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GreatSchools Rating

Mcclure Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 145 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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44 reviews of this school


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Posted January 19, 2009

We have a daughter in her last year at McClure, and a son who will be in 6th grade at this school next year. Our daughter has had a very good experience at McClure and has benefited tremendously from the variety of students that attend there. We have always felt that she is in a safe and secure environment. We also believe that she has progressed very well from a social and academic standpoint. She is very ready high school. The vast majority of the staff seem very enthusiastic, sincere, and engaging. The new principal, Sarah Pritchett has really stepped up to the challenge and displays a great deal of energy. I have witnessed Sarah as she deals with the various students and she exhibits a natural ability to relate to the youth, and also displays a sensitivity to the differences between the various levels/grades of the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2009

We love McClure. We were at first skeptical of the school and had heard negative reviews. We decided after meeting the new principal and the rest of the McClure team, we would give it a try. We can see the changes and improvements being made, and the community/parents are helping to do this. Our son comes home everyday saying what a great day it was at school. I am glad we made the choice to support our neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2009

The teachers are dedicated, the student body is racially and economically diverse and there seems to be burgeoning support from the parents. I'd say McClure is a rising star. We've been pleasantly surprised with the experience of our 6th grader this year. Sure middle schools have their problems, but the leadership here -- especially the new principal and vice principal -- is taking care of business. We think McClure is only going to get better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2009

We had heard negative comments about McClure, but none were from people who were connected with the school. They were from parents of other schools, who typically would say, 'Oh, I heard that McClure is (such and such...)' The positive comments were not only from the teachers themselves, but from external organizations that worked with the school -- and that spoke volumes to us. We were happy to find the educators committed, engaging and enthusiastic about teaching. It isn't without its problems. Low parental involvement and funding keep it from becoming the top-notch school it could easily become like its neighboring grade schools. But, the good news is there's strong momentum going forward and we're proud to be part of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2009

This is my daughter's third year at McClure. I will have a sixth grader next year. I have found many of the teachers to be exceptional esp. Language Arts/Social Studies. Teachers and counselors are great communicators and seem to genuinally care about my daughter despite her cranky, teen-age attitide. This is the librarian's ( Ms. Gale) third year. She is fabulous and has transformed the library to become truly the heart of the school. We have met kids from all over the city and the world. The school is small so staff really know the kids. A small army of parents, staff and kids have rejuvenated the school with paint and lots of elbow grease! The principle is involved and comitted. I urge people to give McClure a chance. It breaks my heart that people who live in QA/Magnolia don't sent their kids there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2009

This is our second year at McClure. Our first year was good, but this year seems to have great energy and a wonderful momentum. My child has thrived at this school and thoroughly enjoys going to school. Communications from the teachers has been good (I appreciate how they respond to my emails quickly). The PTSA seems strong and energetic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2009

Fabulous school for any arts-minded students. Great diversity in a small inner-city school. My daughter came from an elementary school where she was falling through the cracks and now she is full of confidence, attaining higher grades and learning to make better choices. She loves McClure!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2009

We were against this school. It was really our last choice. However, after deciding that staying in the neighborhood and supporting this school would be a great option for our child, we decided to go for it! Our son loves going to school and it is not very different from elementary school because there are so many neighborhood kids enrolled there. There is a good representation of Hay and Coe graduates, as well as surrounding neighborhoods. The 6th grade transition has been so smooth because there is not much to transition into. He gets to walk to school and see friends from elementary school and make new ones from other schools. The principal has definetely been a force in getting the students, parents and community involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2009

McClure middle school, is a horrible school, the staff do not help my child when he needs it i always either have to call or personally ask. My child was doing very well in elementary school A's and B's since going to McClure it seems his want for knowledge has dropped dramatically. I would never recommend this school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2009

Do not send your child to McClure. My daughter has been attending since sixth grade, and the school has only worsened over the years. She is in eighth grade and many of the teachers are sub-par at best. The new principal is very dissapointing, trying in vain to place 'positive discipline' into the school. The only difference is that there is no longer a reward system in place. Also, they are intoducing a new form of discipline known as 'speeding tickets' where kids get detention if they are caught rushing to class. Normally this makes sense, but the eighth graders have to go from one end of the building, grab their stuff, WALK up a staircase and cross the whole length of the building again to get to class-in 5 minutes. Lastly, this school looks like a prison-from the cottage cheese columns to the mystery meat lunch and unfriendly staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2008

McClure is disappointing. Currently, we can't find few parents from local elementary schools who want their kids to attend. The principal is green and has difficulty relating to parents. The kids are are fairly normal middle schoolers: a bit out of control and rebelling against a system of uneven punishment that the superintendent and school board promotes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2008

