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GreatSchools Rating

Broadview-Thomson Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 51 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted November 8, 2011

My children attend this school, and I just love what it has to offer. For the little ones (first grade - 5th) Spanish and science enrichment before school, art, music, and a huge anti-bullying curriculum push, K - 8. Onsite before and after school care, and a dance program with the PNB, artist in residence, and really amazing PTA. Upper grades have too much to mention in a little review (National Junior Honor Society, Japanese--they went to Japan last summer, high school math, three computer labs, winning sports teams, I could go on). The staff are caring, smart professionals overall, and I've been incredibly satisfied with the rigor of the Spectrum classes as well as the individual attention my children receive in their instruction. Class size is 22 - 24 and the principal is on the ball and responsive. My only criticism is small: no grass play areas. But they make up for it in play structures reserved for primary and upper grades. They have a separate kindergarten play area so there is a comfortable place to go at recess when they want to get away from the "big kids." I'd come visit if I were you. It's a hidden, diverse gem! There are over 36 languages spoken there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2011

My child is finishing 2nd grade right now and has attended Broadview Thomson since Kindergarten. To sum up our feelings about BT, we are applying for a transfer to another school. I have personally sent the principal several emails about the issues my child has had throughout the year with her teacher, about bullying incidents, and about the teacher s indifference to the incidents, and have never received a response. The only time he responded to me was when I bought the school several new books for the library. I was told that he would be attending a meeting with himself and the 2nd grade Administrator, yet he failed to show up to the meeting. This level of unprofessionalism has unfortunately become more frequent in my interactions with the school. There are several standout employees and teachers, but the overall problems at the school outweigh the positive aspects. This school has a bullying and behavior problem, period, and the administration seems to be largely in denial about this.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2011

I went here for 1st through 5th grade and absolutely hated it. Once, somebody punched me for no particular reason, so I told the teacher, but she said that it was not her problem and I got in trouble for "tattling". Do not send your children to this school unless you want them to be miserable.


Posted February 3, 2011

My son is a kindergarten student at Broadview Thomson. When we started school here I was a little worried, due to the poor scores and the poor reviews online. However, I really wanted my son to be in his neighborhood school. After talking to Mr. Jessee and touring the school several times we decided to send our son to Broadview Thomson. We had a rough start, as most kindergarten kids do. Kindergarten is so much more than preschool in many ways. Now that the year is half over, It has become clear to us that our son is learning to read, to write and to do math. His progress has been noteworthy. Broadview Thomson also has a great counseling department. They make great efforts to teach the kids how to solve their disagreements in a healthy way. They work in a proactive way before disagreements come up and in a cooperative way once a disagreement has taken place. Broadview Thomson is a wonderfully diverse environment, and I feel my son is learning to appreciate different races and cultures in a way that he would not be able to do in a typical Seattle school. Overall we are very happy with this school and we will be continuing here next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2011

My 5th gr. son has been here for 2 yrs (xfer'd from Viewlands upon closing). This year I grew a strong dislike for this school. The past teachers have been unorganized, impersonal, and lacked communication. I like keeping in the loop with my child's education and such, other than conferences. This is the first year when my son has had a teacher with all of the elements- personable, creative, fun, organized. The school as a whole seems to strive for diversity & promotion of anti-bullying, but they don't seem to know the signs, as my son dealt with being picked on early in the year. The principal & counselors were completely unaware of the situation. The principal used to be VP and does not make for a good principal at all. They are also apparently low on fundage, and to many of our dismay, they are not having a 5th gr. Camp this yr! That is a pivotal event for a child! I was also informed that there won t be band (or at least adv band) next year. For these reasons, I will be transferring my son to a different school next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2010

When they don't meet Average Yearly Progress Standards, the Principal says if they had more money they would but "they don't". So how do other schools do it??? A 3rd grade boy whose parents are of limited English speaking ability is testing @ 5th grade proficiency levels - clearly not challenged in traditional 3rd grade classes so he's become a discipline problem. (He slammed my son's head into a fence post and broke his tooth among other things) They put him in Spectrum briefly but that is still below the level he needs to be challenged. He continued to be a bully so they decided "they didn't have time for that kind of disruption in Spectrum" and put him back in the regular class where many of the kids are performing below grade level and in my opinion can afford the disruption less.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2010

The only saving grace for this school are the wonderful teachers and saint of a school nurse. Since the middle school and new principal this school feels more like a juvenile detention center. Bad behavior, bullying and fighting. I don't feel my child is safe and don't feel administration will do anything to protect our children while they are there during the day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2010

My child chose this middle school program in 6th grade and has only remained thru 8th grade because his friends are still there, as a parent I have have been disappointed with the lack of programs (no foreign languages, minimal computer skills, no library books for this age group, PE is only offered part of the year) and the majority of the middle school teachers leave a lot to be desired. Administration has changed this year but we haven't seen any positive changes. Given a chance to do it over I'd go with a different school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2010

We have a 4th grader and a 2nd grader at Broadview and have been very impressed with all of their teachers so far. Principal Jessee (new this year, promoted from VP) is terrific and seems to know nearly all 800 kids by name! If you've been assigned to Broadview in the new assignment plan, you should rest easy. It's a great school that somehow doesn't get the credit it deserves. (Maybe because the outside of the building isn't so attractive.) But inside the teachers care, the kids are learning and the classrooms are happy places!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2009

