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GreatSchools Rating

Medical Lake High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted March 21, 2011

I have experience having children in elementary, middle and high school in the Medical Lake School District and am GREATLY disappointed!! Expectations overall are incredibly low and the sudents are not held accountable. Sure, the teachers are nice, but the education is lacking on multiple levels!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2011

This school has very few AP classes. It told me nothing about Running Start. They left me feeling extremely unprepared for college besides a select few teachers . Advisory period is the biggest joke as students sit around on their cell phones and gossip. The clubs are usually unorganized and do not have much leadership or guidance. McSmith and his followers seem to be more concerned with making as many changes to the school as possible regardless of consequences rather than making a few changes for the benefit of the students.


Posted May 8, 2009

For the most part this District is not the best choice if you have other options. There are a few good teachers. However, District administration has little concern for academic excellence and seems to be more concerned with cutting budgets for school programs rather than taking personal pay cuts. The school district administration and district office operate secretly in handling parents complaints and issues. Most things are swept under the rug by this tight knit group of individuals who work closely together in formulating parent responses to any complaints or suggestions. Teachers fall in line and say what they are told to say. This district needs a complete overhaul from the top down.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2008

First of all let me say that the teachers of this school that my son has had the last 3 years have been wonderful! Everyone my son has had has been very approachable and helpful. My disappointment with the school comes from various different levels otherwise. Clubs should be before school or after school, and not during the advisory period. Advising is a joke at this school; I contacted my son's advisor in his junior year about college prep. and she said they don't even address it until Senior year, which is far too late to begin the process. Pam Veltry, the school superintendent needs to be voted out! She is more worried about getting new offices for the district than she cares about books, classes or quality hot lunches for the students! Their priorities are messed up; I have had to fight to get books for some classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2008

At my daughters request, I have pulled her from MLHS and she will now be attending a private christian school. The school needs to really start thinking more about the education of the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 20, 2008

MLHS needs great improvement. MLHS has some really awsome teachers but there are good and there are bad teachers. You can definately tell which ones are there just for their pay check those who don't care about the education of the kids. Students are constantly being put down, and if your a minority in the school its 10 times worse off for them. They need to re-evaluate what is really going on. Many parents and students have brought such issues to principles, and higher authority and nothing seems to get done. Its not fair to the parent or the child, because in return the child gets repremanded when he or she returns to school. Don't get me wrong there is a great handfull of teachers who give the time to work with their students and get to know them one on one and know whats going on in their lives.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 15, 2008

I have been in the Medical Lake School District since kindergarten. My experirnces there have gotten worse and worse. There have been many occasions in which I have brought a specific question or concern to the the principle that were soon discarded. I never felt like I was taken seriously. The teachers, howerver, do show genuine concern for the students and the counselors are superb
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 24, 2008

Small, homey, nice people. But the academic rigor is, well, there is none. The counseling service consists mostly of changing your child's schedule and does minimal to zero in helping kids push for college/scholarships etc. Teachers are not very demanding and accept late work as the 'norm'. The goal at MLHS is to graduate, but there does not seem much push towards having 'goals' outside of that. It's a very small school, and you get the hometown clique feeling--especially if you're not a local. Seems they keep some of the teacher's because they went to MLHS and live here--whether or not they are 'good teachers' isn't really the case. The one good thing is the communication between parents and teacher's, because it is so small. The skyward family access is a wonderful tool to keep tabs on a student's classwork. Teacher's need to raise the bar and push the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2008

I think the district s priorities are mixed up. It spends more on administration than students and learning. Overall I think the high school is mediocre and the middle school is the pits. If you have a child with special needs make sure you research everything you are told. Otherwise your child will not get the education they are entitled to. The high school counselor is a joke. He never follows through and I think he is incapable of doing his job effectively. My daughter didn t understand linear equations, we asked for help and the teacher said oh its ok a lot of the kids don t either. The reform math practices just sends her on without any understanding. The assistant principal at the high has no integrity. This schools needs to clean house and revisit its priorities and fast.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2007

In the three years that our daughter has attended MLHS, our experiences for the most part have been very positive. We like the small town feel of the school and the teachers seem to work really hard with the students and take the time to get to know them on a personal basis. Overall, we are very happy with the school's administration, faculty and quality of education our daughter has received at MLHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2007

This school is messed up! The school athletics are a joke. There was maybe 10 people in the stands for home basketball games. If my kids didn't have friends at the school and I could convince them to switch to Cheney, I would.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2006

I have two children at MLHS and they enjoy school their very much. Overall quality is good, but teachers and staff are working too hard to adopt education reform. I see some burnout going on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2006

My child has thoroughly enjoyed being a student at MLHS. She enjoyed the teachers and athletic programs there. She felt the school has a lot of unity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2004

Medical Lake High School is your regular small-town school. Where everyone knows everything about everyone, and more. While it's safe and protected, athletes are favoured, and the 'bad' kids get more attention and recognition than the 'good' kids.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 15, 2004

Medical Lake High School owns every other high school!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 19, 2004

Medical Lake High School has taken a huge turn. It could either be good or bad. They lost their Principal and their Athletic Director. The new Principal is a local man and will know the needs of this community better than the past few in this position. There is a new Football coach and a farely new Boys Basketball coach. Athletics have been on a great upswing the last season. The teams last year set a good foundation for the future of Cardinal athletics. There is a lot of extracurricular activities to keep the students busy and the oppurtunity for them to stay out of trouble as much as possible. The school is the perfect size if you don't want your kid going to a 'big or small school' yet if you feel your kids need to get out and meet different people the base provides students from around the world.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 29, 2003

Medical Lake High School has been a positive experience for our children. The teachers and administration provide awesome leadership and direction. Sports programs are developing and most kids are given the opportunity to excel. Overall I rate our school as excellent, safe and our kids are well taken care of.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2003

Overall the school, my kids earned good grades, atmosphere was friendly. Sports programs average, the only think is new students coming in to system, coaches favoring students who have lived there and come up through school system. Unfair but that's how it is in a small school/town (I guess).
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
40%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
68%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
74%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students57%
Female62%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracial55%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White54%
Low income61%
Not low income55%
Special education0%
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students31%
Female20%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low income39%
Not low income26%
Special educationn/a
Not special education44%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students74%
Female73%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income72%
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students88%
Female82%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income88%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students9%
Female10%
Male8%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White11%
Low incomen/a
Not low income6%
Special education0%
Not special education20%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

152 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

124 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
43%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students85%
Female85%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income77%
Not low income89%
Special education20%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students90%
Female93%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income85%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 74% 60%
Two or more races 12% 6%
Hispanic 10% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 7%
Black 1% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 18%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 232%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 63%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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200 East Barker St
Medical Lake, WA 99022
Phone: (509) 565-3200

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