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GreatSchools Rating

Nathan Hale High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted August 22, 2013

I personally like this school. I'm currently coming back as a junior, and my experience as a sophomore was quite exceptional. I wasn't pleased with the freshman that year, too many annoying freshmen cliques. I sincerely hope that the incoming freshmen this school year are gonna be at least a bit better than the freshmen last school year, but hearing that most kids are coming from Eckstein, I highly doubt any improvement is gonna happen. I agree there are at least a handful of students suffer from marijuana use but I know for sure that half of them have quit their habits. So drug use won't be a huge issue. Most of the teachers know what their doing and are familiar in their field. My freshman history teacher, Teacher Ted, being a Harvard grad and all, is AMAZING at his field. As a former student of his, I found his class quite challenging, and I love it. There are a ton of other teachers who are quite similar to him, as well. The counseling is superb as well. I know kids who suffered depression and got help from the counselors and the school nurse, and the outcome was incredible. They are now more positive and joyful. Hale is an amazing school, despite the annoying freshies.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 21, 2013

My daughter finished her freshman year at Hale this spring, and our entire family was pleasantly surprised by the school s quality. Because Hale doesn't have the academic reputation as its neighbor a few miles south, we were concerned our APP-qualified daughter wouldn't be challenged enough; but in talking with friends whose kids attend the "other" school as well as other parents at Hale, we feel the culture and curriculum at Hale were probably MORE challenging and stimulating (critical thinking is emphasized and interdisciplinary work is commonplace). We have heard graduates laud Hale for its ability to prepare students for college, and we now understand why this might be the case. Our daughter did have a couple of marginal teachers, but the rest were good to excellent, and the marginal ones were receptive to feedback. Beyond academics, we LOVE that Hale faculty and administration work hard to develop a culture of respect and appreciation for differences. Sure, some cliquishness remains, but it seems to be less than at other schools. On most days my daughter comes home excited about school and life, and she has even reported being proud of [her] school multiple times.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2013

Nathan Hale is a reflection of its staff. For the most part, they are caring, involved and really seem to have the best interests of individual students in their hearts. The student body is diverse. I was hoping my daughter would learn about other cultures from the Somalis, Kenyans, Germans, Tajikastanians, etc. and understand different points of views. But she ignored my advise and made great friends, ignoring skin color, race, country of origin, and political views. The principal, sets a supportive, friendly, but no nonsense tone. She has a great sense of humor and eyes on the back of her head. Creative, organized and smart, Spanish Teacher, MM will get even my language-challenged child to speak, sing and/or act in Espanol. Coach CS will have your slug of an offspring running a couple of miles every day and loving it. Ms. R Algebra 2, created real-life-example worksheets with my daughters name subtly included. Mr E Physics, a great teacher of lifetime learning, not only takes inner city kids to tide pools on the Peninsula, but also heads the robotics team. Improvements? School District in a more supportive role. Not policing or money pit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2013

I went to this school for four years. I was there before and after the remodel and I can honestly say I am a very successful student because of it. I am currently a sophomore at a top rated college and I have been getting A's in all of my classes. The thing about Nathan Hale is that it prepares you for life, not just academics. It might not exceed state standards but it teaches students how to become adults. I haven't had t go home to see my parents in two years because I matured so much in high school. I believe Nathan Hale had a say in that. I have a great relationship with my family but I am out in the world and not a child anymore. Hale taught me that. If you want amazing academics, you will forfeit life learning opportunities.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 15, 2010

Great school its the best out there. don't waste your time on other schools. i switched my son out of shoreline school district; Shorewood just to see how he would do and he has done the best job ever! Shorewood wasn't very divers and didn't care much about African American kids . Now at hale he has scholarships coming in. this school really tends to African American kids. I made a switch and my son and i love Hale! I had second thoughts about it because my oldest son didnt do so well there. But the new principal is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2010

This school is great, I recomend the new Mock Trial club that has just started it is loads of fun.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 14, 2010

This is the best school. I love it, the teachers are great and fun. I live in ballard and i made the decision to commute everyday and i have never regreted my decison.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 18, 2009

