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GreatSchools Rating

Skyline High School

Public | 9-12 | 1891 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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31 reviews of this school


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Posted October 23, 2013

Had to reply, as it seems a lot of the information is old on this website. Skyline does have many students who come from an upper-middle class family. They also have many who do not. But there are also many kids who have great hearts, irregardless of their financial circumstances. This is not a school where students can easily "slide by," and budget cuts have limited some of the variety of curriculum. One of the biggest complaints from my student was requiring so much PE credits even for students who have a school sport. I think they may be "preaching to the choir" here. But that is a district, versus a school decision and I am not sure serves the students well when it prevents them from taking other career-exploration electives that they could take. Principal Hechtman truly cares for all of her students...no complaints there at all!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2013

I am former graduate of skyline high school and can say that it s a miserable place if you don t fit in. It all depends on who you are, where you re from, and how much money you have. The students have a really nasty attitude towards minorities as well. I used to be in sports and the team members really didn t support each other as a team and even excluded some of their minority members. It s not a very diverse school unless whites and Asians are diverse enough for you. I would not recommend this school to anyone who is not white or Asian. I guarantee you won t make many or no friends at all. The environment is a hostile one as well. The students are very cliquish and they do all kinds of nasty things to each other. The environment is very competitive for a high school and there is a lot of pressure to fit in with the kids who are rich. As a minority with a disability I am not satisfied with the students or teachers.


Posted July 27, 2012

This school is great if your student is a star athlete or Ivy League bound. If your student does not fit into this category look at Issaquah or Liberty High. The teachers and attitude are better than at Skyline.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2011

Very rigorous courses. Way too much emphasis put on athletics to the detriment of other programs. As a parent, be prepared to be your child's only advocate is this is a large and impersonal school. Very cliquey and very spoiled kids. Your child will do well here if they are either very gifted academically and can tolerate the nasty kids or talented athletically. Please do not use my email.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2011

As I parent I am distressed to see the lack of fun and joyfulness in the students eyes, though it could be the lack of sleep they get. I think parents perhaps have set too great of expectations for our children and the students in turn feel a sense of competitiveness that doesn't allow for good friendships or the enjoyment of school in an atmosphere of brotherhood and sisterhood. The kids appear competitive, unsharing and unhelpful toward each other, even to the point of guarding their friendships from others. In this environment we will possibly have smart kids, yes, but quite possibly they will fail to learn the qualities that make them decent human beings. My child feels there are very few genuinely friendly students at SHS. It's such a shame. Please don't use my email address.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2011

If you don't have money and I mean lots of Money your kid will not fit into the Peer groups here. I finally had to transfer my child to another high shool because of it. The kids compete socially by seeing who can drive the most expensive car to school. My child saw a lot of drug usage as well. The athletes are put on a pedestal at this school and are allowed to slide through classes academically. If you care about your kid and are middle income send them elsewhere Like I did.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2011

I am a junior at Washington State this year, and i did not feel prepared for college. Instead, I felt left behind when I attended Skyline. Students can brag about their school all they want, but this is one that I would never send my children to. I hope that Skyline will turn for the better in the future, but I dont see that happening.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 5, 2011

Skyline lacks key qualities to make it even a fraction enjoyable. The other students are terrible. They know that their parents make triple what any teacher there makes so they feel superior, and the teachers unfortunately accept that. On to the topic of teachers. As a sophomore I have had only 1 teacher in the past 2 years that have cared about the students, and really care about their jobs. The classes , are designed for college level students. I would consider myself an average student, not that smart, but definitely not dumb. I could say truthfully that I struggle in every class that I am in. Now, skyline prides itself in being a "challenging" school, but for me to be STRUGGLING in every class, is completely unacceptable. The athletics are all based around football, which is quite frustrating coming from a volleyball player. The football players are also put on a pedestal and their academic infractions are almost always overlooked. My point here is not to vent about my teenage issues as a high schooler, but to bring up serious problems that are very present everyday in the halls, and classrooms of skyline high school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 5, 2009

