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GreatSchools Rating

Orting High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted September 10, 2013

Orting HS has a very "small" atmosphere yet big ideas that are accomplished with goals set at the beginning of each school year. The students are all in all friendly and up beat. I enjoy the staff very much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2009

it's a good school with great teachers and staff
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2009

My son has been at OHS for two years now. He has some 'issues' that are taken very seriously by all staff. The Director of Special Needs Children is phenomenal! My son's grades have gone from failing almost all classes to a 3.6! What does that tell you that are considering having your children attend OHS. OHS has the best staff and communication of ANY school I have attended or had any of my five children attend. GREAT SCHOOL!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2008

I have 2 children in OHS. I like the school. I really like the staff. I know there are things that can be improved upon as with any school. I am also tired of parents complain because they don't know what's going on with their child. They have family access here. I can for check grades and missing work online. Any time I have contacted a teacher (by phone or email), they are more than willing to work with me to help my children get better. Parents are just as important in their childrens education as the schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2008

This school has gotten really bad over the past couple of years. There is no discipline and no leadership. The school is so overcrowded.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2007

Totally disgusted with the school. We have lost a lot of good teachers and the new administration is lousy. In comparing other schools, Orting schools are way behind. If your child is in sports he/she should do well, if not, expect problems. Special Education department is terribly inept. Great after school activities for younger kids, not much for teenagers. Great parent involvement for Junior/Seniors and sporting events. I encourage you to evaluate the type of education you want for your child before making this decision.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2006

In the process of significant staff turn-over. Losing best teachers. Sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2006

All four of my children are recently enrolled in the orting school district and I have some concerns. The schools are great when it comes to sports and giving the kids extra things to do after school. The teachers need to work on keeping the parents up to date on what the students are doing. The students seem to be running the school more than the staff are and I think that has something to do with why the district is running so far behind. If you rate where our students are in comparison to other schools and how the students are doing Orting district is way behind. That is the main concern.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2005

The quality of programs is decent, not the best but it is good. The availability of extracurricular activities is outstanding. They offer great sports programs where the kids can excel and show their talents. The level of parent involvement is okay. Not many parents of the underclassmen in the school care much. But parents of Senior class students have excellent participation. Discipline at Orting is kind of slack, they allow the students to basically run the school themselves, which in my opinion is kind of upsetting. Overall it is a great school and I am glad that my son is there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2005

What a great place to be!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2004

I dont think the teachers care about the quality of education. They just want the kids to attend school so they get paid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2004

The Orting High School staff don't have good communication skills when it comes to the parents. At times I've had to call or ask at conferances questions regarding my child only to have them 'check on it' and not call back. It's very frustrating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2003

Orting has a unique sense of community that is very evident in the school system.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
24%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
72%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
70%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
33%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
8%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students30%
Female36%
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Low income29%
Not low income31%
Special educationn/a
Not special education31%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students96%
Female95%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White95%
Low income92%
Not low income97%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students12%
Female0%
Male21%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White5%
Low income10%
Not low income13%
Special education13%
Not special education9%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students79%
Female74%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income82%
Not low income77%
Special education56%
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students71%
Female68%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income67%
Not low income74%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students28%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White18%
Low income30%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education29%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

183 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
34%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

171 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
45%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

167 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students89%
Female92%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income87%
Not low income91%
Special education53%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students89%
Female94%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic94%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income87%
Not low income91%
Special education56%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 60%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Two or more races 7% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 7%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 234%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 49%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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320 Washington Ave North
Orting, WA 98360
Phone: (360) 893-2246

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