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GreatSchools Rating

South Kitsap High School

Public | 10-12 | 2211 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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30 reviews of this school


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Posted September 17, 2014

Great teachers, students are very polite and friendly, lots of opportunities for students academically and with after school activities. Very large but that gives students lots of opportunities to be involved. Scheduling is sometimes difficult. Sports teams are good. Some of the building could use updating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

South Kitsap High school seems like a very good school so far. My daughter is a sophomore. The school is just so crowded. There should really be another High school in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

south kitsap highis very crowed. staff seems to have a good handle on running the school


Posted July 21, 2013

Amazing school I have never been to a school where all the teachers are willing to help every student out. There are so many choices of classes and opportunities to take advanced class that earn college credit. I went to Vashon island but was very disappointed they have a major drug problem and teachers are not willing to help out or provide extended learning opportunities and extra-curricular programs. South Kitsap is by far one of the best schools on the peninsula. Many of my friends went to gig harbor h.s. and peninsula h.s. and they all wish they would have never gone there because south cared and allowed for greater opportunities.


Posted July 6, 2013

Graduate of 2010. Suffered severe health issues in my senior year and because of the 7-absence penalty I almost didn't graduate on time even with documents on my poor health caused by the social anxieties of the school's overcrowding issue. Major drug problem with the kids on campus. Too many kids fall through the cracks because teachers didn't have the time to help them out. My sister is going through the same nightmare I went through, and she's in poorer health than me (it runs in the family). So far they've lost her health records twice, and she's had to purchase books outside of school because of the constant shortage regardless of the endless amount of fundraiser events. All they ever talk about is why there shouldn't be another school even though it's heavily overcrowded, because it would cause conflict between the sports teams. Speaking of sports, their physical education curriculum is outdated by 46 years.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 12, 2010

I'm a current student at SKHS, this is my first year attending the school, and I do not have a good first impression of it. There are two things that stick out the most when I started going to this school: One, it's overwhelmingly crowded and two, other students. The first one is very self explanatory, but when you come to other students...there are several teens that look like druggies, are noisy, and use obscene language. There's PDA going on in every corner. I try to make friends, but I just feel unwelcome and exiled from a majority of students. It's hard to come across good friends now a days. Everyone just seems to want to stay with people they only know...Then when it comes to the Guidance Office! Ugh, I feel that they don't promote students that really care about their education too well when it comes to class changes.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 14, 2009

I am a former student who just graduated. Sure, sports are a big part of the school, as it should be. High school isn't all about academics. If you want an academic challenge at this school you have to find it. If you need help, teachers and staff were always willing to help me out. I had fun there. It surely isn't for everyone. And as for bad teachers: every school has them, you have to expect more in a school where there are 2500 students!!


Posted November 15, 2008

Very scary place. A scary school in a scary town. Do not send your children there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 13, 2007

I am a 2003 graduate of South Kitsap High School. The 3 years that I spent at South were not always the best. However it was not until my Junior and Senior years of high school That I found teachers and people that really cared about what my long term goals for my future were. Mrs. Gabrielle Nelson who taught my Junior and Senior English courses was absolutely amazing! She is an amazing encourager and was one of my key influences when I chose to become a teacher. The others that have greatly influenced me were not at South but at West Sound Technical Skills Center in Bremerton. I found my time there to be fruitful and it ultimatly underscored my immense passion for teaching this next generation and to call them to a higher standard of not only academic excellance but immense pride in themselves.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 19, 2007

The school didn't care about students or anything other than sports and money. Even if you had a club or other group that made money, they took it for sports. Academia was completely ignored unless you were lucky and got some of the great teachers.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 12, 2007

My son started at this school 7+ months ago. This is his second year of HS but first year at the HS, since they spend the first year of HS at the JR High because there isn't room. Every trimester his teachers change. I haven't had much luck with getting responses via email from any of his teachers. Since there is a lack of feedback from teachers except at conference, there isn't much a parent can do to monitor progress. SKHS isn't likely to turn an unmotivated child into one that is. The short time a teacher spends with your teen doesn't allow for teacher involvement. It appears from my son's comments that his piers don't take the electives seriously even though there does seem to be a variety.Bottomline, an overcrowded school spells trouble for teens needing additional help. They just get lost in the crowd.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2007

Excellent class selection and good technical department. Good at transition resources. Not good teachers attitudes. Some do not choose to be involved with parents. Some teachers flat out will not be supportive, like they are only there because they have to be. Others teachers are great. It's a cultural attitude you get hit with that is disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2006

