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GreatSchools Rating

River Ridge High School

Public | 9-12 | 1157 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted April 19, 2014

My son attends River Ridge High School and is having the best high school experience we could have hoped for. We are a military family, but lucky enough to be able to remain on one spot for all 4 years of his high school. He loves the diversity, the teachers, staff and coaches. We are realistic in the knowledge that kids make poor choices at times, but the options and ability for our son to rise to his potential and even exceed it made us choose RRHS vs others in the area. It's smaller, but has all the same accelerated classes as the other schools. The kids joke about how RR gets a bad wrap due to its location. But most of the students embrace the reputation and use it to prove the neigh sayers wrong. We are very please with the education our son is receiving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2012

i have to children that attend this high school, they have been here for under a year n i have noticed that this school is bias against teen parents. they allow fighting and theats between kids but yet when you hear and witness thier staff verbally abuse students and you report it they do nothin about it and then go after your children with a vengance this is the worst high school in the lacey area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 1, 2011

i love going to this school. you can make so many friends. our sports programs are pretty good. there are many things i like about this school , but then again there are many things i dont like. i dont understand why this school is an outdoor school. i mean comeon this is washington , not hawaii. some of the teachers are rude and many teachers shouldnt even have a licenses to teach. this school doesnt have alot of money. i am a sophmore c/o 2013.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 26, 2010

I am a current student at RRHS and I am very disappointed. The ground is filthy and some of the faculty aren't very helpful. Some teachers are very rude and don't do their job. There are too many fights and students doing things they're not suppose to. I wish they would rebuild the school, even though it's only about 17 years old. And there's too much gossip and drama.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 14, 2009

im a sophomore this year at river ridge and i actually enjoy it! there are many people with different backrounds and colorful personalities and its way easy to make friends here! i look forward for the next 2 years at this school! --2011 baby(:
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 26, 2009

I graduated RRHS in 2003, and while I think high school was one of the most challenging times of my life, I enjoyed my time there. In spite of its 'gangster/ghetto' reputation at the time, it was a very tolerant place to learn and grow. I had a number of incredible teachers who played a large part in shaping my future. (I also had a few duds who were not invested in their students whatsoever.) The biggest drawback at RRHS was the horrendous scheduling system. There was no way to get into a routine because the schedule was changed not just yearly (we didn't have the same start time two years in a row) but monthly. It seemed like every other week we had at least one day of strange scheduling because of a holiday or break. Try being on time to class in that environment.


Posted November 19, 2008

This school is subpar with few competent teachers. Financial issues also hinder the school in ways such as making the day start at 7:20, which is bad for the students. Students often spit on the ground and so the ground is filthy, though inside the buildings is better.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 17, 2007

I attend river ridge high school and I love it. The academics programs are wonderful. The coaches and teachers are very Supporting and helpful with the students. The dance ,basketball, and track team is familial. In my opinion ,the best thing about the school is its diversity of students and teachers. It s full of different ethnical backgrounds. River Ridge offers a Varity of language programs. Currently I am taking Japanese. My parents are highly involved in my schooling. They have all of my teachers e-mails so they updates often. I would defiantly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 17, 2005

This school is the tops of the rest to me, my teenagers enjoy the school and the teachers. They have decided that R.R. is the place to be for a high school and are glad to be students there. As a parent i have no problems being able to speak to staff concerning my children and this is very workable to me as a busy parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2004

River Ridge is a great school for any high schooler. It's a very diverse school, so it's great for other students to meet people outside their racial background. The teachers there are very helpful, and have a good experience. The school is only about 10 years old, so the building is in great shape! The girls basketball, volleyball, dance team, and track team here have all gone to state in the 2004-2005 year! I highly recommend River Ridge High School!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2004

Very diverse school, the best thing about River Ridge is all the various cultures and backgrounds. Everyone gets along with each other, you'd think that wouldn't be the case but it is.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 7, 2003

Although our daughter didn't attend elementary or middle school in this area, the faculty, staff, and students of River Ridge made her feel right at home. River Ridge's diverse student population has been a big plus. The drama department is wonderful!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2003

River Ridge High School has quality programs for all students, to wit, regular education, special education, MESA (as a club), Drama, etc. It also has a wonderful library which encourages River Ridge students to use electronic sources of information for research to make up for any holdings it might not have locally. In summary, River Ridge High School has a wonderful learning environment rich with diversity, and provides a safe, nurturing learning environment for all. Parent involvement comes in the form of joining the 'Booster Club'. - Steven Shippee
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

157 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
85%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
13%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

252 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
55%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
56%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
33%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
0%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students62%
Female62%
Male63%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanic65%
Multiracial52%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Low income55%
Not low income72%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students92%
Female86%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial80%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income88%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students89%
Female85%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White89%
Low income86%
Not low income91%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students24%
Female28%
Male21%
Black18%
Asian31%
Asian/Pacific Islander29%
Hispanic47%
Multiracial27%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Low income23%
Not low income25%
Special education5%
Not special education28%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students63%
Female68%
Male59%
Black63%
Asian54%
Asian/Pacific Islander57%
Hispanic61%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low income54%
Not low income71%
Special education54%
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students54%
Female54%
Male54%
Black27%
Asian65%
Asian/Pacific Islander68%
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Low income52%
Not low income56%
Special educationn/a
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students16%
Female12%
Male20%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Low income17%
Not low income15%
Special educationn/a
Not special education14%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students37%
Female33%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial40%
White47%
Low income47%
Not low income32%
Special educationn/a
Not special education39%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students8%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students0%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education0%
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

267 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
31%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

268 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

232 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
39%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

258 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students82%
Female89%
Male76%
Black88%
Asian83%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic85%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income79%
Not low income85%
Special education46%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students83%
Female91%
Male76%
Black77%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic82%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income75%
Not low income90%
Special education46%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 50% 60%
Hispanic 14% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 7%
Black 11% 5%
Two or more races 11% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 3% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 238%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 64%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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8929 Martin Way East
Lacey, WA 98513
Website: Click here
Phone: (360) 412-4820

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