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GreatSchools Rating

Kamiakin High School

Public | 9-12 | 1570 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted February 26, 2014

My daughter and son-in-law both graduated from kamiakin HS. Two of my grandchildren recently graduated from KHS. We were originally from Richland so I had my doubts. 27 yrs later I am impressed with this school. Academics is their first priority, though they have excellent sports program, it is a must to maintain a passing GPA to participate. The music program is great. There are programs for everyone and parents are really involved. They prepare their students for graduation, workforce, & college. The principal and teachers closely monitor the success of each student. The math/science programs are excellent. The students are respectful. The dress code is excellent compared to other high schools in this area. All schools have problems with drugs and bullying. Kamiakin has fewer incidents. The only problem I have is the school sits in an undesirable neighborhood. I give this school 8 out of 10.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2014

You are going to find good and bad in every school. Kamaikin is no different. On the positive side there are some very good and caring teachers, academics - pretty strong. Negative side, possibly because of the schools location there are some dangerous elements and temptations present. I feel that there is a blind eye turned towards many of these issues with too little effort to rid the school of these problems. As always be involved with your kids and watch who they hang around. If I had to do it all over again would I have sent my kids here? I am sorry but probably not.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Great school! Excellent programs and caring teachers. The sports could be a little less political in cutting players especially in basketball!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Teachers are great! Love the variety of programs. Sports is good just tough to get playing time for all my efforts. I feel safe at school. Great music program.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 8, 2010

Kamiakin is an excellent high school. Definitely the best high school in the Tri-Cities. The kids do not get lost in the shuffle.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2009

It has been an amazing school that cares about academics and students personally1
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2008

The kids are very accepting and the academics are great. The teachers are personable and really care about the students' education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2008

My child loves his school. The academics there are great. Great sports program, Great Principle, but I think they need a complete overhaul of there math dept. kids are getting pushed through without learning. Do not get the helped needed so they can pass the class. I think with Wasl it has taken away from learning real math. But otherwise I think it is the best High School in the Kennewick district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2007

I have had four students go through this school and it is the best in the area by far- much more rigorous than other high schools. Discipline is excellent, students do not bully or treat one another badly- adults are on top of it. Wonderful experience for all four children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2006

I have a senior this year and we've all enjoyed his high school experience. KaHS teachers and staff have done a wonderful job in helping to prepare our students for their futures as adults. Please support KaHS and help them continue providing excellence to our students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2004

Great school with good sports and coaches. Not to mention intelligent students!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 13, 2003

Good school for motivated students. Some very excellent teachers. Sports are limited for boys unless you are into football. Average Joe may struggle for a good education because of lack of consequences for failure to follow rules. Some classes are hard to concentrate through the spit wads and talking of students. Gifted students are in paradise!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2003

The school has a history of having spirit ,but people need to remember that these students are the future and need to be treated like young adults not little kids.The school also has one of the better G.P.A.'s in the area .Keep up the good work and let's help the students continue their journey into the real world .
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

250 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

346 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
79%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
33%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
63%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

224 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
67%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
60%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students62%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special education50%
Not special education62%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrant33%

Biology I

All Students73%
Female70%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income55%
Not low income81%
Special education42%
Not special education75%
Limited English21%
Migrant42%

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education60%
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students27%
Female35%
Male21%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic13%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low income25%
Not low income29%
Special education19%
Not special education31%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students35%
Female35%
Male34%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic13%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income23%
Not low income47%
Special education41%
Not special education32%
Limited English15%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students87%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income82%
Not low income89%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students15%
Female13%
Male20%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Low income0%
Not low income25%
Special educationn/a
Not special education15%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students58%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education55%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

403 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

399 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

364 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
45%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students90%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic66%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income76%
Not low income94%
Special education43%
Not special education94%
Limited English38%
Migrant50%

Writing

All Students82%
Female92%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian75%
Asian/Pacific Islander75%
Hispanic72%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income69%
Not low income87%
Special education41%
Not special education86%
Limited English29%
Migrant54%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 76% 60%
Hispanic 17% 20%
Black 3% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 13%N/A8%
Special education 11%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 229%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 15N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 61%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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600 North Arthur St
Kennewick, WA 99336
Website: Click here
Phone: (509) 222-6478

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