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GreatSchools Rating

Mcclure Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 145 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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42 reviews of this school


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Posted Sunday, July 20, 2014

McClure just completed its 4th year as a neighborhood school and is a great place to send your kids. The parents, staff, school district and local business community have really stepped up and are supporting McClure students more than ever before. Financial support has increased dramatically - helping fund all new students computers and many other student and classroom needs. The student leadership program is the best in the district, the library and librarian are top notch, focus on science, math, language arts, video production, choir, band, orchestra, and exploratory classes just gets better and better. Many more parents are volunteering than ever before, jumping right in starting in 6th grade, no longer "waiting" but stepping right up and joining our committed, growing community focused on building the best little middle school in the district. A couple 7th grade teachers may be (past) due for retirement, but overall the staff is outstanding and focused on educational excellence and encouraging kind, thoughtful behavior and learning in and outside the classrooms. The new principal is an outstanding communicator and absolutely focused on improving academics & community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2014

McClure is definitely a school of contrasts. My 7th grader is very smart, sensitive, and doesn't have any behavioral issues. He prefers to be a teachers assistant when he can. I trust his reports to me about significant numbers of students in his classes who don't care about learning or rules and who act out every day in ways I can't even imagine being tolerated. The teachers, while well meaning and dedicated, seem to have no tools at their disposal to cope with these ridiculous behavioral issues. This suggests to me that they either lack the training or commitment from the administration or both. I am not sure which it is. I myself am an educator and have an advanced degree and I am appalled at the low level of instruction he receives. They seem to be stuck on simple topics for weeks and with classes often being disrupted by the behaviorally challenged students, I have seen little substantive learning take place. I worry that he will have difficulties when he goes to high school (unless the high school is just as challenged). The teachers seem to hold back, designing their instructional choices to lowest level in the class instead of seeking high achievement. Very disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2014

I am an eighth grade student at McClure, and I can say that the past three years have been awful, I am a disruptive student in general, but that is only due to the fact that in the classroom the teachers have no power, or don't care. The only reason I wanted to go to McClure is because of all my friends, and next year I am going to ballard and I am worried that I will fail AP classes because of the learning at McClure.


Posted April 27, 2013

The review below mine is contradictory stating that "student behavior issues...are profound and inumerous [sic]" and that "kids are mostly well-behaved". Which is it? I believe this reviewer's grammar and spelling speaks volumes. McClure, Seattle's smallest middle school, is excellent and the best school at which I've taught. Students receive more attention than those at larger middle schools, some of which house nearly a thousand students. Teachers know their student and families. The PTA is very active and helpful, raising tens of thousands of dollars to support student learning. McClure uses first-rate curriculum with fidelity. Language arts classes use reading and writing workshop, a highly effective curriculum that promotes authentic literacy. Math, science, and social studies also have strong curriculum. Dedicated teachers work together closely to help students. These are the most polite, respectful, and talented students with whom I've ever worked. Many produce high-school-level writing. When behavior issues arise, which is inevitable in any middle school, administration responds quickly and appropriately. If I had children, they would attend McClure Middle School.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 6, 2013

Yes, the school sits in a wealthy neighborhood, but that doesn't mean that the school is necesarily successful. This school is run poorly, and has a Principal & Counseling/Student Discipline staff that are not proficient in curbing student behavior issues--which are profound and inumerous!. As a substitute-teacher, I have worked all Seattle Schools. Take my word for it, don't send your child to this one. Some great teachers, but dealing w/the admin. will only give you and child headaches and a distasteful experience. School has great potential--kids are mostly well-behaved, but until admin. is removed, no progress can be made!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 25, 2013

My son has gone to McClure for two years and is currently in 7th Grade. I agree with a previous poster who thought that there were some really good teachers intermixed with alot of mediocre teachers. I'm not sure if it's burnout, or inadequate teaching/organization skills, but some of these teachers are very frustrating! My son turns in papers to several of his teachers who then can't find the assignments! It's not ALL his teachers, it's the same two. It is really frustrating. My son doesn't really complain; he just mentions how confusing and disorganized some of his teachers are. My personal standard is, if something isn't working, change the way you do it! It just seems it is easier to blame the students and not admit their system may not be working. On a positive, the new language arts teacher ROCKS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

I am currently a student at McClure and I love it. The school is really small (approximately 450 kids total) which allows everyone to know everyone. They are extremely disorganized though, class sizes are uneven, at the beginning of the 2012-2013 year, one algebra class had 48 kids while another had only 18 kids; at least 75% of the students received schedules that had a missing class period and two of the same class. Counselors and office staff are very unresponsive and none of the staff have the same views on ANYTHING. Some teachers are downright horrible, parents and students signed a petition to get her kicked out but nothing happened & technology is very slow. Otherwise, the school is friendly and had lots of nice art and sport programs and programs for advanced learning.


Posted September 1, 2012

Our child goes to McClure and likes the school. There are some excellent teachers there who are enthusiastic about their subjects, who take an interest in each child and do a great job. Some teachers are better than others; the quality of the experience for each class really depends on how good the teacher is, and how much he or she cares. The math and english teachers have been especially good. The principal's doing a good job and we've had good experiences whenever we've spoken with her about our child. It's a fine neighborhood school and we've been pleased with the whole experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2012

McClure is a mediocre school in a great neighborhood. It has been "up and coming" for over 10 years, but never gets any better. The problem is the leadership, particularly the principal. The principal has no leadership and blames every problem on somebody else, and does little to improve the school. Class sizes are huge and very unevenly distributed. excuse: district didn't fund us. (It's funded exactly like every other school in Seattle, and sits in a neighborhood which richly supports ALL the other schools.) Discipline is terrible and incredibly inequitable. Large class sizes make that worse. Bullying is rampant, as are suspensions. excuse: We have to do it that way. Teacher turn over is tremendous, it lost nearly half it's teachers last year. excuse: Teachers are bad. Really? Even the ones hired by the principal? Arts have been all but eliminated in favor of things like computer literacy. Many teachers are actually very good. There are also quite a few duds. In some classes kids do next to nothing at all, even in core subjects. But the teacher turnover isn't getting rid of the weak teachers, it simply is churning through good ones leaving instability behind.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2011

Everyone knows that teachers need smaller classes and more time with students but McClure really shows it, in the 2011-2012 school year they only had 1 teacher of each core class for each grade. While the majority of the teachers are very good at what they do, they lack the time and energy to do it. The schools bullying policy is atrocious with problems going unnoticed unless someone reports it to the councilors, and even then very little is likely to be done.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 16, 2011

There were some excellent teachers at McClure and some frankly atrocious teachers. Most teachers seemed overwhelmed with their workload and seemed to view parent communications as an inconvenience. The biggest problem with Mc Clure is the lack of leadership on the part of the Principal. Bullying was a big problem. Large problems were ignored and there was an overreaction to small conflicts between students. Overall if we could do it again we would not have sent our student to McClure. Hopefully they will get their act together, the community is counting on it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2011

There are many teachers at McClure who are just wonderful! (Though a few who are OK) The music program is excellent with a very good teacher. For transitoning the new 6th graders they have a very good program called WEB (where everybody belongs). It teaches the kids many new skills, getting comfortable with the school, and the 8th grade WEB leaders become their first middle school buddies.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2011

Our family attended the open house event on March 24, 2011. We live on Queen Anne and have a 4th grader at John Hay School so we were learning about and touring McClure School for the first time. Overall the school seemed just OK and I worry about 3 mediocre years there. The competent and engaging Language Arts teacher was the highlight. The Science teacher was enthusiastic and hands-on. The other teachers we saw were just OK. The principal's response to a parent's question about PTA involvement and fund-raising was disappointing because she seemed to be saying that students don't really want their parents to be involved much any more (sigh..this may be true), and beyond purchasing a some specific equipment items (her example was music stands), the school was doing alright and she understands how growing teens will consume more of a family's funds. I wonder if she realizes that Hay & Coe parents tend to have the time, funds and interest to make their child's public school the best it can be. This is a huge opportunity for community relationship building with the QA neighborhood, as well as improving the vibe and atmosphere of the school. Hopefully she'll think big!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

