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GreatSchools Rating

Lakes High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

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40 reviews of this school


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Posted Sunday, August 17, 2014

The staff at lakes are not competent. Teachers share their personal life with students(very unprofessional). I made numerous meetings with teachers and vice-principals and nothing gets resolved. The staff profiles minorities and are very racist. No one pays attention to kids who are failing. They set some students to fail and not pass classes. The counselors are very incompetent. They don't know their students and the students needs. They just place students in classes that the student don't need. The quality of education is poor and the staff caters to those who they want to see succeed and do not cater to the whole student population.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2014

I was a student at Lakes as a Freshman and sophomore for '10-'12. This school is fairly average when it comes to academics. The programs offered aren't outstanding, but they're pretty good. And as some have said on here, if you try, you will succeed. And if someone wants to go the extra mile here, they are fully capable of it. The athletics are good too; I participated in the swim team, water polo, and volleyball. They all had good programs, and were very friendly. The art programs are great, well funded, and generally successful in the case of the choir and band. Culturally, the school is pretty diverse. There does tend to be some drug problems, but it isn't in the way of most students and doesn't cause a problem for most either. All in all, it's a pretty good school, and I would recommend going there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2014

i love this school as being a student because its laid back and you can get good grades easily and the teachers are nice if you don't cause trouble. but if you are a parent you might not like this school for your child because they can do whatever they want and probably not get caught for it . education is "okay" I've seen better education at other schools and there are a lot of suicides here& weed .. probably because of the Washington weather. but other than that i love Lakes High School i had a great time. GO TO LAKES!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 25, 2013

Worst school ever!!' I have had 3 children at Lakes & Their "counselor" dropped the ball on every one of them. She didn't change their schedules when my children & I came in to talk to her about it. My 1st daughter ended up graduating late & my other two were moved to CPTC to pursue their high school diplomas & get a degree that would help them find a good job. I am completely & utterly disgusted with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2013

I think this school is very satisfactory and will continue to stay here. I hope to see a bit more improvement with scheduling though.


Posted May 14, 2013

To the staff member who wrote about the focus being on athletics only. Your gripe is old, outdated and pathetic. You didn't get more money for your BRAND NEW facility- you still went over your budget, and you ended up costing the school $ because you tried to change things yourself. You tried to take over areas that were not under your jurisdiction and you got reprimanded for it. Leave and let somebody competent in modern technology take over- they would be thrilled. Lakes was rated one of the top 5% of Washington Schools last year. Test scores consistently go up. Leadership and service programs are outstanding. Full WASC accreditation. Non-athletics programs like music, choir, drama, AP testing, ROTC, leadership, etc are celebrated daily. Lakes had a student with a perfect score on the SAT. Every year students go to military academies, Ivy League Schools and other top universities. Yes- they have a great athletic program too, but anyone who takes time to look into the school sees that it is about so much more than that.


Posted July 15, 2012

Lakes High School has a very firm focus on the athletic side of schooling, while ignoring the more important intellectual side. The anti-intellectualism movement that has been plaguing our nation for centuries is very prominent here--students who are not involved in the sports programs are often shunned. Not only do the students' peers hold prejudice against the intellectuals, but the staff at Lakes also participate strongly in favouring brawn over brains.


Posted March 5, 2011

Attending Lakes High School as a Freshman, I can definitely say it is one of the best schools in WA. From academics to sports, Lakes continues to astound me as well as the community. Lancer pride all the way.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 30, 2009

Lakes High School is an amazing and vibrant place. However, you get what you give. If you try, you will succeed, no matter what. There is tons of after school help and the majority of teachers are willing to go the extra mile for you, but only as long as YOU take THEIR time seriously! Communication is constant, teachers attend their students' games, and treat us like adults (not just when it serves us; always). Don't we all want to be treated like adults? Some will be your friend, some will be there just to teach you, many wish to be both. It's up to how YOU approach the situation. They give you respect until you take it for granted. If you need to be babied, attend a private school or be home schooled! The education Lakes provides is great as long as you are willing to be taught!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 2, 2009

Lakes High School serves a diverse student population at a very high level. The Life Skills program gives students with extreme needs hope and a place of belonging. The Advanced Placement Program continues to grow. Graduates are accepted into prestigious universities and military academies every year. The choral program is one of the best in the nation receiving numerous awards. Nearly half of the student population comes from military families which brings a vibrant cultural mix to the school community. More positive attributes about Lakes can be said but I'll leave that to the next reviewer.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 29, 2009

Folks that say that communication is poor, have their heads in the sand. I have a senior and a junior at Lakes. I receive newletters, e-mails, and recorded phone calls, with everything we've ever needed to know. Short of a knock on the door and a face to face invitation, the school does more than it's part in keeping parents informed. Let's not forget the students part when it comes to smaller events like a sports banquet. Some people would rather blame the school than hold their child accountable. As far as the relaxed rules about food and drinks, cell phones, etc., true some kids don't do well with 'distractions,' but others do very well with them and appreciate the drink of water. So they get to use their cell phone to take a picture of the assignment instead of writing it down. Sounds smart to me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2009

