Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

West Seattle High School

Public | 9-12 | 995 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

14 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted May 24, 2013

The school is great and there are many courses for students to take! Sadly, I feel like there aren't as many clubs as other schools that I have seen.


Posted November 21, 2012

West Seattle High School is a pretty good school and the teachers are great teachers too!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2011

Many students have attitudes and disrespectful attitudes to other students or teachers. Many hood rats inside of this school, such as: graffiti in school bathrooms, etc ..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2009

West Seattle High School is a great school with a bunch of Great Kids!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

It is the best diversified school in Seattle


Posted April 2, 2009

I'm a sophomore at WSHS & I love it, to be honest :) I was hesitant to go here at first, but I've learned to love it. I hated it last year but that was because of personal problems & for that, I can't blame the school. They have great extracurricular avtivites & clubs. There's TATU, FCCLA, National Honor Society, Earthcrops, & many more. Some students doesn't like it here because it's 'boring', but that's because there are rarely any more fights or drama. Is that what school is about? No, it's about the education. It's very diverse and the education is great. Although some classes get out of hand, it's still great because the teachers know how to handle it. There are some students & teachers that need to leave the school but overall, I love this school :)
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 28, 2008

I do not agree. WSHS is at the lower middle in terms of achievment. One of mine opted for WSHS the other Kennedy... the rigors of the latter were far tougher than WSHS. It is a better social enviornment, but that is not where I prefer to send my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2008

Bruce Bivins tenure at West Seattle High School has been exemplary. Faced with a new position and a daunting task of reforming the entire academic format and cirriculum at Carla Santorno's mandate (transition from the 4 period day to the 6 period day) has not phased him. He has been a very strong, effective and insprirational leader. We are so lucky to have him. He is what is great about public education, tireless, dedicated, professional and manages to be charismatic and respectful at the same time. Bruce Bivins introduction to West Seattle High School for this school year of 2007-2008 has been a blessing and I pray we can keep him forever. He is a fabulous role model for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2007

As a teacher in one of the premier private highschools in Seattle, and parent of a son who is graduating from WSHS, let me tell you that the quality of staff at WSHS is no different than the quality of staff in the private sector. I am very happy that we chose to enter our son into public school. I truly believe that other than the academic education, he learned to function in a highly diverse environment and carve out his space. There will be a new principal this year, hopefully one with passion and leadership skills, someone who can gain the faculty's respect.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2007

I am currently a student at WSHS and after reading some of the reviews, some of them are definately not true. The teachers and counseling staff do care about our success at school. They do a great job of keeping us on track with our credits. I don't believe that WSHS is a terrible school as some people have described it to be. I have been a straight A student all through school and I know now that i am taking honors classes its going to be very difficult to keep my 4.0 GPA. WSHS is actually a great school for kids who want to be there and who want to do well in school, so if your child is doing bad at WSHS, its not the teachers or staffs fault its your son or daughters and partially your fault as a parent. Dont blame the school. thanks =)
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 19, 2007

My daughter graduated from West Seattle High School in 2005. I was very pleased with her education overall. She had teachers who truly cared about her and encouraged her, allowing her to graduate on-time with her class even though she had fallen behind in credits during her freshman year. I feel the administrative leadership has declined, however, with the change in principals a few years ago. The previous principal, who was moved to Ballard High School, was excellent. I only wish he had been able to stay at WSHS. Overall, this is a strong high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2007

Our student had the opportunity to go to a private school but we chose to give WSHS a chance. We have regretted our decision! The 'Source' is optional and so far we have found that the teachers do not post assignments that are due. I sat in on one of my sons classes and was amazed at all the disruptions in class (water bottles being thrown, cell phones being used and talking). Know wander my son has difficulties focusing in class. The teachers have to many students! The anterooms Principal and Vice Principal are wonderful! Wish we could keep them. I guess you pay for what you get. Go Private!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2005

From what I have seen from WSHS, the teachers and couselors have little to no interest in the seuccess of the children they teach. I feel that WSHS being on the School Choice option list has harmed this school. WSHS is in a good neighborhood and families that live in the area are middle to upper middle class families.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

I'm not a parent, but a student at WS. I just wanted to comment on 'Internet Access 2002-2003 '100% of classrooms in this school have computers that are connected to the Internet.' Although every classroom is wired to the internet does not mean there are computers in there for student use. Several classrooms don't have computers in them other than one for teacher use.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 54% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
37%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 82% in 2013.

242 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 93% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
69%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 53% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 96% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 22% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
22%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 66% in 2013.

215 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
59%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 72% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
39%
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 28% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 61% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 19% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 35% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 35% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 23% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 15% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 34% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 20% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 18% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students67%
Female65%
Male69%
Black52%
Asian71%
Asian/Pacific Islander73%
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income53%
Not low income78%
Special education58%
Not special education69%
Limited English33%
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students78%
Female78%
Male78%
Black54%
Asian65%
Asian/Pacific Islander63%
Hispanic57%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income59%
Not low income89%
Special education66%
Not special education81%
Limited English8%
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students99%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White98%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Not special education99%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students18%
Female22%
Male13%
Black5%
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White28%
Low income3%
Not low income31%
Special educationn/a
Not special education23%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Students74%
Female75%
Male73%
Black47%
Asian72%
Asian/Pacific Islander68%
Hispanic69%
Multiracial73%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Low income62%
Not low income81%
Special education40%
Not special education79%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Geometry

All Students68%
Female65%
Male70%
Black61%
Asian71%
Asian/Pacific Islander71%
Hispanic72%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income72%
Not low income65%
Special educationn/a
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students14%
Female8%
Male19%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Low income13%
Not low income15%
Special educationn/a
Not special education15%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Geometry

All Students18%
Female20%
Male17%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low income15%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education19%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Malen/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2010.

241 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
34%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 84% in 2013.

222 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 50% in 2011.

190 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
36%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 85% in 2013.

213 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Reading

All Students86%
Female92%
Male80%
Black64%
Asian90%
Asian/Pacific Islander90%
Hispanic84%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income78%
Not low income91%
Special education63%
Not special education89%
Limited English50%
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students86%
Female89%
Male84%
Black63%
Asian95%
Asian/Pacific Islander95%
Hispanic93%
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income79%
Not low income91%
Special education67%
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) to test students in reading and writing in grade 10. Math skills are tested by the End-of-Course (EOC) exams. The HSPE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 39% 60%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 21% 7%
Black 18% 5%
Hispanic 14% 20%
Two or more races 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 110%N/A8%
Special education 113%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 244%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 20N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 14N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 67%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3000 California Av SW
Seattle, WA 98116
Phone: (206) 252-8800

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools



Career Link
Seattle, WA





ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT