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GreatSchools Rating

International Community School

Public | 7-12 | 380 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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32 reviews of this school


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Posted February 16, 2014

Before you decide to put your children in ICS open your eyes and listen carefully to what the school openly admits. 6-7 hours a night of homework, it is stated clearly on the reader boards in the school! One parent said it is education by brutality. The kids are slammed with busy work and stressed constantly to get it all done. There is a high incidence of anxiety and depression among the students to which the school states is normal. Think carefully before you put your child here, just because you win the lottery doesn't mean you really won!


Posted November 18, 2013

My child attended this school last year. My child isn't attending this year and we are so grateful to have our lives back and our students life back. Be careful if you think you are "winning the lottery ticket." Are you really? Does your child have any struggles at all currently because they will be amplified greatly. My child struggled from anxiety and depression during his second semester at ICS. My child was so slammed with busy work from school that there wasn't any free time to do outside activities. We even postponed vacations so he could do homework. Some of the teachers were understanding about my child's new issue of anxiety and depression in addition to other issues we had already dealt with but most were not! A word about homework from my informal polls was that most did about 6 hour of homework per night. I only heard of one child of all the people I talked to that required only 2 1/2 hours. Is it worth it? Check out their attrition rates! Talk to other parents not just one or two, poll a lot.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2013

I'm a student at this school and have very ambivalent feelings about it. This school drives students hard. Students will be prepared for college. My biggest complaint is that the school does not look after student's mental health. The faculty sees students struggling with depression and anxiety and tells them that it's part of the experience. This is absolutely unacceptable. Secondly I very much believe in the power of hard work, but this school takes it too far. It is VERY important to distinguish between work that helps students learn and grow and work that is given for the sake of giving work and of living up to a reputation. Pointless busy work has no place at an excellent school. Lastly, a third of the teachers are OUTSTANDING but there are a few completely inept teachers that weigh the school down. I dealt with an incompetent and frankly unstable new teacher this year and knew I would be ridiculed if I complained. Overall, you will get an incredible education at this school but think hard about whether or not it's worth the toll on your mental health and if you're willing to deal with some crazy stuff and be told that it's the price you made the choice to pay.


Posted June 23, 2013

Outstanding leadership A school that fosters organisation and academics. Amazing art program! Parent envolvenent is expected 30h/Year Tons of field trips. Even if your student is not considered "the smartast kid on the block" don't get discourage he or she will manage. 7th grade is tough on the parents since the school really teaches the kid to take responsibility for his or her work. For some parents it is hard to let go of controle. The Principal's line "you don't change us, we change you" is true. The math is truly advanced! The initial teast for it is there for a reason. Take your chance - we're hoping our next child will "win" the lottery ticket too...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2012

I am currently a 9th grader at ICS & I love it here. I agree with the comments about our principle, & how she isn't very thoughtfull towards the parents and students, but we now have a new principle. He is very caring towards the students and parents. I am very saticfied with him, & he really does strive to help others in this tight-knit community, yet he puts humor into it. Compared to the past principle, he is just absolutley easy to talk to, & isn't intimidating at all. As for the acedemics, the 7th & 8th grade could be quite challenging, but as a freshmen, everything just becomes so much easier. The cirriculums are great & they really are more advanced than regular highschools. Outside of school activities such as ASB, Mock Trial, etc. don't really have all the money they need, but we are still doing amazing things with what we already have. P.E. credits are hard to achieve at this school, especially because we don't have gym class or any sports teams (aside from frisbee & one month a year of soccer). Thankfully, our school's P.E. credit system is easy to use. To sum things up, ICS is really great and it has helped me become the person I am, today. Thank you for your time :)


Posted August 4, 2012

I am an ICS alum, and this school is wonderful. I agree that this school attracts the brightest and hardworking, but the teachers and curriculum play a huge role in the quality of the school. I am an average student, but by having teachers who actually knew my name and really cared for me made all the difference. There were times when the courseload was overwhelming; I was intimidated at points in time. But, because I was constantly pushed to do my best, I have grown into a person who is more wholesome and better than before. The curriculum is very demading and forces you to integrate reasoning and information from other classes, something that isn't always seen. The education and support of teachers help to create a world aware and well rounded individual. All classes are honors by ninth grade, and AP course are available in the last two years. College is less daunting because of the quality of education I recieved. Students are kind, involved, and are always passionate. The principal is very caring and conscientious. I could not have asked for a better place to spend six years of my life.


Posted August 12, 2011

The reputation of this school is very overrated. It rates hight because it attracts successful, hard working students with involved parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2011

Here's a model for what is right about education. We need to clone this model and offer in all school districts as well as expand the offering within our own district. Motivated teachers, great leadership, challenging curriculum and a small school community are just a few key factors to its success.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2011

An outstanding program. Admission by lottery; all types attend, from top to bottom achievers, but not recommended for "special needs" as they don't have the resources of larger schools & curriculum is tough. Many kids do well here that might be "lost" elsewhere without ICS's directed program & standards. Downside is fewer electives. Nearly all of staff are outstanding & very dedicated. Their enthusiasm encourages kids to excel. High expectations, & discipline is fairly strict. Great Principal but, due to budgets, has charge of 3 schools & no assistant which limits time spent with parents. Parents are expected to take an interest & do some volunteering which helps the school succeed with limited resources. Required language & "the Arts" for all is focused on developing the brain & cultural understanding through these skills rather than becoming an artist or linguist. Facilities are focused on academics (no PE). Kids can do sports at other schools & ICS sports clubs. If your student really needs an enforced PE regimen, ICS is not for you. Camp, mentoring + focus weeks integrate grades 7-12 well. My 2 ICS grads were well prepared & ahead of many college freshmen.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2010