We have been pleasantly surprised with out daughter's kindergarten experience. This was not our first choice school, but has ended up great. Her teacher is terrific, and I've been impressed with the writing workshop, the use of reading buddies from higher grades. A very diverse school that seems to get trying hard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2009

With 3 kids one gifted, 1 average, and 1 special needs we saw the gammet. The gifted student tested 2 grade levels beyond his actual grade, even with astronomical test scores there still wasn't room in and accelerated program or anything that remotely resembled a challenge. Additionally, the middle school option is apauling; only teaching WASL classes with electives so brief that it's not even an introduction such as 1/2 hr once a week for three months of Spanish. We moved him to another middle school and it was amazing with Japanesse offered every day along with other electives and PE! Our average student had a teacher who was really checked out but he was the lucky one! Our other child had special needs & he didn't get the agreed upon help, his teacher said that despite failing he would still advance because his IEP no help just ignore it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2009

We couldn't be happier at Broadview Thomson. In fact, we took our children out of private school to put them here. The spectrum kids in 1st grade are still together with a wonderful teacher, there just weren't enough of them in 08-09 to fill a whole class. I'm surprised there isn't a wait list for spectrum at Broadview Thomson because all 5 of the teachers in that program are amazing. It's a true hidden gem. The really nice thing is that it doesn't feel like a 'have and have not' kind of school. ALL the kids seem to be getting a great education with programs in place to serve EVERYBODY. The school is diverse in every way, but everyone is treated the equally and the kids treat each other well too. No school is perfect, but, in my mind, it's a great model of what an urban school can be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2008

As a parent of two, we've had good and bad experiences. The leadership now seems lacking but not in all areas. Teachers are hit and miss but that can be the same at any school. Great new music teacher and librarian. Great nurse and office staff. But it's a big school with K-7 and wonder how it will fit K-8 and address all grades as well as they did when it was K-5. Technology and other programs are now limited when all grades had it regularly in the past. They no longer have a Spectrum 1st grade and wonder if they'll have a Spectrum 2nd grade next year. Overall, it depends on your child and teacher. And parent involvement is critical.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2007

My son has Type 1 Diabetes, ADHD and needed to be in the Special Ed program his first two years. BT was the best choice for us as they provide a full time nurse and the best teachers that helped him through his transition to mainstream 1st grade. We're very happy with his school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2006

My 2 daughters really enjoy going to BT. They enjoy their teachers. They are also challenged in the classroom and participate actively. I really appreciate that they have an on-site day care program, which is before & after school through the community center for us working parents. They have made a lot of friends at the school too which is important. Overall, the school has been good for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 11, 2005

Our child's kindergarten teacher was absolutely fantastic. The Spectrum (gifted) also has some very strong teachers. Parental involvement is good. So far we have been very pleased with Broadview-Thomson.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2005

Superb quality of instruction. Many programs. Talented and poised principal. Very active and caring parent group, activities. Kind, loving staff, always treat kids well. Office staff knocks themselves out to welcome all and to keep the school supported to get things done well and with joy. Healthy building, Friendly staff, good library.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 13, 2005

Broadview is located in North Seattle. It has great diversity in the programs it offers. The teaching staff is friendly and knowledgeable. There is an excellent music program offered, as well as chess club, and many other extra-currcular activities. The PTA is very active at Broadview.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
47%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
63%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
62%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
32%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
20%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
44%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
40%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
45%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
47%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
46%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
57%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students66%
Female67%
Male64%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic33%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income49%
Not low income91%
Special educationn/a
Not special education71%
Limited English27%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female76%
Male76%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic67%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income63%
Not low income96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education80%
Limited English46%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students56%
Female66%
Male41%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic36%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income49%
Not low income68%
Special education20%
Not special education64%
Limited English20%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female89%
Male78%
Black88%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income80%
Not low income93%
Special education73%
Not special education88%
Limited English70%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students63%
Female70%
Male53%
Black56%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic59%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income63%
Not low income64%
Special education47%
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female85%
Male65%
Black53%
Asian85%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income71%
Not low income81%
Special education48%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female85%
Male78%
Black73%
Asian92%
Asian/Pacific Islander92%
Hispanic63%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income75%
Not low income92%
Special education68%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students72%
Female76%
Male68%
Black53%
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic53%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income62%
Not low income86%
Special education32%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female47%
Male42%
Black18%
Asian30%
Asian/Pacific Islander30%
Hispanic57%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Not low income56%
Special education23%
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female82%
Male58%
Black46%
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander60%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Not low income72%
Special education62%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female60%
Male61%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic58%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income58%
Not low income65%
Special education39%
Not special education71%
Limited English42%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female60%
Male61%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic67%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income56%
Not low income71%
Special education45%
Not special education69%
Limited English33%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students62%
Female68%
Male57%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic67%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Low income56%
Not low income77%
Special education56%
Not special education66%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students54%
Female56%
Male53%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Low income45%
Not low income73%
Special education39%
Not special education60%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female78%
Male67%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income61%
Not low income93%
Special education54%
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students71%
Female61%
Male77%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income64%
Not low income87%
Special education77%
Not special education69%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

10 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 32% 60%
Hispanic 24% 20%
Black 21% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 14% 7%
Two or more races 8% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 120%N/A8%
Special education 118%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 259%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 52%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students ELL/ESL Coordinator
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Robert Wyeth Jessee

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Volleyball
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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13052 Greenwood Av North
Seattle, WA 98133
Website: Click here
Phone: (206) 252-4080

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