I am a student at Lakes and I personally love it! The experience you take away reflects directly how you choose to experience Lakes. We have an amazing choir, superb athletics, great JROTC program (full ride scholarships) and every year we add 2-3 clubs. Most teachers here truly love to work at Lakes and commute long distances just for the opportunity to teach at such a diverse school! As for the cell phones, other electronics, food and drinks- that helps many students. Cell phones are allowed in passing periods or free time that is earned as are other electronics. Some teachers even allow us to listen to our iPods and mp3s as we do our work so it is easier to concentrate. Food and drinks also help students concentrate until lunch. Communication between the school and home is also excellent. The majority of graduates leave with at least one scholarship.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 27, 2009

This school, the administration, and the district it is in are all very unsatisfactory. There is little to no communication between staff and parents, completely disrespectful students (the vast majority anyhow), and the teachers do not know hoe to maintain discipline and an environment of learning in their classrooms. I would not send my kids there if my life depended on it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 28, 2009

i love lakes, regardless of what others say. overall, we are a great high school and empower others with our commitment to having a safe, educational enviroment(:
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 25, 2009

Having left this nightmare of a school district three years ago, my opinion is a bit dated. While I was there, I was a highly involved parent (volunteering weekly, serving on committees), so I had ample opportunity to see the day-to-day happenings of the school and its administration. About the best thing I can say about this school is that at least it is head and shoulders above Clover Park High School. Oh, and if your child is into chorus (outstanding group) or football, they will be happy. The AP and honors options are pathetic compared to other schools we have experienced. The real problem, though, lies in the office of the Superintendant of the the Clover Park School District.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2009

I am a parent with 2 children at Lakes. I find the principal and the administration, in general to be lacking. There is not much communication from admin to parents. Opportunities are presented only to those kids that have parents that are involved and/or stay on top of things. They had SAT prep classes however, it was not put out to the entire junior/senior student body. They had college fairs but juniors were not informed until the day of. The principal is was not present at during either of my kids orientation and one was a freshman. I tend to see him only at sports events. If I had to do it over (and could afford it) I would have place my kids in private school or moved off post. RUN....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2009

Lakes High School, is a good school, but it requires students and parents to hold the administration accountable. If you are willing to get involved in your education Lakes High School is as good as any other school. I would say that its biggest drawback is the school district it's in. The district tends to cite the diversity and the military base as an excuse for the lack of higher standards of learning. Overall, the faculty at the high school cares about students which is the most valuable asses of Lakes High School, just remember to take responsibility for your education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 24, 2009

This school is easily the best school that my children have ever gone to. I had two students graduate from this school and both of them recieve full academic scholarships to 4 four universities. There is no better school in the area because of the diversity, academics, sports, extracirriculars, staff and students. What is even more intriguing is the fact that Lakes will have a new school soon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2009

This school is not a top notch school. The leadership of the principle is very poor. The students are allowed to do many things that are unacceptable in many schools around the country. These students are allowed to bring and use devices (cell phone, PS3, Ipods, etc) in school and class. They are allowed to eat and drink in the classes, which are all forms of distractions for learning. But shockingly, they are allowed to cuss like truckers. They have no respect for a lot of elder figures. My daughter now attends a school in South Carolina and is an Honor Roll student oppose to failing almost all her classes in Washington. She said the difference between the two schools was that in WA they never cared or helped or respected you like they do in SC. Having these 3 things obviously makes a difference in our children. It's quite sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 21, 2008

Lakes High School is not exactly 'top-notched' as some reviewers have stated. I mean its average. One AP US History Class, 2 students in the AP Biology Course and I can list more. As you can tell Lakes is not quite the magnet school, but there is no relative gang activity [at school atleast ]from what I see or blatant selling of drugs. However with the exception of a few, Lakes lacks teachers with high expectations from the students, concurrent with the highly UNmotivated students. One advantage I would say about Lakes is that it is sports oriented and those who are motivated enough will find opportunities and plus you can steal all the scholarships because we have like less than 50 who ever have a 4year 3.0 and above. Another good thing about Lakes is that it is diverse. But the best in the area..bc the lack of available schools..
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

196 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
65%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

119 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
69%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
14%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

231 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
53%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
25%

2011

 
 
39%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
18%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
0%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students63%
Female67%
Male60%
Black56%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander57%
Hispanic53%
Multiracial73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Low income63%
Not low income63%
Special education35%
Not special education66%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students79%
Female74%
Male83%
Black47%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income76%
Not low income82%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Female93%
Male92%
Black62%
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
White95%
Low income89%
Not low income97%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Female24%
Male40%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Low income31%
Not low income37%
Special education24%
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students55%
Female57%
Male52%
Black30%
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander53%
Hispanic47%
Multiracial71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income44%
Not low income68%
Special education69%
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students59%
Female59%
Male58%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander43%
Hispanic55%
Multiracial58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income57%
Not low income60%
Special educationn/a
Not special education57%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students26%
Female32%
Male22%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Low income14%
Not low income45%
Special educationn/a
Not special education29%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students29%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education33%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

316 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
35%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

313 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

306 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
36%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

310 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students82%
Female89%
Male77%
Black81%
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanic77%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander80%
White83%
Low income78%
Not low income87%
Special education52%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students90%
Female96%
Male84%
Black86%
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic92%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islander100%
White87%
Low income90%
Not low income90%
Special education64%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 48% 60%
Black 16% 5%
Hispanic 15% 20%
Two or more races 11% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 243%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 53%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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10320 Farwest Dr SW
Lakewood, WA 98498
Phone: (253) 583-5500

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