Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Franklin High School

Public | 9-12 | 1302 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Sweep tile
No Purchase Necessary. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes begins at 12:00:00 AM Pacific Time (PT) on April 1, 2014 and ends at 11:59:59 on April 30, 2014 (the “Promotion Period”). Open to legal residents of the U.S. and D.C., 13 years and older. Each school that receives a new, published review will get one (1) entry into the sweepstakes, up to ten (10) entries throughout the Promotion Period. See the Official Rules for details. Sponsor: GreatSchools, 1999 Harrison St., Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612.

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

15 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 5, 2013

Franklin High School is really amazing, the teachers are really nice, and I have learned so, much here. It's not a perfect school but it's really wonderful.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 21, 2012

Franklin has been an amazing experience. I can't sit back and read all the reviews written by angry students who do not take full advantage of Franklin's opportunities and do nothing about it. As a very involved senior in FHS, I can honestly say that I have liked if not loved every second at this school. You won't find a more interesting and friendly bunch of students anywhere else in Seattle. Contrary to what other students are say, I see no cliques. The lunch room is extremely diverse and students always find a friend to call their own. i will write more..
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 21, 2012

Franklin is an excellent student. I am currently a senior at Franklin, and I love it. It is such a unique school because of the diversity of the student body, the amazing spirit that the students have, and the sense of family you feel when at the school. Many complain about freshman year and not being able to get involved, but that's just not true. Freshman have their own lunch where they are required to stay in the commons. At first I thought it was dumb, but that year "trapped" in the commons became one of the best memories about my freshman year. Our class got to bond and get to know each other really well. These bonds continue to build through all 4 years of high school. The teachers at Franklin are also really great. Sure, there is the occasional not so great teacher, but you'll find that at every school. The teachers, staff, and administration are always there to support each student really care about everyone. The education that you receive from Franklin is just like the top high schools, and every year, seniors get into some of the top colleges are always very prepared for college.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 3, 2011

I am both an alumni and a parent at Franklin. I must admit I had concerns when my son was assigned to Franklin. I did not know whether it was the same place I had loved when I attended 20 years ago. That said we have been extremely happy with the school. The students, teachers and staff have been exceptional and I truly feel that my son is getting a high quality education. He has participated in every possible activity and has had great experiences in all of them. The student body is diverse but has not seemed divided in our experiece. I am sure that there are issues as there are in every school but we have been very happy there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2010

It's true that 9th graders don't have the opportunities to join clubs and other activities. I was assign to this school by the new school district system, and I have to say this place is awful. People smoke weed all the time, there are fights every week, people are extremely rude to the teachers, kids burn trash cans in the bathroom, they even break the windows, and because of that we had cancel tolo for 4 years straight already.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 12, 2010

My son graduated from Franklin with an education that rivaled that of all the other children in the family who went to high schools outside of Seattle. Franklin continues to provide an excellent education to students from all socio-economic and ethnic/racial groups.


Posted December 3, 2009

As a citizen of Seattle, Truly there is no better school than Franklin High out of the many fine teaching instiutions within this district. Schools such as Garfield, Ballard, Rainier Beach, and Cleveland cannot even compare to the unique social experience, academic excellence, and equal diversity that Franklin High has to offer. If you are in search of a High school that will transform your child into an academic scholar and civically engaged individual, without hesistation contact the school and enroll your student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 6, 2009

as a student that attended franklin high school, i would have to say i wasn't very fond of franklin high school. there are a million cliques and you can't do much as a ninth grader (you can't even join clubs in 9th grade except for the selected few) the 9th graders are pretty much ignored! as far as the education, besides my core classes (science, language arts, and history) i didn't feel i was getting educated to my full potential, and that was even doing honors! and some teachers don't listen when you ask a question!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 17, 2008

Franklin High School has the best spirit and the students always take advantage of what this school has to offer. Franklin is the oldest school in Seattle and i never fail to mention that it is one of the most diverse and proud schools. Many programs reach out those typically not heard and many students grow to become well known leaders. Walk inside, you'll see biographies of Franklin Alumni. From Governor Locke, to Jason Terry.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2007