Overrated, especially as far as the curriculum and quality of the teachers are concerned. The recognition it has received is due more to the quality of its student base and dedication of the students rather than the program, facilities or school itself. Probably 99% of the students would succeed if you put them in a forest with a collection of books. The school is not concerned with educating the WHOLE student, and the lack of any type of organized physical education department is merely a symptom of that fact. Of course they don't need teams or organized sports but encouraging SOME movement (other than self reported exercise regiments outside of school) would be ideal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2010

The academic level for most of the classes is perfect for college bound students. One third of the teachers are fantastic but the rest are medicore. The prinicpal only provides one way communitaction with parents and does not answer emails nor explain her rationale for decisions. She tends to be reactive (suspends kids for minor infractions) without talking to parents (just yanks the kid out of class in front of others, sends them home, and sends an email to the parents without any rational or opportunity to discuss except for the formal process of challenging the decision after the fact). Since she holds the power over teacher selection and over who gets what focs week activity, parents and students are afraid of challenging her. With Art being required 5 years, there are few electives, espeically AP classes. College prep counseling is minimal. Parents are treated as unpaid staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2010

I am a 11th grader at ICS and have been at ICS since 7th grade. It is an excellent school with wonderful teachers, but the principal lacks respect for students. She does not get involved with them often and otherwise only minds what she needs. Also, there are few extracurricular activities to enjoy.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 5, 2010

I attended ICS for all 6 of my high school years. It's still too early to determine if it was 'worth it,' but what I can say is that the teachers are excellent. They are the main reason why I stayed. They are experts in their subject, have a passion for teaching and are really engaged with each student individually. However, I agree with one of the comments below me in regards to the principal. She has no respect for the students, is extremely passive aggressive and seems to only care about gaining power. Also, the guidance counselor proves to be terribly incompetent year after year when 'helping' the seniors with college applications.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 20, 2009

This school is one of best schools I have ever known. I still go there and plan to go there for the rest of my high school years. It pushes you to be the best in yourself. Also, in this school, you find yourself excepted by anyone and everyone. It does not matter who you are, you are loved. Even though grades are hard to except, you become use to the homework load, the teachers will also do whatever is needed to for a person to succeed.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 21, 2009

I attended this school for three and a half years before it finally occurred to me how much I hated it there. ICS, as one reviewer has already commented, is perfect for only one type of student: analytical math and science types. If your child has any outside intrests, prepare to see them slowly fade into the abyss as the crush of excessive homework, pushed deadlines and badly written exams takes its toll. And since the faculty never promises to nurture the child's emotional development, this can lead to a grossly unbalanced student: overly academic and socially unadjusted. Many a student has left ICS's 'hallowed halls' completely unprepared for the non-academic portion of the college experience, and that, in my opinion, is completely unacceptable.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 25, 2009

I attended this school for six years and while I made many good friends there, I would not recommend it to prospective students or their parents. Parents should be warned that 'involvement' may mean doing grunt work rather than having a voice in how the school is run. The principal's lack of respect for students and parents alike is apparent in her attitude and actions towards them. I cannot emphasize this problem enough. There are some excellent teachers at ICS, many of whom still keep in touch with former students. That is probably the best part of the school. However there are also just as many mediocre teachers there. Finally, prospective college students beware: This school suffers from grade deflation. For every student here who heads for the Ivy Leagues, many, many more only make it to third and fourth-tier institutions.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 3, 2009

This school has really given me a sense of community. It's a lot different from the average high school where it's crowded and cliquey because at ics, everyone's a great big family, not to mention everybody knows each other and bonds for six entire years, which is something you can't really get outside of ics. You're friends become so close it'd be impossible to not remember them later on in life. I absolutely love this school and believe the new seventh graders applying would really like this new community as well.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 28, 2009

this school is awsome the people are great the teachers are awsome but some teachers are a little too tuff and there should be more homework
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 15, 2009

Great School! My kids have gone here for the past 6 years and I have found that I basically no longer need to worry about them. They will do their homework, i don't have to worry about the kinds of kids they will hang out with, etc. Many of the teachers are great and highly qualified, and looking at the number of national merit and the number of good schools these kids get into is alone staggering.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2008

My son is currently a senior at ICS. We have been verty pleased. While this isn't a school for everyone it has been just the right fit for our son. He is involved with drama and student government. He has had excellent teachers, with only a few bumps in the road over the 6 years. As a 6th grader I would never have put him in art, yet he found he loved it. He is also involved in after school music programs, which could be better supported by the adminstration, but was overall a great extracurricular. His overall education has been far above that of my older son who attended a regular high school in the district. The small school environment where all the teachers know the students adds to the students' ability to get help when needed and feel a part of the community. Good kids, good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
88%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students96%
Female96%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students96%
Female96%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian97%
Asian/Pacific Islander97%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students96%
Female98%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students91%
Female86%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female93%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Not low income92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
91%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students97%
Female94%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income97%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special education100%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students94%
Female89%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

71 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

67 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
96%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 60% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 32% 7%
Two or more races 4% 6%
Hispanic 3% 20%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 12%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 22%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 63%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Music
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Cindy Duenas

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball
  • Wrestling

Arts & music

Music
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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11133 NE 65th St
Kirkland, WA 98033
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 936-2380

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