As I student I can honestly say Skyline is a stressful place to be. I am currently a Junior (only 8 more days!) and this has been the hardest year for me. The teachers varry from exceptional to poor depending on the subject. Though the school is difficult I do feel it will pre-pair me for college. My older sister, who is attending UW currently as a junior, said Skyline is harder than college. If you are willing to stick it out, the reward is worth it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 20, 2008

Skyline is awesome. Some of these reviews say that the teachers are bad, and the classes are too hard, or that the students are mean but its not true. There is a great variety in rigour of classes and the staff is mostly good. Also the students get a bad reputation from these few that have reviewed the school
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 20, 2008

Skyline is a great school! We moved to the area from the east and were in one of the top school districts in our area with small class sizes and have found this school to be fantastic with a great learning culture. Our child is in the IB program which is rigorous program and is thriving in it. The school also offers top knotch athletics. Great and caring teachers. A+
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2008

It is a great school. The teachers are there to help you. There are flaws though. I think that sports play to much of a part in it. The kids are rude and cruel. They are rich and expect things to be served to them on a silver platter. I think that it is not the schools fault though, it is the parents. There are still some good kids though. There are good music programs and other things you can join. It is challenging but later you will be greatful for it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 5, 2008

Skyline High School is extremly challenging and is horrible for the average student. I would only reccomend it to students who think the average school is too easy and wants more of a challenge. The only thing I like about Skyline is the football program. Alot of the students are very rude to teachers and their other students. As a student of Skyline, I would not recomend this school to other students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 6, 2007

Much of this info is old. Skyline NOW in our exp (06 grad & a jr):SHS's had public problems in admin over past 3-4 yrs. Suffers from poor culture that must be addressed top down. It is an adversarial one, not a collaborative one. Yes there are some wonderful teachers, but it's 80/20 rule. Setting bar high is good; realistic support structures to achieve that is what's lacking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2007

I think this school is an extremely challenging and harsh environment. Many of the students are disrespectful and I don't think there are that many good teachers on staff. A lot of the kids are stressed out and not happy. Great advanced orchestra program, but lack of AP classes is definitely a huge downfall.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 16, 2006

I enjoy the vary of classes besides the lack of Art programs. Over all in a parents view Skyline is a great school but in my eyes it is not the best environment for some students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 21, 2006

As a graduate of Skyline High School, I would NOT reccomend it. The school itself is good and the teachers are fine but the students are not nice to put it lightly. The curriculm is very challenging average students do not do well. I was in the IB program which was very hard, 3+ hours of homework a night and my friends and I would often study all night long for the tests. Many of the good teachers leave because the parents can be so demanding and the students can be disrespectful.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 21, 2006

Great school, nice facilities. High faculty turnover in initial years, but has stabilized and established itself as leader in KC.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 4, 2006

Skyline High School is a very challenging school, almost too challenging. A lot of the teachers don't have good realationships with us. I've had very few good teachers that I learned a lot from. It is a horrbile atmosphere for a lot of the students. Most of the students are judgemental and cruel.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 20, 2005

Skyline is a great school. There are absolutely no safety issues and teachers are great. It is a challenging and rewarding school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
83%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

259 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
96%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

217 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
99%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
68%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

394 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

179 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
93%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
71%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students77%
Female82%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income60%
Not low income80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income85%
Not low income98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female99%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
White99%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students40%
Female36%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Low incomen/a
Not low income45%
Special education10%
Not special education59%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students90%
Female91%
Male89%
Black50%
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanic79%
Multiracial83%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income56%
Not low income91%
Special education57%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students90%
Female93%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic86%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income40%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

422 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

494 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

492 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
77%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

493 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students96%
Female98%
Male95%
Black69%
Asian99%
Asian/Pacific Islander98%
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income83%
Not low income97%
Special education77%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students97%
Female99%
Male95%
Black94%
Asian98%
Asian/Pacific Islander97%
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income97%
Special education86%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 71% 63%
Asian 20% 7%
Hispanic 5% 18%
Black 2% 5%
Two or more races 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 13%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 20%N/A8%
Special education 25%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 23N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 72%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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1122 228th Ave SE
Sammamish, WA 98075
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 837-7702

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