It's a great school to be at
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 8, 2007

This school is terrible academically. Students have a tough time even getting into the University of Washington, and very few students are motivated to learn for the sake of learning. Pluses: lots of school spirit.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 29, 2006

this school is one of the best school in the district( at least in my view of point) eventhough i only attended there for 2weeks, i still wish i never transfered out. franklin's students have a lot of energy in them and the teachers are vrey encouragable. if i have a choice i would want to transfer back to franklin and i would recommended this school to any 8th graders looking for a good school to go to.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 21, 2005

The ideals are nice, but not inforced. Do to behavioral issues found in this environment, education tends to take a back seat. I would recommend going else where.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2004

I am a grad with a sibling at Franklin. The new administration seems better. Franklin had a couple of tough years under the old administration. Many quality faculty members left. That said, Franklin is a truly unique High School. There is an energy that exists there not found in any other high school. It is far and away the most diverse school in the city and unlike its rival, Garfield, diversity is somewhat realized in upper level honors and AP classes (there is still work to be done in this area). There remains a few gems in the faculty (Dr. Mintek is superb) and teachers are generally highly committed. The conselors, despite school district scrutiny, remain the most competent and committed leaders a school can expect to have. And it shows. This years graduating class won more scholarship money than any previous. I would reccomend Franklin to any prosepective student.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 23, 2003

Though there is a new administration this year, Franklin has deteriorated into a depressing, unspirited, place for students to be. Let us hope that the new leadership will make a change, though in a school it generally doesn't happen over night.
—Submitted by a teacher


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

196 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
56%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
81%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
43%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

305 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
50%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

189 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
69%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
57%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
79%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
32%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students65%
Female67%
Male63%
Black46%
Asian84%
Asian/Pacific Islander84%
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Low income63%
Not low income74%
Special education27%
Not special education71%
Limited English70%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students56%
Female53%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asian64%
Asian/Pacific Islander64%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income32%
Not low income87%
Special educationn/a
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students88%
Female89%
Male87%
Black70%
Asian94%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White92%
Low income83%
Not low income96%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students20%
Female27%
Male15%
Black11%
Asian38%
Asian/Pacific Islander38%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income24%
Not low incomen/a
Special education9%
Not special education25%
Limited English27%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students64%
Female66%
Male63%
Black40%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income59%
Not low income76%
Special education33%
Not special education69%
Limited English27%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students76%
Female77%
Male75%
Black58%
Asian85%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income75%
Not low income79%
Special education50%
Not special education79%
Limited English75%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students42%
Female45%
Male40%
Black45%
Asian43%
Asian/Pacific Islander43%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income30%
Not low income67%
Special educationn/a
Not special education45%
Limited English31%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students11%
Femalen/a
Male0%
Asian8%
Asian/Pacific Islander8%
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low income11%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education11%
Limited English6%

Geometry

All Students57%
Female60%
Male54%
Black50%
Asian64%
Asian/Pacific Islander58%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education58%
Limited English83%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students31%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education31%
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

291 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

326 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

330 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
34%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

323 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students77%
Female86%
Male70%
Black65%
Asian81%
Asian/Pacific Islander81%
Hispanic81%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income73%
Not low income86%
Special education55%
Not special education80%
Limited English32%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students83%
Female90%
Male78%
Black76%
Asian85%
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic95%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income80%
Not low income90%
Special education79%
Not special education84%
Limited English46%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Asian 53% 7%
Black 34% 5%
Hispanic 7% 18%
White 4% 63%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Two or more races 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 167%N/A40%
Transitional bilingual 213%N/A8%
Special education 28%N/A13%
Source: 1 NCES, 2010-2011
Source: 2 WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 70%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3013 South Mt Baker Bv
Seattle, WA 98144
Phone: (206) 252-6150

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT