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GreatSchools Rating

Eastlake High School

Public | 9-12 | 1592 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted April 20, 2013

I graduated from this school about five years ago and it appears that not much has improved since I went there. I will agree that the standards are high academic wise (in a good way) and I did appreciate some of my teachers. However, what I disliked were the attitudes. Some of my teachers would openly stereotype us as "rich spoiled kids" for going to this school. Granted I'm sure some of us were, but not all. It was also obvious that some of them just didn't care. There was a huge focus on sports, basically if you weren't on a select team or had your own personal coach...you wouldn't even think of trying out for a team. There were also a lot of cliques at this school and a high focus on money and status. I still remember begging my parents to switch schools half way through my time there. I stuck with it though, and I'm happy to say I never have to go back.


Posted March 4, 2013

I've had one child graduate from here. After a job opportunity came about we moved. Our second child graduated from a school in a different state. We have an opportunity to move "home" and our third/last child could graduate from Eastlake. Without much thought my husband has moved back for work, the rest of the family is staying put until our last child graduates. Eastlake tends to concentrate too much on state and federal test scores and not on the students ability to absorb the material. If your student is one that does not have aspirations of going to a 4 year D1 or ivy league university, they don't excel in this environment. There IS too much emphasis on money, the (most) kids DO drive brand new expensive cars, and kids that do not fit the mold, are lost in the crowd. We still have great friends there and they understand and support our decision not to come back. I am looking forward to seeing them again.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2012

Don't let the rating fool you. This is a top notch school. Eastlake currently has higher test scores in every area (except slightly lower in science) than neighboring Skyline with the exception of one math score. This significantly lower score skews the rating system and is due to the fact that EHS currently has no freshmen class. That math score comes only from the students who are already a year behind in math. Once the school adds a freshmen class (this fall), that score will fall in line with other four year high schools and Eastlake's rating will be back on the top again.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2011

This school is really great if the student is willing to work hard. Many of these reviews have mentioned how difficult it is with little money, but it isn't all that bad. While most students are very privileged, the rest definitely are not looked down upon. Many people dislike it for the lack of diversity and care for one another (too haughty-taughty), but I disagree. Take it from me, students care about one another. There are many magnificent teachers. This school's weakness is its obvious priority of sports and test scores. The programs are clearly aimed towards 4-year college. Overall it is a wonderful school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 24, 2011

EHS has been overall a disappointment from an academic standpoint. We were told it was LWSD's rigorous academic school, this is our experience: * AP classes are not available until a student's junior year; honors program is non-existent. * Core classes lack substance and rigor. * Lack of leadership at the top -- Disengaged principal who is invisible to parents and students. * Lack of support for "academic" enrichment programs. Spotlight on sports, dance and cheerleading. * College prep limited - few students end up at top tier universities, become merit scholars, etc. * Teachers teach to a minimum baseline at the sophomore course level. There are a few exceptions. * Parent involvement is limited and they're kept at an arms length by the administration. Positives: Some teachers do "stretch" students and go the extra mile when it comes to their teaching strategy, communication with parents and availability to students--Particularly the Advanced Algebra teacher (Mr. Stratton), Spanish teacher (Ms. Meilleur) and Leadership/Biology teacher (Ms. Borden). All three are to be commended going above and beyond.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2011

As a previous student of this school, I enjoyed all 3 years I have spent there. The teachers were amazing and I had a great relationship with all of them. I didn't grow up with a lot of money and never felt out of place. I hate that parents think that just because it's a wealthy area, it's not a great school. It definitely prepared me for college and I felt like I received an amazing education and had great experiences. The extended core program really helped me make great friends and be close with my teachers and I loved how they incorporated all core classes with major projects. It's all about how motivated you are that reflects your success.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 10, 2008

I completely agree with some of these reviews. This school is not all it's cracked up to be. I have never seen the principal. There is too much emphasis on money. Most of the kids drive fancier more expensive cars than I will ever own. If you're kids don't have the money they can't keep up or fit in. We have been here for 20 years, our kids have never gone to school anywhere else. My Junior at Eastlake wants to move before Senior year because she's sick of the attitudes and clics. This school concentrates on students that are interested in and can afford 4 yr college, the rest get lost in the shuffle. Agree that some of the teachers are gems, I wish good karma for those. I too am disappointed with the experiences we have suffered here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2008

I am a previous student from EHS... This school was a very good school to attend. Unfortunately, I found it a little too strict and they put a lot of pressure on students. The terms for the senior project were extremely rigid. I was failing in this school because I felt I could never measure up to the teacher's and principal's ideals for students. Every student is very excepting of each other, and if they aren't at first they are by senior year. A ton of great friends made there. When I graduated from another high school I went on to attend college and am using some of the skills I learned from EHS. I also have 2 siblings that attended and graduated.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 26, 2007

