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GreatSchools Rating

Garfield High School

Public | 9-12 | 1652 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted January 21, 2012

Garfield is a very mixed bag. My academic experience, coming out of the APP program, and having gotten very unlucky with teachers, was abysmal. It's staggering the amount of time that was wasted in half of my classes. I had three good classes: AP US, Biology and Marine Biology. I was otherwise very disappointed, and even these classes, though they were well-taught, could have been much better. My sister, on the other hand, has been very lucky with her teachers, and has been extremely happy with Garfield, academically and otherwise. We both agree that the students are excellent, and the school has some excellent extra-curricular opportunities. The outdoors program, POST, and the music program are both highlights, though with Mr. Acox approaching retirement and the splitting of APP, I worry about the jazz band's trajectory. If you get lucky and get involved, Garfield can be a great school. Chances are good that you will be seriously disappointed by academics here - there are a shocking number of truly terrible teachers at this school. I'm giving Garfield a four because I was quite unlucky with teachers, and entered with expectations that I now see were unreasonable.


Posted October 13, 2010

It's done extremely well with the students and the community.


Posted October 13, 2010

The enviroment for learning is exceptional! It's a great community oriented school with, great programs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2010

like any other high school, garfield is not perfect, but i am filled with love for this school and i would not be the person that i am today without the experience that i had there. the sense of community and pride that you gain from going to garfield will stick with you for the rest of your life. the academics and extra-curricular programs are wonderful, especially for an large, public inner-city school. there is so much history, tradition, and diversity; it is truly unique.


Posted January 4, 2010

Garfield is an amazing place. Most of the teachers there are organized, intelligent, innovative and caring The coursework is rigorous and colleges value a GHS education. The music program and student directed activities are second to none. Athletics are very good and steadily getting better. It's a big school, but there's something for everyone here. Although he's student-centered and a wonderful student advocate, Mr. Howard don't play, so kids you had better be doing the right thing at this Great School. There are lots of tremendous opportunities at Garfield that you won't find anywhere else and although it's odd for a school this size, I don't know of any learning community with more of a family feel- that's why they sing in the Doghouse- 'Glory Hallelujah I go to Garfield High!'
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 11, 2009

For a large inner city school, Mr Howard and most of the teachers has maintained and amazingly calm, safe,academically challenging, and supportive atmosphere. It is no more clique-ish than other high schools and we have observed a good amount of positive outreach from teachers and counselors. Shout out to Mr. Miranda, Ms Casavoie, and Ms Thompson. They are the tops!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2009

Best school in town adcadenics and school pride u can't ask for more. Wonderful new building with a college feel
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2008

Garfield is a big school which offers many choices and activities for students. One of the schools many strengths is the student run clubs. They have a lot of autonomy and responsibility to make the clubs work. Classes may be good or bad but the actives are really great.There must be over 100 groups. pickchoosee
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2008

My child did not go to Washington for middle school but they did not feel left out through their years at GHS. They graduated last year, and though did not take all AP classes (which might contribute to the feeling of segregation) , he was very involved in Post, and CORE. Both programs are unique to Garfield and I highly recommend any incoming freshmen to join these programs. My son never felt segregated though he did comment that some of his peers did. He had an equal mixture of friends of all different races in all of his classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2008

Sadly, this school has not worked out for our student. If your student is very bright and has attended the AP program at Washington, I am sure it is a good fit. However, if your student is coming from another middle school, be prepared for them to feel somewhat excluded or marginalized by the more dominant AP students. Classes are large, and teachers can be impersonal and dismissive at times when communicating with parents. We have requested a transfer to Center School, hoping it will be less impersonal, more inclusive and less elitist.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2008

Garfield is a very lame school. Unless you are dorky AP kid u will hate garfield. It is not a good fit for normal kids. The administrators are mean and loud and it is extremly segregrated. Im a current freshman and is currently in the process of transfering to Ballard High
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 7, 2008

