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GreatSchools Rating

Griffin School

Public | K-8 | 632 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted May 9, 2014

High parental involvement, dedicated teachers, and an administration that truly cares about what is best for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2014

Both my children attended Griffin elementary and middle school from 1st through 8th grade. This school is part of the Griffin Community and was instrumental in teaching my children the skills needed to succeed in high school and college. The friends they made at Griffin are life long.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2013

GRIFFIN IS THE BEST SCHOOL EVER! YOU CAN MAKE FRIENDS EASILY! DON'T JUDGE THE STAFF OR THE PEOPLE AT GRIFFIN CAUSE YOU DON'T REALLY KNOW THEM! THIS IS MY 9TH YEAR AND I'M GOING TOO MISS IT SO MUCH NEXT YEAR!!!! :-( I DON'T WANT TOO LEAVE! :-(


Posted February 14, 2013

Griffin is a wonderful school. My son is in special education and requires larges amounts of behavior supports as well as a smaller setting which Griffin bent over backwards to accomplish! We moved from Lacey to Steamboat Island just so he could go to this school. Most of the staff are great and the assistant principal is amazing (far better in my opinion than the principal). Unfortunately once leaving Griffin that small, supportive environment is completely wiped away as the kids enter the prison school from h*ll Capital High School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2013

My son is in Kindergarten which should be an excellent experience for a child he started his school year at Mt. view in Lacey. Dylan had nothing short of a negative experience, from their so called Hoot patrol to time out corner, being sent to the principal, even suspension. I have never had such a experience from a school , any way we moved out on steam boat island and he started Griffin elementary in November of 2012. Never have I seen such a transformation from a 5year old child from a super negative attitude school teacher friends the whole nine yards. I just got his first progress report I am so happy with the progress. Thank you Mr. Finn and the rest of Griffin school district for changing my sons outlook on learning. Marijo Grable
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2012

I must agree with the comment that Principal/superintendent is not true to his word. He is intimintated easily. If it wasn't for the assisant principal there would be no leadership at all. It's ashame. If the Principal didn't think he was so 'high and mighty' there would be much more parent involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2012

Principal/superintendent is not true to his word. He tells you one thing and then does not follow through on that action or changes the action without first informing the parent. Appears to be a "yes" man, all talk and no action. Promises actions in the classroom that he is not able to get the teachers to "buy in to". Makes unprofessional comments, trying to make the parent feel guilty. Does not respond to questions within his own time frame. A majority of the teachers seem disinterested, burned out. Classrooms are geared toward the "middle of the road" students. Students operating above or below that level are out of luck, accommodations will not be made. I asked others why they think Griffin is a "great school" and they replied because of the parent involvement and because it is safe. Both good reasons, but, what about quality of education and good leadership!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2012

Both of my children graduated from Griffin after spending their whole elementary and middle school careers here. We loved being part of the Griffin family. It is a small, community driven school. We chose the school district then moved to the Steamboat peninsula just so that our children could attend, and then move on to Capital High School. It is the only K-8th public school in the county. We think the extra years a family spends at a K-8th school means that they are more involved, more committed to the school. Many, many parents volunteer in the classrooms and are very involved. Excellent teachers and strong leadership. I highly recommend!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2010

This school is amazing. Ive gone here for seven years and its amazing.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 18, 2009

I have 3 children who have been at Griffin since K-7 (thus far). This school has the highest level of education with a very home town feeling. We are a very close knit community. The teachers, staff, bus drivers and parents all feel very much like family. I have faith and trust in this K-8 school and feel my children have been truly blessed by being a part of the Griffin school system.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2009

Griffin is an outstanding school ! The staff and teachers teach to a very high standards! Parent envolvement is encouraged and even expected. I can not say enough about what a great K-8 District it is!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2008

I went to griffin from 4-8th grade and had an AMAZING experience there. Almost all the teachers love what they do. Discipline or safety was never a problem. Parent involvement is really high. The small environment is cool because all the administrators know your name. Great gifted programs. Really good school lunches. And, I'm pretty sure their library is both newer and twice as big as my high school library.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 6, 2008

The parental participation is phenominal and the teachers have been superb.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2007

Griffin School is wonderful. I have a first and eighth grader who attend school and I can not say enough great things about their teachers and programs. Thank you Griffin for adding such a positive role in my children's lives. I would recommend Griffin to any family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2007

This school has difficulty following through with the most basic special ed. programs. I feel it is also and unsafe playground situation, as even the victims of bullies get punished. Its very sad when a small girl gets punished for being slapped across the face. The principal cannot seem to get control of the bully situation at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2006

Great School. Brand new remodeld facility
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 21, 2005

I only wish that you could have spanish available, not only after school. But in class also. Its hard for us to pick up our son from kindergarten and then wait 2 hrs. Then take him back again. Wait 2 hrs then pick him up again.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2004

Great school! We just got a Gates Grant that gives us 7 computers in every classroom and 20 lap tops. The teachers and comunity really care about the students. Overall great school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 11, 2004

Griffin School is a fantastic school dedicated to the highest standards of education. Construction this year has been a challenge and the end result will be an even better learning environment for the children. The parent involvement is at the top of the list of why I have my children there right next to academic achievement. The kids always see a familiar face. I went Griffin and loved it. I wanted my kids to go there so we relocated from Seattle to live here. We've never looked back. The PTO is also very active and influential. It has been able to provide valuable services to the school. I love Griffin and wouldn't go anywhere else!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2004

While I really like the majority of the teachers, the school seems to have difficulty implementing the most simple of special ed help. Perhaps it is just the construction going on this year, but I am very disappointed at waiting so long for simple services, and them never following through. One other negative comment is about their hot lunches. Again, due to construction they knocked down their cafeteria. The food they are bringing in is awful! My children are very hungry after school, and say the food itself is really bad. Although the school is better academically than most, they are really having problems this year with the basics. Unfortunately, I have had to pull the kids off hot lunch as they have been asking for anything else.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
41%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
80%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female85%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income69%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female85%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income81%
Not low income85%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students72%
Female79%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low incomen/a
Not low income75%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female76%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low incomen/a
Not low income76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education76%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students65%
Female79%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low incomen/a
Not low income68%
Special educationn/a
Not special education68%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students87%
Female88%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income65%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female93%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income82%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female91%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income94%
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students78%
Female61%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income70%
Not low income79%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female80%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income70%
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female82%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income30%
Not low income82%
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female88%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income60%
Not low income89%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students83%
Female97%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income40%
Not low income90%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students58%
Female52%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low incomen/a
Not low income59%
Special educationn/a
Not special education61%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female77%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low incomen/a
Not low income82%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students85%
Female71%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Not low income86%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 60%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 2%
Hispanic 4% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 7%
Black 3% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 218%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 13N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Greg Woods

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
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6530 33rd Ave NW
Olympia, WA 98502
Phone: (360) 866-2515

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