Teachers: Many are gems. Some, unfortunately, judgmentally pigeon-hole students and keep them there and refuse to communicate w/parents. Principal/Administration: Awful! Principal refuses to get to know students.This school is not all that it is cracked-up to be. Rules are not enforced. We are very disappointed with our 6+ years of experiences at this school and wish we had never sent our children there. It makes a good 'show' on test scores, but schools - especially high schools - are so much more than the sum of its test scores!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2006

According to the Seattle Times School Guide, 86% of 2005 Eastlake graduates enrolled in college, so it would be safe to say that Eastlake should concentrate on college prep. The National Center for Education Statistics indicates that business and social sciences are the two most popular undergraduate fields and further shows that there has been nearly a 20% increase in students selecting business and marketing degrees since the inception of the Eastlake business program. Today Skyline and Redmond High Schools, which serve a similar demographic, have kept up with this trend, offering 2 3 times more business and marketing curriculum than Eastlake. The school is turning a deaf ear to students and parents asking for entry and AP marketing and advanced business classes to have the same competitive advantage offered in other college prep high schools. Unless they change this soon, be prepared to be frustrated and short-changed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2006

Eastlake is a wonderful school. The teachers are very passionate about what they teach and time to get to know their students. The size of the high school is wonderful as it allows the students and teachers to know each other and see each other. There are not too many students that an individual gets lost in the crowd. I loved this school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 24, 2006

Excellent high school. Nice facilities, well-maintained grounds, and fantastic faculty. Would be pleased to raise my children nearby.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 19, 2005

Pretty good high school. Some very strong teachers particular in Biology and History area. Pretty even student body with majority of students oriented towards college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 24, 2004

A wonderful school, definitely one of the best in the state. Good teachers and hardworking students make this school succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2004

Overall a good School. It could be much stronger in development of diversity of alternative learning. Seems to be strong in paticular in two sports. Academics only geared towards four year college.Needs alternative choices! Needs stronger Performing program all around. Needs stronger rules in dress codes pressed. Two much skin showing all the time on students. Teachers need to be incouraged by Principle to be around daily two hours after school is out. Availablity for students to get help is limited a lot. School has improved on team spirit. As well as incouraging out side community involement for kids.This year I saw a huge involvement and improvement of this. Socialy a hard shool for a family income below one hundred thousand a year to fit in. Kids make kids feel bad. . Very wealthy familys. School activities in Dances pushed to much on Glitz and glamour not themes and simplicity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2004

It is an awesome school. the focus on academics is superb. They PTA has always helped out in many ways. It helps support an evening preparation class for the SAT- as well as many other events. The teachers are in contact with parents daily!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2004

I think that this school teaches our children to be respectful and on top of that have a great education. Many have said it to be one of the top five in the state, however I think that its number one. My children just started at Eastlake High School last year and have found it easy to adapt to the school enviroment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2003

The extended core program is awesome and the teachers in it are the best. This school has very high expectations but also a lot of teachers offer help, so it's easy to meet and exceed the expectations.


Posted August 26, 2003

Three of my children have graduated from Eastlake, and I found it to be an excellent school. My children graduated in 96, 2000 and 2003. The staff encourage my children to succeed in life. The two older children have done very well in college and the older one has graduated and has a sucessful career in TV. I think this is partially due to the positive atmosphere at Eastlake HS.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

352 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
70%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
9%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students40%
Female41%
Male38%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Low income23%
Not low income43%
Special education12%
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students96%
Female95%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
White95%
Low income100%
Not low income95%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students38%
Female35%
Male41%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Low incomen/a
Not low income44%
Special education21%
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students88%
Female88%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian88%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial86%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income77%
Not low income89%
Special education50%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students79%
Female74%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian75%
Asian/Pacific Islander75%
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income85%
Not low income79%
Special education46%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Low incomen/a
Not low income39%
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students18%
Femalen/a
Male27%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White21%
Low incomen/a
Not low income19%
Special educationn/a
Not special education17%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

433 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

406 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
77%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

357 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students97%
Female98%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian94%
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanic85%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Low income79%
Not low income99%
Special education76%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female98%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian96%
Asian/Pacific Islander96%
Hispanic92%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income85%
Not low income96%
Special education78%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 63%
Asian 11% 7%
Hispanic 4% 18%
Black 2% 5%
Two or more races 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 14%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 20%N/A8%
Special education 29%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 70%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Music room
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Brad Malloy

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Music room
  • Swimming pool
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Badminton
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Badminton
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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400 228th NE
Sammamish, WA 98074
Website: Click here
Phone: (425) 836-6600

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