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GreatSchools Rating

Hay Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 529 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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66 reviews of this school


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Posted April 28, 2010

Super caring and friendly staff, fantastic teachers and a VERY involved parent community make Hay an environmnet in which kids thrive socially and academically. We are so lucky to have this school in our neighborhood. Our son just loves going to Kindergarten there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

What a great combination of strong academics, supportive teachers, and an exceptional community of parents and families!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

The incredible, dedicated teachers; the amazing, friendly staff; and the committed parent community combine to make this a truly exceptional school. My children are getting an excellent education and a wonderful community---we are so lucky!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

It is a safe environment with caring teachers and numerous additional programs to supplement the outstanding curriculum.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2010

'It takes a community' and that is exactly what we are!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 28, 2010

Excellent teachers, strong parent involvement, dedicated leaders, community pride
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 27, 2009

I can imagine a better introduction to a lifetime of learning. This school is outstanding! We had the most loving, creative and experienced kindergarten teacher, great interactions with the principal, and we made tons of new friends this past year. If you are lucky enough to get a spot in this school, you'll soon see what I'm talking about. John Hay is one big family and completely kid-centric! There's no other place I'd rather send my children. Yes, there's a parent volunteer in just about every classroom at any given time. Parents raise oodles of money to support tutors and Spanish. The community involvement, support and fund-raising are unbelievable. The teachers are warm and patient and smart. I just can't say enough. I whole-heartedly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2009

This school is a gem in a school district wrought with issue and poor leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2008

My daughter is getting a great education. The community is wonderful and the after school care is very much an extended family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2008

I'm a John Hay parent, and my son had an awful teacher his first year at the school. However, she is now gone and the last two years have been wonderful. The principal is excellent and remembers children by name. My son has had two great teachers and loves learning and going to class. John Hay is in a wealthy neighborhood, and I'm not a wealthy parent, but I am grateful for the many parents that are able to volunteer in the class and at the school in general. My son is getting an excellent education and is a very happy kid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2008

We are a former family of John Hay and miss everything about it. We knew and valued the time we had there (3 years) but it took a move across the country and a new school to make you truly appreciate what we had - from the excellent calibre of the teachers, to the administration staff, to the student body and their families as well as the various opportunities to get involved and the feeling of welcome everytime you stepped in the doors. JH will always hold a special place in our hearts and we are envious of anyone who gets to be a part of the JH community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 25, 2008

I am a single-mom of 2. I work full-time. I am not wealthy - at least, not financially. I have neither witnessed - nor been the recipient of - bias based on family or income situation. I am a seasoned volunteer - be it lunchroom duty every week, carrying out a classroom auction art project or basket, administrating auction data, or co-chairing the auction event. Confession: I tire of hearing people complain that they can't volunteer because they work full-time and/or are single-parents and/or they don't think they 'fit in'. If you want to be involved - there is a place for you. It may not be glamorous or exciting or exactly what you had in mind, but if you've got the will, Hay's got the way. On a separate note: Each of my daughter's teachers has been on top of her educational progress and has referred her for additional help as necessary. Thank you, Hay friends!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2008

Hay is a good school, with good parent involvement and solid leadership. It is in a wealthy neighborhood and it does seem that some of the at-home mothers have more of a 'say' in the classrooms because they are able to volunteer. I'm glad they do offer their time, because my daughter benefits.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2007

It's no secret why this school does well. When you combine parents that care about and are involved in their kid's education with with a Principal whose focus is on education(reading,writing,math and science) and teachers that love to teach, you get one of the best K-5s in the state. I realize that the volunteers allow the teachers to focus on teaching and that benefits our kids. Perhaps, poke your head in a classroom to see what goes on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2007

With 2 children we have been involved at John Hay for the past 6 years-- through changes in leadership, our extremely full-time jobs and so have a wide range of experience. We haven't found that financial means or stay-at-home status (now a part-time option) are significant determinants. Many families do already know each other prior & I suspect this may be the genesis of the clique comments. We didn't have that benefit & with work, I do think it took longer to get to know people. That said, the commitment and value placed upon every child at John Hay is incredible & forms a ready common ground. We've been able to find ways to be active in our children's classrooms despite our hectic work and family schedules-- opportunities do exist afterhours & outside the school. I heartily second the comments about the wonderful teachers and the consistently strong, responsive leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2007

I have been attending John Hay for 2years now and as a single mom who works fulltime. I totally agree that the school is very cliquish and hard to make friends. The parents who are lucky to enough to stay home with their children do tend to look down on working parents. The teachers here are wonderful and do care about the students, that is the real reason that I stay here. The teachers here are first rate and really make a difference with the children. That is reason enough to stay here at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 7, 2007

We have been attending John Hay for over 5 years with 2 kids. Overall it's been an excellent school. Unfortunately, the leadership is not what it used to be and that is of great concern to myself and many others. I have to agree with the other 2 posters that described the school as cliquish and reiterate the fact that the high profile, well-to-do people tend to get what they what. I am a stay-at-home mom and I donate many, many hours of time each year to the school in the form of heading up auction projects and other relatively low profile activities. You cannot go wrong at this school from K-3rd, however, and the teachers in those grades are top notch.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2007

I do agree with the previous poster. I'm not a single parent, but my husband and I both work full time and more of the other mothers in my daughters class are at home mothers. There is a challenge to keep up with the costs and sometimes we feel second rate because we cannot volunteer or give money. It is a good school in a very good neighborhood.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2006

This is one of the better schools in Seattle, but only because parents put tons of money and effort into it. However, it does have its down sides. It is very cliquish and there is a lot of monetary favortism going on. Parents can basically choose their childs path in school based on how much money they donate. The parents are all very cold if you are not from the 'Hill' or if you are a single parent, forget about blending in. Luckily, the kids don't take after their parents. If you can put up with this, your child will get a good education. Take them somewhere else for fairness and diversity. Funny, how all the positive feedback seem to be from board members of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2005

Great academics, strong parental involvement. I hope more encouragement and opportunities will be made available to all students of every academic level who may attend the school.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
87%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students90%
Female88%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income62%
Not low income95%
Special education83%
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female92%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income62%
Not low income94%
Special education92%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female81%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Not low income84%
Special education54%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female93%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Asian/Pacific Islander93%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Special education92%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students90%
Female93%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low incomen/a
Not low income92%
Special education77%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students88%
Female92%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income73%
Not low income91%
Special education80%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female92%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income82%
Not low income95%
Special education90%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female95%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income82%
Not low income95%
Special education100%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 7%
Hispanic 9% 20%
Two or more races 9% 6%
Black 3% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 111%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 212%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 16N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 55%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


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201 Garfield St
Seattle, WA 98109
Website: Click here
Phone: (206) 252-2100

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