In my opinion, part of SKHS's overcrowding is due to the fact that we don't want to lose our 'cream of the crop' athlete choices. When we have so many choices, we can create a winning team. State Championships are important- enough books for each student?- Well, that's on the backburner. This school is much more concerned about how we end up at the end of the season than what our WASL results reveal. If we could spend as much money on academic excellence- enough books, enough desks, enough space, enough teacher/student time, we would have more than half of our SKHS students passing the WASL Math. Heck, if we had the same ratio of coach/player to teacher/student contact, I would be happy. Bottom line, my junior passed the WASL. That was her achievement- not the school's. BTW, my older daughter and I are both SKHS graduates. -Disheartened
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2005

I loved going to South Kitsap High School. Considering how many people went to that school with me, everyone seemed to get along with each other swimmingly.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 6, 2005

excellent school,excellent teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2004

As a former student at South Kitsap, I do have to say that it did pretty much try to focus on just 'Making the standard.' There was never a 'Lets exceed the standard.' With a student body of almost 2500 students, it was hard to manuver around and get somewhere on time. I am a graduate of 2002. From the sounds of things, once again they worried about one thing: Athletics. If you werent an athelete you were nothing. I myself was in the NJROTC program and was more of the 'spit on' because no one desired to care about what we did. Now I am in the military and still laugh at the fact that they still wonder where the atheletes went and not the soldiers that went to Iraq, or Afghanistan.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 27, 2004

I attended South and graduated 2003. I left with mixed feelings. It is a school that tried to do well with what they have. With a school this size, it seems things are looked at in a black and white sense. The environment/actions remain politically correct and decisions aren't always the right ones due to fear of just how the community will react. The community is not always supportive and the staff/policies aren't always understanding. The school is one of small town politics and friday night football games, striving for the typical instead of raising its standards. To me, it felt that importance was placed more on entertainment (football, cheer) then intelligent education. I left the school with a large circle of close friends but a disillusioned view of the educational system. It took me a year to finally rediscover an interest and thrill that can be had with learning and expanding.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted July 9, 2004

If the dropout rate is 8.2% and the graduation rate is 75% where is the other 16.8%. Who is cooking these books? Someone that took math at South Kitsap High School? Best school spirit? Who cares? This school is too large and too focused on sports. School levies will do nothing but add more administration and security officers. Find the statistics on where that money went last year. New secretaries, etc. No books. Classes with more students than books mean no homework.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2004

This is the first year I've had a student at South. I admit that the mere size of the school and the amount of students was overwhelming at first by both me and my son. We were both pleasantly surprised at how efficient the school organizes things so that it doesn't seem so big. They seem to have things down to a small science and I am confident that my son will get a good education there. He has many choices for extra curricular activities if he chooses and the school spirit is infectious. I have heard people say that South Kitsap isn't all about academics but it is all about sports. Yes sports are a big deal there but I wouldn't say it's any different than any other school. South Kitsap High School is a great school where kids can focus on whatever it is they want to and I am proud to be a parent of a child who goes there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2004

The last parent conference went smooth, and most of the teachers were friendly and seemed interested in helping the students learn to their full potential. The overall parent teacher conference's were very helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

705 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

657 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

731 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

647 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students87%
Female91%
Male83%
Black60%
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic87%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income80%
Not low income91%
Special education46%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students86%
Female92%
Male80%
Black70%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic89%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income80%
Not low income90%
Special education58%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

183 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
25%

2011

 
 
20%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

657 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
64%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

392 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
73%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
59%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
53%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
38%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students19%
Female18%
Male20%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander10%
Hispanic33%
Multiracial3%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White21%
Low income19%
Not low income19%
Special education22%
Not special education18%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students72%
Female73%
Male72%
Black60%
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander69%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial72%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income61%
Not low income79%
Special education46%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students69%
Female67%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asian46%
Asian/Pacific Islander50%
Hispanic76%
Multiracial73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income63%
Not low income73%
Special education48%
Not special education71%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students25%
Female24%
Male26%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic14%
Multiracial29%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Low income33%
Not low income18%
Special education26%
Not special education25%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students36%
Female31%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracial39%
White38%
Low income39%
Not low income33%
Special education29%
Not special education38%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students11%
Female11%
Male11%
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White4%
Low income16%
Not low income6%
Special educationn/a
Not special education10%
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students28%
Female32%
Male25%
Hispanicn/a
White33%
Low income25%
Not low income32%
Special educationn/a
Not special education29%
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 70% 60%
Hispanic 11% 20%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Black 2% 5%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 236%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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425 Mitchell Ave
Port Orchard, WA 98366
Phone: (360) 874-5600

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