Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Henry M. Jackson High School

Public | 9-12 | 1930 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

30 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted February 2, 2014

When I first moved to Jackson, I was immediately greeted by friendly and welcoming people who genuinely care about the student and making you feel comfortable.Our school has a large team dedicated to introducing the freshman. Before school starts in the summer, the orientation is not your typical get-your-schedule-and-leave, but meet other new students and an experienced student at Jackson who will tell you the ropes and get you accustomed to the school layout and several fun activities to "break the ice" and then they serve food. The school has more clubs than you can imagine and your student will find one that they will feel right at home in. The teachers and students encourage reaching out to other students and there is a sense of community in the entire school. The teachers that I have had are some of the best teachers I have ever had in my life! They have fun and creative ways to teach and genuinely care about their students and the quality of education they receive. One thing I wish my school had was orchestra, but other than that, there's plenty of music, lots of athletics, encouraging a healthy lifestyle, great teachers a safe and friendly environment and awesome school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 2, 2014

Let's talk education. My school has some of the greatest teachers I've ever had. Teachers make sure that every student understand what they are learning and involve all students. Of the multitude teachers and staff that I have met, they are all friendly and willing to help. Say your student is a mastermind and maybe a Renaissance Man, there classes to fit your needs. In my pre-calc class, there is a range of students from freshmen, all the way to seniors. This may sound intimidating, but it helps knit our school together and not have a separation of classes where students are scared of the big seniors or afraid of freshmen cooties. Each class has got a handful of genius students and they're always there to help out a fellow student in need. Teachers care about the success of your future and you're falling behind, or if your grades are slipping, they provide opportunities to get back up there. Some teachers are harsh and passionate about the things they teach but they teach, and make sure you know what you need to know. The chill teachers also make sure that you're actually learning but some leave it up to the student if they want to learn or not.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 18, 2012

As a parent of three Graduates and one student still in Jackson, I find the parents and students who complain do not have much faith in themselves, or the school. My three Graduates loved Jackson and have all gone on to college and now have great jobs. One is a senior financial officer at Starbucks, one is a lawyer, and one is a buyer for childrens clothing for Fred Meyer, yes all that cute close in the boys department she picked out. If you put half and effort into it you can really come out of it with a great deal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2012

Both of my children have attended Jackson High School and I must say that II am most certainly not impressed with the quality of education. It seems that the school is more concerned with sports. There is a lack of discipline in the classrooms and instructors spend too much time with unruly kids who clearly don't want to learn. The school should offer more AP classes or IB classes so that students like mine and others can prosper and be ready for attending a 4 year college or university.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2011

Jackson has it's perks, but it's not my favorite school to go to. After my first year at Jackson, I have learned that they don't do much to honor the students who receive a high GPA, and spend too much money for sports and cheerleaders, when the money should be spent on the band, or more academics. I am not a band kid, but I support them and enjoy their music. Plus, Jackson is known for it's band going to New York to play at Carnegie Hall, but the Pep band is basically being ignored by the school. I think that more money should be used for academics and awarding those who do well in school, instead of sports and a couple million being spent on a cafeteria addition when the cafeteria we have now is fine.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 1, 2010

Despite high reviews from other students,I would have to disagree.From an honor student viewpoint,Jackson cares little about further improving the academic achievement of successful students due to lack of honor/ AP classes.For example,honor math&science classes are not offered,meaning that of your student will be mixed with students of all learning levels. This provides a harsh learning environment,b/c the class pace easily becomes too fast or too slow for certain students. Academic quality also depends on the teacher.Teacher quality vastly ranges. There is an excellent English program, but the math and science departments are lacking(they may be improving with new teachers). It really depends what you are looking for in a school,b/c Jackson does have good extracurricular options. Jackson is just not for advanced college prep-with the exception of 1-5 standout students. Most graduates attend a WA college -either a CC or a 4 yr. Only ~20 go to UW.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 9, 2010

My son is a student at Jackson High School. I am a high school teacher in another school district. I have had the opportunity to view Jackson from both a parent and teacher perspective and I am impressed beyond measure. My son came to Jackson after having failed miserably in a different district. At Jackson, they immediately worked to give him the extra support he needed. He was placed in algebra AND algebra support. He was placed in English AND an English support class. He made wonderful progress and ended the year successfully! Whenever I emailed his teachers they responded immediately, and compassionately. The parent access for grades and their children's assignments is unbelievable. I can not thank the Jackson principal and staff enough for what they provide for their students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2009

I am a current student at Jackson and so far the school has tought me many things. The Academics are extreamly tought but rewarding and the athletics are scond to none. The School will have a couple of bumps in the way but it helps the students turn into better learners and the teachers and counselers all are there to help us .
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 20, 2009

I am a current student at Jackson High, and to all the parent whom say that Jackson teachers need to motivate the students to do better. Think again, Jackson Teachers are the only reason I am still in school, if it weren't for them, I wouldn't be returning this year. Furthermore, you, as the parent, should be motivating them to do better. That's your job, the teachers do their part, when will you do yours. Yes, agreed, there are some teachers who don't deserve to be teachers. But where are you going to find a school where this isn't at least one bad teacher. Every where has bad teachers. But overall, the school is great, there may be a bad problem here and there, but that's your job, as the parent, to teach your kids to not give into peer pressure or not make mistakes.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 3, 2009

