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GreatSchools Rating

Kelso High School

Public | 9-12 | 1652 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted March 17, 2011

The Special Education staff at Kelso H.S are amazing! Your truly angels in my eyes!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2010

My daughter is a freshman this year, and during 3 of the home football games my hubby, 2 other children and I have to sit where the high school students sit because my daughter has seizures, and we need to be close to the stairs...When we very nicely asked a few high school kids to sit down so my 6 yr old could see, we got swore at and told to shut the * up...When we told security the response was "that's the way the kids have always done it, if you don't like it stay home"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2010

Kelso High School has a pretty good anti-harassment policy, an excellent sports department, and a wonderful staff. The drama department is amazing; they've produced actors like Conner Trinneer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 3, 2010

I graduated Kelso High Class of 2010, and I would say Kelso is okay. I didn't take part in sports, but I was in a few clubs before the funding was removed. I took AP and advanced classes, and truly it is the only way to go. The building is newly remodelled, with many a flaw. There are ceiling leaks, the parking lot floods, there were some issues with ventilation, it was always cold, windows can't be opened (if the classroom even has a window) and there aren't student lockers. The teachers can be good or bad. Because I spent most of my time in advanced classes, I had the more effective teachers and the more effective classes. The leadership is okay, though "popular" students are favoured over others. And it is blatantly obvious. Overall, I felt safe, and the staff was usually kind. It's not a bad school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 22, 2009

* (CONTINUTED FROM BELOW) * - Safety is never a concern for me. I feel INCREDIBLY safe at school. I honestly do. - Extracurricular activities are funded very well I think. I don't play a single sport, but I see Kelso High accommodating for small, less popular teams or groups. This year there is color guard and there is a big involvement with that. - And special education to me, looks outstanding. There are a lot of Teacher's Assistants working with kids and special education teachers working with the special needs. Students are never impolite to them. In fact one student from the special education program sits with the other students at lunch every other day. In conclusion, teachers teach well, counselors are top notch, and it is an overall nice, safe and accommodating school. I recommend.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 8, 2008

I graduated a few years ago from Kelso. It had a pretty good sports program and a lot of funding for popular sports. Less popular sports got very little attention. As far as academics go, it wasn't the best school. The science program was pretty awful. I was actually given elementary school level 'zoo books' to read in advanced biology. Some of that is just laziness on the part of teachers. There is a fair mixture of good/okay/awful teachers at Kelso, though. As a student, I was very interested in AP programs, but, unfortunately, I only had a very few to choose from. Parents can get involved if they want. I knew some very involved--sometimes militantly over-involved--parents. The majority of parents don't get involved, though. The area has a lot of economic and social problems, so parent involvement is low. There's a lot of apathy.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 6, 2006

Kelso High seems to have great academic programs available for the students. Parents that would like to become involved at the school don't seem to have many opportunities to do so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2006

First off kelso high is a great school. Yes it can be clicky but that should give students more incentive tto be a little outgoing, if they want to be accepted. The disipline staff does thier job great, but sometimes makes a little too many mistakes. The acedemics and leadership is wonderful. They have awesome clubs like DECA, ASB and many sports to join, coming from a tough school in california i would recomend this school to anyone who has a little bit of personality.-a student
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 24, 2005

Active Principle. Poor funding for academics but the football team is well funded. minimal parent involvement. Lots of clubs to join, but a very 'clicky' school
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 3, 2005

I was very disappointed with the safety factor. There was very little leadership. My daughter did not feel safe in this environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2005

The school has made many improvements over the years. I do find it difficult at times to get feedback from teachers without counselor involvement. They have a fair mix of teachers, some wonderful, some so-so. Their counseling staff are definately worth talking to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2005

This school has ok teachers. But the discipline taken to the trouble kids needs work,I would rate this school a 2 out of 10
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

213 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
16%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

236 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
60%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

184 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
59%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
31%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
12%

2011

 
 
41%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students51%
Female49%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracial64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Low income44%
Not low income61%
Special education60%
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income95%
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students18%
Female18%
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic13%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Low income16%
Not low income23%
Special education6%
Not special education24%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students66%
Female64%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracial87%
Native American82%
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income62%
Not low income71%
Special education42%
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students71%
Female72%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracial76%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income67%
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education71%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students31%
Female24%
Male38%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Low income36%
Not low income24%
Special educationn/a
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students42%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education42%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

333 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
31%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

340 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

365 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
39%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

339 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic87%
Native American85%
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income92%
Special education46%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students85%
Female92%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Native American85%
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income77%
Not low income93%
Special education59%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 78% 63%
Hispanic 10% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 5% 2%
Two or more races 4% 5%
Asian 2% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 142%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 21%N/A8%
Special education 211%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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1904 Allen St
Kelso, WA 98626
Phone: (360) 501-1801

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