Garfield is not the best school in the city of Seattle. It lacks in all categories. It's highly accredited AP classes are dumbed down by the lack of diversity of people taking those classes. Garfield is only statisticly diverse; its student body is segregated within its hallways. Major cliques are formed and disallow students to mix and interact freely, be it clubs, activities, or sports. Garfield is most definitely not the best high school to attend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2007

Garfield is the best choice for high school in the city of Seattle. It tops all other schools in all catergories. It has the best music program, the most AP classes in Seattle, a wide variety of clubs and activities, and excellent sport programs. It's diverse student population allows you to learn everything you need to prepare for life after college as well. The other schools in Seattle don't even compare.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 30, 2006

Excellent advanced classes and teachers. Diverse school with a diverse staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2006

Garfield is a great school with plenty of opportunities to improve and expand your mind. The sports and music programs are top notch and our teachers strive to create a fun safe learning environment.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 17, 2006

the music program is one of the strongest in the area. I'm more familiar with the orchestra program, which has several orchestras. The top one is by audition only. The conductor, Marcus Tsutukawa, is excellent, also conducting the Seattle Youth Symphonies.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 18, 2005

The current principal, Ted Howard, III, is awesome. He is a former student of Garfield and really knows how to communicate with the student body.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 27, 2005

If your child is into music, science, math, or the the great outdoors, this school is hands down the best one in the city. The principal is a former student and is doing a wonderful job. Most of the teachers are top notch. Garfield has easily the best high school music program in the country among non-performing arts specialty schools. There is a very active PTSA. The building is about to be renovated.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 27, 2005

Garfield offers many programs that will help your child reach his or her goals. They have great teachers that do their best even though their resources are low. They have the most AP programs that will help your child get ready for college. They have an award winning jazz band thats the best in the nation and many clubs and sports for your child to get in to. The parents here are very supportive and do alot volunteer work to help out our teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 20, 2005

Its strengths are in the science and history programs. There is significant tracking and the school has not been the particpant that the UW hoped in recruiting unnder-represented students. The excellent African American kids go out of state to historically black colleges or to Ivies--the rest of the kids who would do just fine at Washington state colleges just aren't told or encouraged to take opportunities (or even the right classes--i.e., to get in any state 4-year college, they need the third year of math). Counselors don't have time to breathe much less actually counsel students. School does not fulfill its mandate on students with Section 504 disabilities. If you have a smart, LD/ADHD kid, prepare for a battle. Teachers aren't required to know anything about learning disabilities and they don't. Technology program is excellent. Languages have fallen by the way. English is so-so.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
33%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
82%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

148 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
78%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
14%

2011

 
 
6%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
39%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
39%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
17%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students61%
Female64%
Male59%
Black46%
Asian64%
Asian/Pacific Islander60%
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income53%
Not low income75%
Special education29%
Not special education65%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students95%
Female91%
Male100%
Black92%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income87%
Not low income99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Female87%
Male97%
Black82%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic85%
Multiracial92%
White97%
Low income85%
Not low income95%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students65%
Female70%
Male64%
Black63%
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income56%
Not low income72%
Special educationn/a
Not special education72%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students36%
Female39%
Male32%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income23%
Not low income60%
Special educationn/a
Not special education37%
Limited English0%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students64%
Female59%
Male70%
Black42%
Asian87%
Asian/Pacific Islander87%
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income59%
Not low income70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students32%
Female30%
Male33%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income31%
Not low income33%
Special educationn/a
Not special education34%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students20%
Female0%
Malen/a
Black19%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income19%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

389 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

345 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

379 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

342 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students86%
Female87%
Male86%
Black76%
Asian83%
Asian/Pacific Islander83%
Hispanic96%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income72%
Not low income95%
Special education56%
Not special education88%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students90%
Female90%
Male90%
Black80%
Asian84%
Asian/Pacific Islander84%
Hispanic100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income79%
Not low income96%
Special education69%
Not special education91%
Limited English32%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 38% 60%
Black 30% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 22% 7%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 16%N/A8%
Special education 17%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 239%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 22N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 11N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 63%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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400 23 Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: (206) 252-2270

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