Good art and music programs and highly educated, strict and fun teachers.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 23, 2009

I attended Jackson, graduating in 2005. I went to Mill Creek Elementary and Heatherwood Middle before that. When I attended, the school was severely lacking in its math and science programs. Teacher turnover, especially in the sciences, was terrible. Three of my four science teachers had been there less than 2 years. I went on to UW to major in engineering, and my poor background really held me back the first two years until I could catch up. In contrast, the english program is excellent. Students graduate with great writing skills and are well prepared for a major in the liberal arts.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 16, 2006

Excellant accessbility to sporting fields
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 6, 2006

Excellent school with good tech program. Many good teachers with a few bad mixed in. But most teachers are excellent. Good language program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2005

The technology at the school is good. Being a fairly new school, it is pretty clean. Some math teachers are not good. Quality of teachers are about average since there are superior ones and mediocre ones.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 1, 2004

I stumbled upon this site while looking for the Jackson website. As an alumni of Jackson (Class of '97) I was amazed at some of the comments that were posted to this site. Since most of these comments are coming from parents it is really sad to see how little they understand about High School and then College. Jackson and it's 4x4 day helped me 100xs better prepared for college than I would have had I attended a six period day. While at Jackson I was able to take to UW English courses and Advanced Calculus all while still being able to enjoy athletics. Parents who say things like 'sometimes the kid just needs that D' are doing a disservice to their kids and need to recheck their priorities. High School is not meant to be easy it is meant to prepare kids for the future.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 14, 2004

overall i think this school is terrible. The teachers are not all responsible. I think they should improve their teachers motives to teach kids better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2004

Jackson high school can be good but it can also be terrible. There are many good teachers there but there is also one or two terrible ones. Jacksons math department isn't very good but there are a few exceptional math teachers. Like many public schools students have to deal with the buracracy of the school system which i think is terrible at Jackson. If you don't want your son or daughter to be pushed around by worthless rules this school is not for you. They have very good musical programs and an abundance of usefull after school activities. As long as you fight through the system and get the good teachers this school is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2004

I am currently a sophomore at JHS and love our standards. I am not happy about changing from a 4 period day to a 6 period day. I find it funny to see many parents complaing that JHS is 'to hard' for their child, but yet it doesn't offer enough AP classes. One reason JHS is changing is becuase a small, but loud group of parents are unhappy with standerds at JHS. (To high or to low) However, many of the students at JHS are happy with the standards and especally the shceual. Many feshmen don't think they will like the 4X4 day until they experence it. in a 6 period day we won't have enough time in a 6 period say for the year to met mininum college standards. Maybe if parents talked to their child they would find their student is/was happy with the standards set at JHS.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 4, 2004

As a student at JHS, I feel that Jackson's 'problem' does not lie within the 4x4 system, but within our lack of administrative presence and poor teaching staff. Although there are a handful of remarkable teachers at Jackson, many are teaching classes they are not qualified to teach or simply do not care about the educational well-being of the students. Despite the negatives associated with the 4x4 system, there are several postive aspects to the 4-period day. There is more student-teacher communication, classwork can be further explained if a student does not understand, and the graduation requirements are catered to entering a 4-year university (ie Foreign Language required to graduate, and 3 Math credits vs. 2 credits, etc.) Overall, I feel that Jackson would be a lot more promising and better-viewed if our staff and administration was upgraded, and the 4x4 system was not considered the root of the problem.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 5, 2004

Many parents variance their children out of H.M.Jackson High. Many parents I talk to are disatisfied with their child's educational experience and find no one willing to listen to their concerns. Obviously there is a problem - whether it is due to administration, schedule or poor communication is unclear. My student is a 10th grader who had a terrible experience with 9th grade honors - teachers who did not seem to listen or care about parent or student concerns. The year was a wasted one for my student. I am optimistic that Jackson has the potential to be a great school. My student has had a few excellent teachers who worked hard to create an excellent learning environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

276 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
50%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

150 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
96%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
39%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

369 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
84%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

189 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
53%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
50%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
47%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students73%
Female73%
Male72%
Black58%
Asian74%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic53%
Multiracial72%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income61%
Not low income77%
Special education39%
Not special education74%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian98%
Asian/Pacific Islander98%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students17%
Female21%
Male13%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic23%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White18%
Low income13%
Not low income19%
Special education9%
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students82%
Female83%
Male81%
Black67%
Asian85%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic68%
Multiracial73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income66%
Not low income87%
Special education37%
Not special education85%
Limited English36%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students72%
Female74%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low income64%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students28%
Female24%
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Low incomen/a
Not low income35%
Special educationn/a
Not special education30%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students31%
Female13%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White35%
Low income23%
Not low income38%
Special educationn/a
Not special education31%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

469 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

475 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

454 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
66%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

466 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students91%
Female93%
Male89%
Black100%
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income85%
Not low income93%
Special education59%
Not special education93%
Limited English30%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students89%
Female91%
Male87%
Black76%
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income76%
Not low income93%
Special education74%
Not special education90%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 20% 7%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Black 3% 5%
Two or more races 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 12%N/A8%
Special education 16%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 69%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1508 136th St SE
Mill Creek, WA 98012
Phone: (425) 385-7000

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Goal Program
Everett, WA







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT