, so i got moved to issaquah. Let's just say, people who have been saying the academic classes are rigorous or the AP programs are sufficient are wrong. I've been in public school all my life up until these two last years at private school, and even being at Eckstein middle school i had more work! It's sad to see schools like issaquah take sports precedent over academics, i see a giant lack in academic support. The school is big, and even in advanced courses i find myself not being challenged or able to approach my teachers. The kids and my friends at the school always tell me how I've come from a private school and I'm sheltered and stuff like that, when they have one of the highest population of white people at their school and the smallest population of other ethical backgrounds at their school than others. Im hispanic, offended and have a bit of scorn for this school. Go if your a star athlete, nothing more...
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 15, 2011

Excellent academics. kids always have homework. Teachers respond to e-mail and phone messages. great sports programs with top quality coaches. Teachers and staff are very good. Brand new rebuilt school buildings. Kids with Issaquah High Diplomas have no problem getting into Colleges.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2011

interesting school. many different groups of people, but because there is practically no diversity students form opinions of people. this causes a lot of racism/discrimination. Even some of the teachers are racist, I had to transfer out of a class because of a teacher like this. also the math department is terrible. great sports, and ASB program though I would not recommend this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 5, 2010

I graduated from Issaquah High in 2005. The English and Social Studies AP curriculum prepared me well to succeed in college. The AP instructors were very committed and attentive. The courses were rigorous. My only complaint is the lack of weighted grades; a student with an A- average in all AP courses is ranked lower than a student with an A average in non-AP courses.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 10, 2009

Issaquah High School has great Spirit and pride, our Sports are good, our classes are excellent and it is a super good environment to study in.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 22, 2008

Incredible teachers in advanced courses, great student body and school culture, and excellent opportunities to get involved. The facilities are being remodeled.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2007

poor facilities, fair academics, under-funded fine arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2006

The extracurricular activity program provide all students chances to join. Several levels in each sport team to accommodate all the students who are interested but not very skillful in the sports. It is good. The academic programs are good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2006

Wonderful education and location.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 3, 2005

Issaquah High School has been an excellent experience for my two sons. One graduated a couple of years ago with 25 AP credits; the youngest is a sophomore. Issaquah fosters respect for all their students; everyone (nearly) seems to feel valued, even if there talents are not 'traditional' high school activities. It is a healthy mix of suburban kids from a somewhat limited variety of backgrounds.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2004

Issaquah High School has to be one of the most spirited high school's. The seniors leave the school with memories that will live with them forever. The freshman are greeted and treated with respect by the upper classmen. There is a LINK program which allows incoming students to feel more accepted. Overall Issaquah High School should be your number one choice if you are moving to the Issaquah, Washington area.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
81%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

220 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
99%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
57%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

395 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
81%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

160 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
87%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
57%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students53%
Female45%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income18%
Not low income66%
Special educationn/a
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students93%
Female92%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income75%
Not low income95%
Special education71%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian98%
Asian/Pacific Islander98%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial100%
White99%
Low income90%
Not low income100%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students44%
Female33%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asian83%
Asian/Pacific Islander83%
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White37%
Low income22%
Not low income54%
Special education26%
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students90%
Female90%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander87%
Hispanic64%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income63%
Not low income93%
Special education81%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students93%
Female89%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income87%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students42%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education46%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

403 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

470 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

449 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
73%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

469 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students94%
Female93%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanic69%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income71%
Not low income97%
Special education68%
Not special education96%
Limited English40%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students97%
Female99%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian99%
Asian/Pacific Islander99%
Hispanic90%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income92%
Not low income98%
Special education93%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 69% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 19% 7%
Hispanic 6% 20%
Two or more races 4% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 18%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 28%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 22N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 60%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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700 2nd Ave SE
Issaquah, WA 98027
Phone: (425) 837-6000

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