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GreatSchools Rating

South Whidbey High School

Public | 9-12 | 527 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted March 1, 2013

South Whidbey High school is the perfect small town American school. I have had two daughters in this high school, and one is off at Harvard in her third year. Small schools thrive on accountability which becomes a tremendous asset to both academics and to social health. The staff and teachers have provided excellent teaching and resources during challenging economic times. The athletic and extracurricular programs are great. Thank you SWHS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2013

The four period day at SWHS, along with shrinking enrollment, has made scheduling a nightmare--especially if your student is in band. One "extra" class as an underclassman, and your child will have to give up chemistry, physics, additional foreign language, or band (for example) as a junior or senior--or pay to take a class online. At the same time, registration requires students select six alternatives! If your student gets a class s/he didn't really want or need, s/he is stuck. "You signed up for it!" the counselor will say. Hmm. Choir is now an after school club. Spanish is the only world language offered. The classes of 2015 and 2016 are required to take two years of world language. The four period day makes it difficult for students to do Running Start or internships during the school day. Some graduates DO end up going to Ivy League schools, but many others don't test into college level math at the community college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2012

SWHS is a great school. Athletics have been good, some years great. Academics are good and you can get a great education if you choose the right teachers, which is the same in any school. Many of our AP teachers and classes out perform private schools across the state. There are many ways to be involved in the school and community and the blame cannot be put on the school if a student chooses not to be involved. You get out of the school what you put into, if you want a great education there are the tools necessary to achieve one.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 22, 2010

The review submitted October 12, 2007 hit it right on the head, but it's worse now. We've had 4 kids go through SWHS, and I have wished many times that we could have moved and/or sent them to decent schools on the mainland, but could not manage it. Band, AP classes and Running Start have been the only saving graces. I know there are teachers at SWHS who care, but the kids are not getting a good education (see "board" student reviewing 5/11/10). I was amazed to find that the kids are routinely given photocopied novels in English, and yet the teachers have new electronic blackboard setups this year. What??? When Our first child started kindergarten in 1990, there were so many more families with children on the island. Now, enrollment is so far down, schools are closing. Weekenders and vacation home owners are more and more plentiful. This is no place for kids anymore, and SWHS does not prepare students for the world after high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2010

South Whidbey has an unsatisfactory approach to 'higher' learning. I have attended a few high schools and found that SWHS lacks academically challenging courses. During my time here I have been extremely board in my academic career. I f you are looking for a school for its art department you choose right, but not for academics. Two programs that this school has going for it are its football program(single A), and its high school fire fighting.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 25, 2008

The academic program is outstanding and the people are all friendly and wonderfully competitive.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 14, 2007

I am a senior at this high school and I love it. It's academically challenging, is full of excellent teachers, and is part of an amazing community. It was given a National Blue Ribbon Award for Excellence by the US Department of Education (one of 300 schools nation wide to earn this honor). It is number 1 in the state for its size. It has an excellent arts program, athletics are usually pretty good (with football finishing 2nd in Conference and 12th in state), and there are many great extracurriculars. So maybe textbooks aren't in great shape, who says that text books are the best way for kids to learn? We are living in an evermore paperless world, and I for one think it's better that teachers are opting not to use textbooks because it means that they spend their class time teaching and not simply having their kids read.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 12, 2007

I have a student attending this school. Declining enrollment and high administrative turnover are taking a toll on the quality of education, communication, technology available. This area has gone from family friendly to mainly retirement and vacation. While I find the environment to be safe for my child and the overall attitude of the students to be very welcoming and kind, I am not happy with being in the middle of a district in transition. The band program is great. My child isn't in band. Too bad for us. The textbook situation is so bad many teachers opt not to use them at all. Most parts of the website haven't been updated in years. The only of my child's teachers to post online grades and comments is the PE teacher. I am not sure we will stick around this district long enough to send our second child to this high
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2007

I have a student attending SWHS right now and another that will start there next year. My overall impression is that it's a decent school, however the text books need serious updating and enough for each class would be wonderful. I appreciate the teachers that keep their online grade books updated so that I can keep track of what my kids are and aren't doing but so few of them keep them current. The teachers have been very willing to meet with me when I have concerns about my daughter's progress. They do what is necessary to help my daughter stay on track or get back on track if she's having problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2006

Very high quality if selective...but best to see counselors to assure good placement and to get good support and guidance...there is good babysitting available also for those not interested in learning... the school is known for its art programs and phenomenal teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2006

I think this school is kind of bad in quality. Its arts/music/drama program is ok though. Choir class, and band are great!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 21, 2005

Best non private school in the state. I have never felt more cared aboved or loved by these teachers. They are honestly motivaded by helping students succeed in education but more importantly life, school was above states average in test scores. Great sports and club coaches. Never could see myself be anything other then a falcon.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 6, 2005

The best group of people on the planet. Having attended Lynnwood HS in the 80's, I just wish I had attended SWHS. Maybe I would have actually learned something (the way that my kids are now)!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2005

I'm a student there now and it's a pretty good school. Most of the teachers care about the students and there are a lot of clubs and sports opportunities.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 10, 2004

I am a former student. I think South Whidbey High School was a decent school with most of the teachers actually caring about the students abilities and understanding. The books supply could have used some updating and a few more books, enough for a class would have been nice. The lunch choices were various and, for once, actually consisted of healthy choices in addition to the normal junk food. The only bad thing about South Whidbey was that there is almost no diversity at all, especially among the administration and teachers. This is not really a fault of the school, no tricky lines were drawn around all white communities or anything, there just aren't anything but white people on Whidbey Island.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
56%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
76%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
92%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
88%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students77%
Female78%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income71%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students95%
Female90%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Female25%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White44%
Low income58%
Not low income26%
Special education33%
Not special education37%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students62%
Female60%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Low income65%
Not low income61%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students94%
Female95%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

125 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

126 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
54%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students85%
Female89%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income87%
Not low income85%
Special education53%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students89%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income90%
Not low income89%
Special education87%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 91% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Hispanic 2% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 19%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 220%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 66%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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5675 South Maxwelton
5675 South Maxwelton Road
Langley, WA 98260
Phone: (360) 221-4300

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