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GreatSchools Rating

Kalama Jr Sr High School

Public | 6-12 | 580 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted July 25, 2012

Kalama Schools offer a great environment for students. Not only are sports programs well-supported, but so are the drama and music programs. FBLA competes at state level, and advanced classes are there for those who have the motivation to take the challenge. Teachers are attentive and always strive to help students succeed. As a student from elementary to high school I always felt supported by teachers, staff, coaches and my peers - these are people who I still hold relationships with many years after graduation. The student body is very much like family due to the small size. Kalama's leadership program is outstanding and gives students the opportunity to thrive as community leaders before they even leave campus. Bullying is a shame, but it occurs at any school and I don't believe for one minute that it's any worse here. I enjoyed my years at Kalama Schools and can't wait to raise my own children through this great school system!


Posted April 23, 2010

i am not happy with this school at all. i would not recomend this school at all. if i could rate it zero stars or negative stars i would
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

The teachers and coaches and staff not only give our kids the best education, they teach them compassion.....Go Chinooks!!!!!!


Posted October 26, 2008

Sports is the only game in town here. After years of no disipline we are sending our daughter to Kelso, at no small cost. Sports are important, but perspective is in need of focus here. The inmates are running this assylum.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2008

I am new to Kalama this year, and so far it has been so awesome!! But there is quite a bit of drama and rumor spreading. The teachers here are awsome! They will take time out of planning periods to help a student and they take time out of class to help one particular student. All of the teachers theory is that student success is #1. As for paying to much for sports? We did get a new turf and baseball field. But what about a new softball field? Everyone in sports are getting new things. We have had the same softball field for many years now and I think it is time to upgrade, as does the coaches. But overall this is a great school except for minor details. :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 17, 2008

I have been going to this school for 11 years now, and I wouldn't move. The teachers are great. The main flaw is they spend too much money on sports, but now we have turf. So that's good for football players. Their are about 5 fights a year. Go to a big school, you'll see that in a day.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2007

I have been attending this school system for thirteen years now. And honestly, the only grades that I did not experience any form of bullying were K-5. So only let your kids go here for their elementary years, the best. There is so much theft, vulgarity, and bullying here in the middle/high school that it blows my mind. The school administration favors sports, so that's where all the money goes, 'forget arts and new books! As long as there's sports equipment then everything is okay.' Also, the admin. has to have some kind of drama all the time... if there isn't any then they'll create it. Like picking on awesome teachers who have only been teaching here for three years, and who has the respect of the students that they(admin.) themselves lack! So if you are looking for an unfair administration to place your kid(s) under then this place is perfect!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 26, 2007

This school is an excellent learning enviroment if the will to learn is there. You couldn't ask for better teachers. I have attended many schools and I have never felt I have learned as much from any other staff. I regret the lack of a wide range of electives. However we do well for a low budget school. As for not preparing us for real life, Im sorry but you must be sadly misinformed. This school is one of the only small schools to be apart of the Washington Association of Student Councils. Our leadership programs let us work on improving our school. We will soon install an RSVP program. Which will improve our school enviroment. Sports programs are important to childrens futures because they can learn many life lessons that way.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 3, 2007

Not impressed with the constant bullying, attacking, and destroying of personal property that go's on in the middle school. My child constantly is getting something broken, stolen, taken, you name it and if my child stands up, my child gets detention or ISS. The principal seems to care however the asst. could not be farther away.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2006

I moved here in 2001. My two children attended Kalama Elementary with great success. My oldest is now attending the junior/senior high school. She was an honor roll student, but her grades declined tremendously because of the constant harassment in the classroom and on the campus by the
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2006

This school has a tremendous amount of bullying. It's a shame to see such a nice town go to waste.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2005

This school and administration have made a drastic decline in recent years. It is unfortunate that the children's education no longer seems to come first. I have two sons who have attended Kalama school since 1999. I recently pulled them out, along with numerous other parents who have done the same. They will not return unless the faculty makes some drastic changes. Five years ago I would have recommended this school to any parent. Now I won't even let my children attend. Kalama is a great place to live and it is unfortunate that the administration has chosen this path.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2004