My daughter is a 6th grader at McClure. We did not sign-up for the school and were nervous about going there. We heard bad things about the Math/Science teacher. When school started we found out that teacher is no longer there and was replaced by a great teacher who is now my daughter's favorite. At such a critical juncture for girls in Math and Science we are so pleased that she is having a positive experience. Additionally, the teachers seem to work together so there is a cooperative feeling. The school is much smaller than many other middle schools in the area. At my son's 6th grade conferences at Washington Middle School were given 5 minutes with each teacher after waiting in a long line. At McClure we had the opportunity to have a 20-minute conference with both her LA/History teacher and Math/Science teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2008

I'm a student at mcclure middle school and I think this school is a really great school and also a really challenging school as well. I'm an honors student and enjoy being here. This school I think from my point of view will help any student that goes here become successful in their future.GO MAVERICKS!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 26, 2007

My child has done very well this year being in honors. The new principle is excellent and is working quickly and hard to change the perception of this school. It is diverse, small and operates like a microcosim of the world. The learning is excellent and not at all sheltered like other schools. The effort is up to the child and families. Seeing the kids here learn and develop has been very rewarding. They are not fueled by money or fortune but great hearts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2007

I like McClure a lot, and I am getting challenged enough and the teachers are very good. I think that some teachers and substitutes could discipline children a little bit better and more, especially when it comes to referrals, I think teachers just keep giving 'warning' but never really do anything drastic. Overall, though, I really like it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 17, 2007

If I had known what I know now about McClure, I would never have sent my child there. My child is in the 8th grade, and there are numerous kids who are disciplinary problems in the classroom and hallways. So far she's learned lots of new words, none of which are repeatable in respectable society. The school fails to deal with problem children, who take up much of classroom time, and bully others. Discipline is extremely lax, nearly nonexistent. Academically, my child has gotten further behind since going to McClure, and has lost motivation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2007

I am a student at mcclure and I think it is ok... I feel I am relearning things. It is very annoying. I would like to be in honors, but it is full. I turned in a packet so that I would be able to at least have harder work, but that never happened. My teacher never took care of that. It can be annoying.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 9, 2007

If your kid needs to dampen their motivation and gain an appreciation for the darker side of humanity, this is your school. McClure is lack luster at best and frightening at its worst. A couple of the teachers are excellent, and the rest seem to have a motivation on par with their out of control students. Actually, the school has a pretty good representation of troubled kids of every creed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2006

How impressed I was at curriculum night. The Acting principal (can we keep her) is a leader with excellent communication skills and a savvy use of the in-house technology. 7th and 8th grade special ed kids are integrated with mainstreamed kids in LA/SS and Math/Science. With the addition of their resource room teacher in these 4 periods, the kids have a fighting chance to thrive and grow as learners. The positive discipline model is excellent and indeed is teaching life-skills at a time when hormones tend to overtake common sense. How refreshing. This is the school that I picked. So, what a difference true leadership makes...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2006

Our experience with McClure has been rather inconsistent. Several teachers have been stellar (6th grade especially), while our 7th grade experience was definitely disappointing, due to the core teachers my child had. 8th grade is looking promising. Compared to our experience in the elementary school our child attended, the teachers seem less happy and the academic standards seem lower. Our child's scores on standardized tests have dropped while at McClure. I can't say whether that is McClure's fault or hormones, but my child has become much less motivated to achieve since at McClure. The after school programs have been great for our child, due to the Seattle City Parks & Recreation Grant. I would describe the parent involvement as excellent. I have not experienced the parent volunteers as exclusionary at all, but there are certain parents who seem to be involved in everything (bless them!).
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

164 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

137 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students71%
Female72%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic43%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income39%
Not low income78%
Special education24%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female90%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income58%
Not low income95%
Special education52%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students76%
Female79%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander60%
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income47%
Not low income86%
Special education29%
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female85%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian50%
Asian/Pacific Islander50%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income56%
Not low income87%
Special education29%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students84%
Female93%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income60%
Not low income92%
Special education41%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female66%
Male61%
Black19%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic47%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income41%
Not low income72%
Special education13%
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female81%
Male72%
Black44%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income54%
Not low income84%
Special education35%
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students72%
Female72%
Male71%
Black35%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic47%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income37%
Not low income84%
Special education22%
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income91%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 57% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 15% 7%
Black 12% 5%
Hispanic 10% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 110%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 231%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 48%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Performing and written arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sarah Pritchett

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1915 1 Av West
Seattle, WA 98119
Phone: (206) 252-1900

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