Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Roosevelt High School

Public | 9-12

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

18 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted April 24, 2014

This is my son's first year at Roosevelt and I've been very impressed with his teachers, his counselor, his coaches and the staff in the offices are friendly and open to questions that we have as new HS parents. My son is really happy here, doing well academically and in sports. I'm also really pleased to say that he's also enjoying drama and marketing classes that they offer - all of which support a well rounded education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2014

As a brand new student at Roosevelt, it was extremely difficult for me to make friends and find my place. People are polite but distant and exclusive, which makes for a rough year if you aren't from Seattle. Of the five other people I know who have moved to Roosevelt from a different state or country, every single one of them had an AWFUL first year, and two went through phases of depression. However, the second year is always better. On the up side, the music and drama programs are EXCELLENT and there are many great opportunities at Roosevelt such as the Hands for Bridge program etc.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 4, 2013

This is a great school if you want your children to have easy access to drugs and alcohol at and around school. This school has the highest official use in the district and the official numbers are low! A permissive admistration and the relative afluence of the student population make this school a favorite for dealers. Roosevelt high test scores are misleading as their is a sizeable percentage of the student population that were simply not included in the numbers. I am not sure why but the district was allowed to leave certain low performing populations of students out when they comiled their official performance statistics. Unless you have a lot of personal resources and time to commit to your children's education this school is a poor choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2010

Overall, I love Roosevelt. The workload is not that bad. There is a lot of work, but coming from a rigorous private school, the workload is simply average. It is difficult for high level students to be challenged in the normal classes, however, AP/honors classes are challenging, and as a freshman, I was able to jump into more difficult classes usually taken by Sophomores. The teacher level is shockingly irregular, but it is easy to 'work the system' and get into better classes. Self-advocacy is very important. I was able to get out of the pointless 'required' freshman science class and take Biology a year early. Most students didn't choose this option simply because they were told it was impossible not to take. The orchestra, jazz and drama programs are fantastic. I highly reccomend this school if (and only if) one gets involved in these programs or a fall no-cut sport.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 26, 2009

I started at Roosevelt after attending private school and I loved it! There is something for everyone. There are so many clubs. activities, and different class choices. However, sports can be really competitive so I suggest playing a no-cut sport like swimming, cross-country, or lacrosse. Also, the academics, especially the sciences, aren't that great either. However, you can take running start or AP classes if you need a challenge.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 29, 2009

Roosevelt is a good solid B for academics and meets the needs of most students, especially if you're in the middle of the 'bell-curve' for achievement. However, with the exception of their great Autism program, the special education department lags years behind other schools nationwide using out-dated procedures for identification, placing students into 'restrictive programs'' and they don't measure quantifiable student progress. Additionally, there is little challenge for the highly motivated and gifted students who are forced to sit through classes where they have already know/mastered the content with busy-work as homework. Roosevelt's course rigor is not for developing high-level critical thinking skills, but focuses on mediocrity by how many worksheets and pencil-to-paper tasks can be completed daily. This leaves students with impossible choice between 'doing a great job' on the assignments with not enough time or 'putting half the effort' into just getting it done. Teacher quality is highly inconsistent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2008

This school is not for everyone. The drama program may be great, but it is the most competitive and the teachers do not give everyone a chance. Some RHS teachers are great, while others are awful. Warning for incoming freshmen, this school has a huge work load and some teachers are not all that nice.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 3, 2008

Great school continues to meet the needs of all students; gifted and those student's who needs extra help in L.A and History The teachers appeares to care and are willing to work with the students. Occasionally they need to be reminmded that somne studenmts do need extra help epecially if the students currently have an I.E.P. So parents stay on top of your child needs. I give the L.A and History a B- It is a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2007

I am satisfied with Roosevelt, its a good school with a great drama program and band program. But the teachers arent great, and it feels like it would be hard to get into a great college, after attending rhs.


Posted September 29, 2006

rooesvelt high school is one of the best in the state and a lot of people know this school. they also focus on the ones need improvments not EVERYONE. i would recommend a different school for any present 8th graders
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 16, 2006

I was impressed with the Language Arts department. I took the time to sit in on several classes and found the quality of instruction to be quite impressive. The school has an award winning newspaper. By reputation it has an excellent jazz program. It also provides students with relevant topics for their assemblies.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2006

Roosevelt's renovation project will leave it even better than before. It has great music and drama programs as well. Counselors are very busy so they dont get to satisfy everyone and teachers are so so.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 30, 2004

Roosevelt High School is heading in the wrong direction in focusing on 'small learning communities'. Somehow by eliminating A.P. and honors courses the school feels it can improve.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2004

Roosevelt is one of the grestest schools in this country. It is not a place to study, but it is a place to fit in the challeging world. The great spirit of its foundation has shined and paved to path to every student to succeed in life. As a graduated senior (class of 2004), I think it is the best school of all time, and I will always remember and proud to be a Roughrider!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 7, 2004

I wish I had sent my daughter to Garfield. She had an awful time fitting in at Roosevelt. The students at the school are exclusive. The academics did not challenge her at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2004

Great school that is meeting the needs of all students; gifted and challenged. I respect the knowledgeable, caring teachers and applaud their efforts to 'transform.' This school is moving forward!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2004

My son is finishing his Sr. year of four years spent at RHS. RHS has prepared him for college with committed teachers in honors and AP classes. The school is always studying ways to improve. Great Orchestra/Band and Drama program and provides many opportunities for extra involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2004

This school is not interested in bright or gifted children. Teachers generally address the needs of children who are struggling but they have no interest in providing challenges to their better students. Honors courses in English and History were eliminated for freshman this year. Head counselor is mean spirited and should be replaced.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
75%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

191 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
94%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
47%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
85%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
74%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
53%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students77%
Female82%
Male72%
Black36%
Asian77%
Asian/Pacific Islander77%
Hispanic68%
Multiracial73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income54%
Not low income85%
Special education73%
Not special education78%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students98%
Female99%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic92%
Multiracial100%
White98%
Low incomen/a
Not low income98%
Not special education98%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students35%
Femalen/a
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Low income35%
Not low income35%
Special education17%
Not special education56%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students87%
Female85%
Male88%
Black63%
Asian86%
Asian/Pacific Islander86%
Hispanic64%
Multiracial86%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income64%
Not low income90%
Special education68%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students84%
Female76%
Male92%
Black36%
Asian78%
Asian/Pacific Islander78%
Hispanic64%
Multiracial93%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income52%
Not low income89%
Special education71%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students54%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education54%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students56%
Female46%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income40%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

354 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

373 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

365 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
65%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

378 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students94%
Female95%
Male95%
Black79%
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic93%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income77%
Not low income97%
Special education78%
Not special education96%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female97%
Male93%
Black83%
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic89%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income76%
Not low income97%
Special education78%
Not special education97%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 62% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 18% 7%
Black 9% 5%
Hispanic 8% 20%
Two or more races 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 18%N/A8%
Special education 110%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 220%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 21N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 71%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
Dance teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Industrial shop
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Brian Vance

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Power lifting / Weight lifting
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Water polo
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1410 NE 66 St
Seattle, WA 98115
Phone: (206) 252-4810

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Hawthorn Schools
Seattle, WA



University Prep
Seattle, WA



Dartmoor School
Seattle, WA



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT