Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Olympia High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

28 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted January 17, 2014

This year OHS and the district hired new staff to focus on 504s and IEPs. Last year we could not get cooperation. Teachers maintained discretionary adherence to the 504 and many refused to provide accommodation. Comments indicated, they just thought my son a slacker and devalued his diagnosed legitimate conditions and the hurdles that come with it. It is much better now. Solicitous staff and help working with teachers. It is constant work as this public school focuses on the mainstream and the age-old methods. We can see they are trying to catch up with innovation but the system could use a hacking/a reimagining.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2014

I attended OHS freshman through half of my senior year. I believe if you read all of these reviews and take them as a collective mass you get a petty accurate picture. When I attended, the administration was a joke, as well as their bullying policy. I felt at times the bullying policy helped the bully more than the victim. It got to the point that the administration was required to parental permission to talk to me. I did well at OHS, but I tried. They leave many behind that choose not to attempt or succeed. The diversity of the school was good, but largely white compared to others in the area. I had some great teachers and two that I didn't care for out of four years. This is definitely a middle class school. Administration could use continuing education courses in bullying and students rights. I felt like many times the administration glossed over issues and tried to find the easiest way out instead of effectively dealing with the problems at hand. If you have no issues with the administration it was because you never dealt with them. I am glad I went there and had the opportunity because it prepared me for college.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 8, 2013

The demographics help the school to be at an above average level. Teachers are motivated and dedicated!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2013

I have a high achieving student at OHS, and it has been a positive experience so far. Classes seem challenging, homework required but not impossible amounts, teachers engaged. I feel she is learning time management skills and advocating for herself in the large environment. I cant speak to how the administration responds to struggling students or bullying etc, because we have not experienced those issues.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

We have two students at OHS, and are very happy with results. The level of expectation and support for future success is high. I read most of the reviews below, and acknowledge that every school will have some poor teachers, but most at OHS are of a high caliber and very dedicated. That said, one teacher from last year that was not great, but we told our children they must find a way to work and learn even with a poor teacher. This also can be a learning experience, and thankfully -- at OHS will be relatively rare. Our kids have access to great academic, sports and music programs, and are thriving -- despite being distinctly different individuals with different learning styles. There is a great deal of emphasis placed on the student learning how to self-manage time and effort. Online access to grades and regular emailed updates from the school helps us keep on top of homework. Online access to syllabi and homework assignments is great. Students are encouraged and supported with taking AP courses -- which means getting College credit while still in high school, saving us dollars and time in the future. No wonder this school is rated one of the highest in the US.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2013

No issues with Oly HS. Responsibility lies with the individual student - those who want to learn will get a great education - those who don't...well can't take the horse to water. Everything your kids need are at Oly. Well deserved repuation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2012

OHS is an elitist school, basking in their AP programs. Average students flounder. A science teacher has a long reputation of calling kids names in class. Within a month he had badgered my child to tears. A science teacher was placed on disciplinary leave. The non-science substitute in that class allowed students to watch DVD for weeks (Finding Nemo, Forrest Gump etc.) Feuding teachers shut down the Oly Bear Early Childhood Development program. Students surfed the net for weeks. A science teacher praises students with excellent answers to homework questions, while making sport of laughable answers to amuse the class. A teacher refused a request for a written progress report for my child, stating it was not in her job description. The administration refused my child s transfer to New Market Skill center because of a personal beef with me. This was overruled by the district superintendant. Average students or those sensitive to very public criticism you should explore other options. Do not let the administration/counseling office string you along or placate you. DEMAND ACTION IMMEDIATELY. They will try to string you along (conserving resources) until it is too late.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2011

I am a former student at this school and came from another HS in the area. OHS does prepare a student for college and has a higher expectation for students to do thier homework and assign them homework almost daily. The other HS I went to was Timerline who did not care about thier students and just "hands out" good grades for showing up to class and had barely any homework, if any (depending on the class).
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 9, 2010

We had high hopes for this school which seems to be coasting--actually slip-sliding--on its good reputation. Very disappointing--leadership is weak, teachers are still assigning word searches for homework (or no homework at all). LUCKILY my kids particpate in the Running Start program at South Puget Sound Community College and spend little time at Olympia.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

One day my son will go to this school, so I would love a chance to invest in the future of this prestigious institution. Olympia High School has a great reputation in our community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

What a great school. Great learning environment, lots of programs being offered. I like this school because my sons grades have improved and he seems much more focused.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2009

I am a current student and I heard great things about this school and was really exited, but when school started, it wasn't as good as everyone said. I had a really hard time trying to get into the right classes, and they leave the students clueless a lot. it's great compared to alternatives, but it's really not a great school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 29, 2009

Both my children graduated from OHS and were successful in very diverse colleges, one with a degree from TESC and the other from Harvard. Principal Matt Grant has led steady improvements to what was already a fine school during his tenure, and my children found their teachers to be ever ready to help. They related better to some than to others, which is to be expected.


Posted January 13, 2009

Administration is nothing to be proud of. Half the teachers actaully teach and help the students who struggle. Good academics but not a welcoming enviroment. I transferred schools because Oly was not somewhere I felt comfortable or felt I was getting all the help I could. It's okay.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 29, 2008

I am an ex-student and a preservice teacher right now and I have to say Olympia High School prepared me well for college. Expectations are high and the teachers strive to help you achieve what you want to whether that be to go on to college or get your diploma and go into the work place. This is a top notch school and hope that my children will attend there someday and hope to be a part of the amazing teaching staff there as well!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 26, 2008

My daughter participated in sports and got average grades but often expressed intense pressure to over achieve in order to get kudos-- overly competitive atmosphere from the top down leaves little room for other viable ways to be successful and happy in this world. It has a very standardized approach that suits one type of kid. The social pressure for things and clothing was immense.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2008

I think that Olympia High School really prepared me for college. However, I think that, like most schools, you, the student, is responsible for learning. Nobody else can learn for you. I think that the opportunities at Olympia High School are amazing and if you take advantage of them, you can have an amazing high school experience. If you choose not to, then Olympia High can just be publicly funded baby-sitting.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 2, 2008

Not only is Olympia High School one of the best high schools in the area, but it is ranked one of the top high schools in the nation. Many former students have gone on to do great things. The teachers are very dedicated to their students, and sometimes willing to go to great lengthts to help them out. Failure is not an option here, and the environment is friendly.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 18, 2007

great school, dedicated teachers and staff working together for every child's success. Parent out reach program is also great. Students are required to participate and help underclassmen.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

I'm a student at Olympia High School. I have to say that it is one of the best schools in this area. The curriculum is great, the teachers are great, the athletics are great, and the clubs/extracurriculars. I did read a few of the previous reviews and I have to say on the ones that disapproved of Olympia, I would have to disagree. You say that it only caters to caucasions and it's all about the honors kids. We do take pride in the fact our school is high in academics, and at the same time our teachers work hard to help everyone achieve their best. We have a ton of diversity at our school. In our students and clubs; students hold assemblies about things our school should be aware of or our different clubs for whatever your into. We also constantly have works of the students in our halls.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

183 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
81%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

150 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
98%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
52%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

337 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
82%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
92%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
50%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
82%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
70%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students70%
Female72%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracial81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income60%
Not low income73%
Special educationn/a
Not special education70%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White99%
Low income100%
Not low income99%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students43%
Female40%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income21%
Not low income55%
Special education16%
Not special education52%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students84%
Female83%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic77%
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income63%
Not low income89%
Special education62%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students96%
Female93%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income95%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students14%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education14%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students50%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

404 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

402 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

423 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
73%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

398 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students95%
Female94%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian97%
Asian/Pacific Islander97%
Hispanic97%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income88%
Not low income97%
Special education74%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students96%
Female96%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic97%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income84%
Not low income98%
Special education85%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 75% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 7%
Hispanic 7% 20%
Two or more races 7% 6%
Black 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 17%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 220%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 70%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1302 North St SE
Olympia, WA 98501
Phone: (360) 596-7000

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools


Rising Tide School
Olympia, WA


Avanti High School
Olympia, WA





ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT