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GreatSchools Rating

Mercer Island High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted April 28, 2014

As an active parent in the PTA I see the hard work put in by the administration, staff and parents to provide quality educational, sports, and leadership opportunities and programs in a positive environment with a culture of success. Go Islanders!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2014

Amazing! Our staff does everything they can to ensure students are feeling welcome, included and are engaged in the classroom. The administration makes sure we have clubs and activities that support all different types of students and personalities.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 8, 2013

My school is amazing. Went to Issaquah High for two weeks and realized what a mistake it was and moved back to this district. Kids are much better dressed. Teachers are amazing... Don't know what's up with all the other people saying it is bad.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 26, 2012

Mercer Island High School is not as good as the principal said; it is a lousy school and some of the math teachers don't know what they are doing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2012

Compassionate, dedicated teachers, and high standards, I'd like to give this school a higher rating. Unfortunately, there are over-crowded classrooms, incredibly spoiled kids and the place is riddled with drug-use/drug deals. The attitude of parents seems to be "If the kids are achieving in sports and academics I'll look the other way."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 17, 2011

Very good school with engaged students, parents and teachers. High achievement rates in and out of the classroom -- extracurricular are strong as are music, debate and athletic programs. Typical challenges for suburban high schools exist...but they are generally handled well. Always some areas for improvement (currently: some language areas, consistency among teachers, more reading/writing assignments in all levels of classes). There is a principal opening....the previous one left after 6+ years to get on the superintendent track in another district. Should be a great job for a leader who has a vision for the future -- is willing to make some important changes (see above) but most of all wants students to learn, love learning and be successful for their next step 9nearly 100% go to college).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2011

Mercer Island is an absolutely fantastic high school! I could go on for pages describing why it is. Let me break it down for you. 97% of MIHS grads attend a four year college after high school. It is an expectation at MIHS to do well in school and not slack off and skip. Our school has won the Washington State Scholastic Cup for the past two years that means our athletes grades averages were the highest in the state. Athletically Mercer Island is a true power house. We won state in 5 sports last year and won districts in many more. Around 80% students are involved in some form of athletics. MI also has a great culture. Kids usually enjoy school for the most part. Another cool thing is that all new kids find friends to hang out with within 3 days easy here. The students at MI simply are really nice, there is little to no bullying, no fights, no gangs. The kids are no where near to being spoiled little rich kids like so many of you believe. Our Achilles heel however is drinking. Its true that a lot of people drink alcohol occasionally on MI but its just because their friends are. Overall Mercer Island is a great school but i believe it is the Students that make the culture so good.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 16, 2011

To justify drug and alcohol use by saying "well, everyone does it" is a huge cop out. Everyone doesn't do it and there's simply no excuse not only for the rate of drug and alcohol use here, but for the parents who allow it. MIHS is a good school; but only if you fit the mold. The Mercer Island mold, is rich, pretty/handsome, athletic, and rich. Anyone else is in for bullying, being ignored by teachers, and left to drift. MIHS is not a great school. Kids do well because they have parents who can afford outside tutoring. It's well known on the island that we have a private/public school system. The faculty here are mediocre at best.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2011

As a former principal of MIHS, I am proud and pleased to see thisForbes.com objective measuring of schools rather than the Newsweek rating. That rating is determined by dividing the number of seniors in a school, into the number of students that took AP exams that year. A simple quotient does not fully measure the quality of a school. Having lived in the shadow of our neighboring school district placing two or three of their high schools on the "Newsweek Top 100 High Schools" list for years, it is gratifying to see this truly deserved recognition. A significant factor of this recognition is that it includes all of the schools in the city. This reflects the very high level of parent support and interest we have consistently seen at MIHS.


Posted May 7, 2011

BEST SCHOOL EVER! MIHS is the best school in the entire nation. It is filled with the most intelligent, athletic, social, and well-rounded students around. I have never seen or heard of a better school!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 10, 2011

This school is an incredible school all the parents and students who criticize Mercer Island High School probably did not do well academically. Our school is well known for the excellent teachers and our school does give out hard grades, but these grades are weighted so colleges know Mercer Island is a tougher school system and look at your GPA in a different way. Parents freak out when their child doesn't get an A and they pull them out and put them in private schools where they think they are getting a better education. They really aren't. You may say there's a lot of drinking and drug use but really its just as normal in many other ares and they are TEENAGERS. Honestly students are going to be introduced to these things in college so wouldn't you rather have your child learn their lesson in high school instead of in college when your future career depends on you being successful in college? moving to Mercer Island is a big obstacle but life's full of them so put on your big girl panties a deal with it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 17, 2010

Now people might think that because of the high test scores and the student drop out rate that MIHS is a great school, but it is not. MIHS has one of the worst drug and alcohol problems I've ever heard of, mostly due to parents. Parents on Mercer Island are more into defending their children rather than protecting their children. If there is a problem they simply hire the best lawyer they can get to keep their children out of trouble. The Mercer Island police department also does not do much to combat this problem as I have rarely heard of somebody actually getting in serious trouble. If I were a parent, I would consider it after looking at how great the academics are, but reject it after how terrible everything else is.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 3, 2010

We moved to Mercer Island from out of state and to Mercer Island solely for the school system. While I am more than ready to believe it may be the best the State of Washington has to offer-- the "best" here is so poor compared to average or below average on the East Coast, that it is not worth the cost of moving to MI. If I had know this two years ago, we would have chosen to live in a less expensive neighborhood, per haps in Seattle, and gone the private school route, which we are now doing anyway! It is the only way to get a decent education in this state!. IE in An underperforming highschool in New Jersey they have a 13: 1 student ration because they do not meet the norm of 11:1 here we out per form at 21:1 even thought the STate average is 19:1!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2010

I was somewhat skeptical about MIHS because I know Bellevue's AP participation is great. But my two kids (one a senior and one a sophomore) have absolutely blossomed there. They've had great teachers; the principal provides the right balance of leadership, management, and connection with the kids; and the coursework has challenged them to think and expand their horizons. The school has an ethic of always trying to improve that I think is important. It used to have the reputation of "resting on its laurels," but as far as I can tell, that's in the past. Math instruction could still improve; the curriculum's good and the teachers know their stuff, but some aren't too engaging with the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2009

I am a student at MIHS and I can proudly say that it is an amazing school!!! I love it!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 3, 2009

The students respect teachers, strive to learn, and aim for academic success. Teachers, administration, and students work together to accomplish students' preparation for life's goals, both social and academic. All take pride in success.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 14, 2008

My two kids attended MI HS. They liked most teachers, and respected the high bar they set, even when they complained about the difficulty or volume of the homework they got. I agree with the March 1, 2008 post by a student -- in the end *parents* have the responsibility to educate their kids to know to stay away from drugs and alcohol. One important thing that I havent seen mentioned yet is that BMW's in school parking lot put a lot of pressure and is cause for a lot of family discussion over priorities, over what car the kid should get and what is wrong with riding the school bus.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2008

I am a student at Mercer Island High School and I have only good things to say about this amazing school. The academics are spectacular, and are very accommodating for a public school. The sports are also quite fantastic, with devoted coaches and athletes. Spirit is also very prevalent at the school, and you will always see people sporting their maroon and white. As far as drugs and alcohol go, the school is no better or worse than your average high school. Those who say that drugs are everywhere and that you have to use drugs to be 'cool' have no clue what they are talking about. The statistics show that Mercer Island High School is right smack in the middle for drug use. Get your facts right!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 1, 2007

My daughter just graduated form MIHS, and is now attending USc. She loved the environment, academic challenge, sports and the many good and close friends she made during her high school years. Some of the teachers she had were five stars in every way, and the present principal is a warm, welcoming person, who really cares about kids. I am so glad my daughter had the chance to spend her high school years at MIHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2006

Great School . Great kids, teachers, administrators, parents, and community. All of the kids are very driven and get very high score ands grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
93%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
81%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

315 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
95%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
64%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students99%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income99%
Special education100%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Female32%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Low incomen/a
Not low income33%
Special educationn/a
Not special education41%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students89%
Female91%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income77%
Not low income89%
Special education59%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female98%
Male99%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

340 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

319 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

372 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
82%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

322 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students90%
Female92%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income80%
Not low income91%
Special education81%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students92%
Female96%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income93%
Not low income92%
Special education73%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 21% 7%
Hispanic 3% 20%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Black 1% 5%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 18%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 24%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 17N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 82%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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9100 SE 42nd
Mercer Island, WA 98040
Phone: (206) 236-3394

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