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GreatSchools Rating

Cleveland High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted May 28, 2013

Bad, Bad, Bad. Don't go to this school, I go to it and there are NO AP classes in Freshmen and your sophomore year. The only available AP classes in junior year is AP Calculus, AP Chemistry, and AP Computer Science. This is my second year at this school and I can say from my observations that the male teachers are generally better then the female teachers. Your freshmen year will be great because you have really good teachers in your freshmen year but then in your sophomore year the quality of the teachers go down. I would like to note that you learn 10th grade humanities in 9th grade and you learn 8th grade humanities in 10th grade. Your last project for 10th grade humanities will be a art project where you paint. YOU DON'T LEARN LITERATURE OR ANYTHING, I HAVEN'T EVEN LEARNED ANY HISTORY IN MY HISTORY CLASS!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 22, 2012

Cleveland is not a very good school to go to if you want to have a serious education. The materials and classes offer can be interesting but the learning environment is somewhat below average. Most of the students are not hardworking and some teachers just like to give easy assignments for students to do. The expectations are low and students will freak out about their abilities once they're in college.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 21, 2011

Not the best school to go to for students who want to be challenged in class. There are no honors classes, and AP is only offered for juniors and seniors. Project-baselearnt ing, the STEM program, and extra high school credits initially draws you in, but the irresponsible and lazy students(the majority of freshman anyway) stress out the teens serious about school. For the first 3 months, most of what I learned was how to research, put info on a PowerPoint/ Prezi, and be a manager to my peers. It was very disappointing to figure out that this was basically what Cleveland was actually like(when most students aren't hardworking). Advice: Project based learning works best when students don't need to be constantly told to do their work. Transferring to a different high school next semester, A very frustrated 9th grader
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 16, 2011

A Cleveland graduate from 1953. A great school then and an outstanding school now. Good luck kids. LS CONEY


Posted May 10, 2011

Excellent, dedicated, engaging teachers. Small class sizes. Ethnically diverse student body. My son looks forward to going to school every single day. A little-known gem in SE Seattle. The PTSA is small but really cares about the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2011

First of all im a student that attended cleveland. This is a fantastic school. Split into 3 different academies. Life science, and engineering/design for, the freshman and sophomores, and the college ready academy. The freshman and sophomores each get their own laptops to use for the year. Everything is project based so students interact and work together to get things done. Students just learn better that way. All the teachers are great.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 26, 2010

Incredible school the teachers are amazing the facility is amazing I love this school it's an incredible school. I highly recommend this school you will love it & your kids will love it.


Posted July 20, 2008

Teachers pay their efforts in teaching. Students are friendly and helpful.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 15, 2007

Cleveland needs more staff for hall monitoring. Students need more writing assignments (essays and research papers) They are not being prepared for college. Those types of classes should not be offered only to achievers.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
26%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
83%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
5%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

197 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
57%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
53%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
30%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
14%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students49%
Female53%
Male46%
Black36%
Asian62%
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low income61%
Special education25%
Not special education53%
Limited English39%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students91%
Female83%
Male98%
Black83%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income91%
Not low income91%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students42%
Female38%
Male45%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low incomen/a
Special education7%
Not special education63%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students68%
Female73%
Male62%
Black45%
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic78%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income66%
Not low income74%
Special education46%
Not special education70%
Limited English64%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students83%
Female81%
Male86%
Black75%
Asian89%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low income82%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students33%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income30%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education36%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

175 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
17%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

213 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
63%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

156 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
28%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

209 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students84%
Female92%
Male74%
Black76%
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander88%
Hispanic88%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low income85%
Special education29%
Not special education90%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students84%
Female92%
Male76%
Black71%
Asian94%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low income88%
Special education35%
Not special education90%
Limited English64%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 41% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 35% 7%
Hispanic 12% 20%
White 4% 60%
Two or more races 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 116%N/A8%
Special education 114%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 275%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 75%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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5511 15 Ave South
Seattle, WA 98108
Phone: (206) 252-7800

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