My child started at Hale this year. Our observations are that the teachers are better than average in quality. The (new) principal Jill Hudson is outstanding. Test scores are high. Academics are rigorous. There are some issues though: some racial tension, more than average amount of students with behavior problems (IMO), no separate honors classes, only a handful of AP classes, and rampant marijuana use. Not sure if this is typical of all urban high schools or unique to this school? Overall though, a great school. Teachers know every student well. Tons of parent volunteers and fundraising. We are pleased thus far.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2009

Nathan Hale is a great school. With it's diverse student population, great staff and helpful parent base I couldn't want my kids going anywhere else. My daughter graduated with the class of 2009 and my son has just started his freshman year there. There is a wide range of sports and extracurricular activities and clubs that all of the student body is encouraged to participate in. With a later start time than other high schools in the area, the students are able to get the needed extra sleep/study time needed to be successful scholars. The school is undergoing a big remodel/renovation upgrade project now, to be completed in 2011 and the students have been very cooperative and understanding while the project is underway. The new state of the art radio station, art studio, photography, library and some of the gym classes have been completed with more great new spaces for learning to come. We look forward to the future of our school and all that it has to offer us. Go Nathan Hale!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 11, 2009

Nathan Hale is an interdisiplinary school. It combines subjects to look at social, historical and scientific issues from many angles. It is a school that encourages a community that cares and encourages all students from the top to the bottom of the academic spectrum to reach their own individual best while participating in a school community that is cohesive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2009

I have a senior and sophomore at Nathan Hale. It's been a great school for both of them--it's like a private school with no tuiton. The staff is dedicated & collaborative, the curriculum is progressive & solid, there are lots of sports & clubs, parent involvement is welcome. It's big enough to allow lots of options but small enough so kids don't get lost.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2009

I am currently a Junior at Nathan Hale, and I LOVE it! For the most part, the teacher's are amazing, and they're very easy to talk to. At Hale we have almost every type of club possible, and I find that for the most part, Hale isn't a clicky school. The students there are pretty openminded, and there is a wide variety of classes.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 1, 2007

Our son graduated last year from Hale. He was happy there but as parents, we weren't. Great mentorship program, great radio station, good to great counselors (Jeff Jones is top-notch).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2006

Great commitment of staff to student learning, focused on diversity and critical thinking.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 10, 2006

What impresses me the most is the school spirit among the students and the friendliness. Upper classmen don't hold it over lower classmen. Easy atmosphere has made my freshmans' first year fairly stress free. Math is a problem as the program is poor, as it is across the state.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2005

This has been the best school I have gone to. I have been to many bad schoosl where there are fights and no control over the students. Nathan Hale has been the first school where I have seen harmony betwwen the students and very excellent teachers.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 19, 2005

An all in all average school. Academic programms meet all state standards but do not exceed them. Sports is a very important subject for students.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 6, 2005

The teachers and the support staff are all excellant and dedicated. They really care about the kids and are devoted to developing the best educational program possible. They have fantastic music, drama and sports programs. Parents are extremely involved in the PTSA. This school comes highly recommended.
—Submitted by a staff


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
36%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

244 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
76%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

119 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
79%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
50%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students78%
Female73%
Male81%
Black56%
Asian91%
Asian/Pacific Islander91%
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income67%
Not low income85%
Special education83%
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White99%
Low income100%
Not low income99%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students41%
Female45%
Male35%
Black13%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income23%
Not low income59%
Special educationn/a
Not special education51%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students80%
Female76%
Male85%
Black55%
Asian73%
Asian/Pacific Islander71%
Hispanic76%
Multiracial80%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income57%
Not low income91%
Special education70%
Not special education83%
Limited English25%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students84%
Female86%
Male82%
Black84%
Asian82%
Asian/Pacific Islander83%
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income74%
Not low income89%
Special education86%
Not special education83%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students31%
Female20%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education31%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students69%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

233 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

250 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

251 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
54%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

237 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students87%
Female87%
Male86%
Black69%
Asian76%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic86%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income73%
Not low income93%
Special education67%
Not special education91%
Limited English17%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students89%
Female90%
Male88%
Black73%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander87%
Hispanic86%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income79%
Not low income94%
Special education68%
Not special education94%
Limited English36%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 60%
Black 15% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 14% 7%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 13%N/A8%
Special education 115%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 230%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 10N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 68%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

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10750 30 Av NE
Seattle, WA 98125
Phone: (206) 252-3680

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