This school has definitely gone downhill in recent years. There is a tremendous lack of discipline in the classroom, and I don't feel that it's a very safe environment anymore. Sports are very important...unfortunately academics don't seem to be as important. The facilities are old, much of the curriculum is old...however, there is up-to-date sports equipment!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2004

This school is in poor condition, needs better leadership and less money spent on sports and more on education. It is very backwoods in its way of thinking. Your children will not be ready for the real world if left here all of their lives. They can't keep a principal. The grounds are in poor shape as well as he buildings,but they have a new football stadium.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2004

I am a student at this school and i think the school is to focused on sports but the teaching staff is mostly great. the discipline is fine but the safety is low. our school is going downhill but not as much as these other people are saying the teachers are good at teaching. the dropping of driver's ed. is because you can take it out of school now, you may have to pay but it is still available. parent involvement is good to average school percentage.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 27, 2004

This school has provided me with the education I need to be a succesful person in the real world! The staff here is wonderful. The administration has guided me in the right direction and I am very greatful for not only Kalama Junior Senior High School, but the whole community in all! I love the people and the awesome enviorment. This is the Caddilac of schools...the prime example of great leadership and friendly outgoing people! I just really enjoy it here and believe that Kalama is the best school in the entire state of Washington for all!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 26, 2004

My two boys have attended since kindergarten. The elementary years were great. When my oldest started 6th grade, the violence and harrassment within the middle school students was unbelievable. The kids were left on their own at lunch to wander around the school between buildings. They were told to stay out of the classrooms, out of the high school hallways and no room in the cafeteria. My son was left to eat on the outside stairways. His food was grabbed and thrown in the garbage. There was no sign of a teacher or staff supervising these kids. By the 7th grade I pulled him out and put him in a private school. He went from flunking (The principle said they can fail and go forward until the 9th grade, then they are kicked out) to a A-B student. The school only focuses on sports.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2004

I believe the school has gotten worse over recent years. I believe the teachers and staff spend more time being the students buddies than being real teachers. The students have lost respect for the teachers and coaches. The school is a mess. It's dirty, lockers are falling apart. Some of the signs on the walls are disrespectful. I just don't understand how it has gone so down hill.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 3, 2004

This school is a good school, but it dramatically gets worse. The harrassment and discipline got worse. Some of what I think are the most important classes were cut recently like; cooking class, drafting,etc.The school has a habit to focus on sports and extracurricular activities more such as football.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 15, 2003

This used to be a good school to go to. But it gets worse every year. As usual it's whose parents has the most money and sports, sports, sports. Sports is not going to prepare our children in the world. Classes that we used to have that taught our children what they needed to prepare for the outside world have been taken out such as home economics, drivers ed etc. We need to get back to the basics and leave the sports out. If anything we should take out P.E. and extra curricular sports and put back in the classes that will help them!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
73%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
39%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
66%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
44%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students48%
Female47%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Low income48%
Not low income49%
Special educationn/a
Not special education52%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female63%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Low income60%
Not low income54%
Special educationn/a
Not special education57%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students59%
Female76%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income39%
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female73%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income54%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students79%
Female89%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income72%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students42%
Female40%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income37%
Not low income45%
Special educationn/a
Not special education46%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female70%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income67%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students75%
Female73%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income74%
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
78%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
63%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
47%
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
52%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
44%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students93%
Female94%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Female20%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low income33%
Not low income39%
Special educationn/a
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students97%
Female92%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White97%
Low income92%
Not low income100%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students71%
Female66%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income59%
Not low income80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students80%
Female78%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income73%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students50%
Femalen/a
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White50%
Low income36%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

86 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
34%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

93 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income74%
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female91%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income84%
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 60%
Hispanic 6% 20%
Two or more races 4% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 237%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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548 China Garden Rd
Kalama, WA 98625
Phone: (360) 673-5212

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