I agree the school does little to communicate what needs to be done. Especially for 6th graders that are transitioning. Some of the teachers are even mean. I do not recommend this school. They actually suggested that my young daughter take the Metro bus alone. I am appalled. I will try to get my child in private school next year. She was at the top of her class last year and this year is just awful so far.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

The grade 6 class entering this school for 2011 is amazing. I just see tons of parent evolvement that is going to enable change and improvements especially with the new school plan in place. McClure is a queen anne school very local and convenient, safe surroundings. We met with the Math teacher and are very impressed. Our kid is doing excellent in math and I am not at all worried about the level of education he can achieve at McClure. See you all next year!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

I keep hearing really great things about McClure and am so excited about how many of my son s friends from Coe will be attending next year. The level of parent involvement at Coe elementary is outstanding, and with so many students from Coe s 5th grade class attending McClure next year, the school can only get better. The open house for incoming 6th graders was very informative and I was really impressed by the principal and all of the teachers I met. My neighbor s son is an 8th grader at McClure and she s very happy with their ability to provide academic challenge to her son whose IQ is off the charts. I m looking forward to seeing even more positive changes in this school and am glad my son will be a part of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2010

The school gets a disproportionate number of students who travel from the Central District and thus gets proportionately less parental involvement from those parents because of distance and transportation issues. The school can use all the support it can get.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2009

I am a student at BHS currently and had my last year at McClure Last year. Coming from John Hay the transition was quick easy and painless i met great people and had great grades. But after reading through all of these reviews im a little appalled and actually laughing at alot of the bad review, McClure (as with all middle schools) is what you make of it. People are bussed in all throughout the city making it amazingly diverse and multicultural. In my graduating class from this school i do not know one person who actually tried to get good grades who didn't get the grades. The teachers are amazing i had a great experience being a t.a. for a year for the autism teacher (great program look into it!). Ms.Pritchett Is Fabulous and all of the other administrators are too! Don't listen to the bad rep this school gets!
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 19, 2009

We have a daughter in her last year at McClure, and a son who will be in 6th grade at this school next year. Our daughter has had a very good experience at McClure and has benefited tremendously from the variety of students that attend there. We have always felt that she is in a safe and secure environment. We also believe that she has progressed very well from a social and academic standpoint. She is very ready high school. The vast majority of the staff seem very enthusiastic, sincere, and engaging. The new principal, Sarah Pritchett has really stepped up to the challenge and displays a great deal of energy. I have witnessed Sarah as she deals with the various students and she exhibits a natural ability to relate to the youth, and also displays a sensitivity to the differences between the various levels/grades of the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2009

We love McClure. We were at first skeptical of the school and had heard negative reviews. We decided after meeting the new principal and the rest of the McClure team, we would give it a try. We can see the changes and improvements being made, and the community/parents are helping to do this. Our son comes home everyday saying what a great day it was at school. I am glad we made the choice to support our neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

164 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

137 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students71%
Female72%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic43%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income39%
Not low income78%
Special education24%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female90%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic71%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income58%
Not low income95%
Special education52%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students76%
Female79%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian60%
Asian/Pacific Islander60%
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income47%
Not low income86%
Special education29%
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female85%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian50%
Asian/Pacific Islander50%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income56%
Not low income87%
Special education29%
Not special education86%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students84%
Female93%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian80%
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanic79%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income60%
Not low income92%
Special education41%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female66%
Male61%
Black19%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic47%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income41%
Not low income72%
Special education13%
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female81%
Male72%
Black44%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income54%
Not low income84%
Special education35%
Not special education84%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students72%
Female72%
Male71%
Black35%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander82%
Hispanic47%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income37%
Not low income84%
Special education22%
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income91%
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 57% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 15% 7%
Black 12% 5%
Hispanic 10% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 110%N/A8%
Special education 112%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 231%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 19N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 9N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 48%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Performing and written arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sarah Pritchett

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1915 1 Av West
Seattle, WA 98119
Phone: (206) 252-1900

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