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GreatSchools Rating

Chief Joseph Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 246 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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8 reviews of this school


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Posted July 23, 2013

Hello im writing this for a mouther friend who has a child that attends your school. His name is Taylor D Forsythe Who is involved in sports . (Ie} foot ball base ball ect.Unforently his father passed away very recent. Taylor wants to play football and we are sure the coaches woulkd like hie presents also.However we or i should say his mother has no idea how or when sigh up dates are. Because hie father handled all of those things.So if it is at all possable could some one get this message to the correct staff member. so that taylor can play ball this year . Misty hahnn (mouther) 509 302 3236,sharon Ferrell (grand ma) 509 946 5940 . Johnny Cozzetto ( friend ) 509 582 6222. Please Help Thank you Johnny Cozzetto


Posted January 23, 2010

i go there and i love the teacher and most of the students i enteract with on a day to day basis
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 1, 2009

My son attended this school in 6th grade and it was wonderful. Academically the school pushed him to excel, he now attends a school where they don't expect much unfortunately. If we didn't live so far away he would once again attend Chief Joe, and if it wasn't 300 miles away I would gladly drive him there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2009

I love my school it's awesone. : ) have the best teachers ever.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 16, 2008

Two of my kids went to Chief Jo. It is an Ok school. There is a number of very good teachers there. Few extracurricular activities are missing compared to two other middle schools in the district. There is no math club or chess club. The school's test performance is not high, which makes me think that the principal leadership is not spectacular. The new discipline 'Make your day' program is a disaster. Kids waste at least 90 min every week of instructional time on grading their behavior in each class in front of their peers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2005

This school has a great staff that cares about the students and does a fantastic job of supporting the kids from all different academic areas. The students with good grades are given opportuninities to learn and grow in the classroom with enrichment activities and a variety of extra-curricular programs while the students that need extra help are supported, encouraged and provided with teacher assisted homework clubs and study skills classes that will assist them in keeping up.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted August 1, 2004

Chief Jo is a great school! Both of my daughters will be attending this year. My son went to Charmichael... we had nothing but problems with teachers and other students. Gang wanna be types were in abundance. I would never put a child through that again! Thank You Chief Joe Staff and great kids! Only one area I feel things should be changed... I dont see why 6th graders can not participate in sports.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2004

This school is incredible! My child has succeeded in so many subjects and she is an average kid. When she went to Carmicheal she failed most courses and was over stressed with to much homework on her shoulders. At Chief Joe she has achieved a lot, and though they still give homework it isn't that hard for the kids to get it done, and it isn't beacuse the homework is easy it is because at Chief Joe they look for an understanding, and the teachers accomplish that greatly. Once my daughter had an understanding for her school work she did awesome in her homework, school work, and major projects. If you are looking for a school for your child to succeed in pick Chief Joseph Middle School. Where your child's future is in great hands.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

206 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

206 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

240 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

238 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
61%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

233 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

228 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
35%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

226 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

225 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students53%
Female53%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic36%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Low income42%
Not low income67%
Special education20%
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female74%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic61%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income65%
Not low income81%
Special education33%
Not special education75%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students53%
Female53%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asian79%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic32%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Low income39%
Not low income64%
Special education19%
Not special education56%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female66%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asian79%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic43%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income44%
Not low income73%
Special education24%
Not special education63%
Limited English30%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students67%
Female79%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asian71%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic56%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Low income61%
Not low income72%
Special education29%
Not special education71%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students41%
Female43%
Male38%
Blackn/a
Asian55%
Asian/Pacific Islander58%
Hispanic15%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Low income32%
Not low income50%
Special education13%
Not special education43%
Limited English9%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female62%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic31%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Low income46%
Not low income69%
Special education7%
Not special education61%
Limited English9%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students61%
Female60%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander83%
Hispanic28%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income48%
Not low income73%
Special education62%
Not special education61%
Limited English9%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students85%
Female82%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income80%
Not low income89%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Students93%
Femalen/a
Male90%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education93%

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 78% 60%
Hispanic 12% 20%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 7%
Black 3% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Two or more races 1% 6%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 13%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 247%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 65%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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504 Wilson
Richland, WA 99352
Website: Click here
Phone: (509) 967-6401

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