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GreatSchools Rating

Catharine Blaine K-8

Public | K-8 | 55 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted August 3, 2013

I love Blaine elementary. What sticks out in my mind about Blaine is how the school helped my son when he was going through a difficult time. They really cared about his social development and happiness. Particularly, the guidance counselor worked with him throughout the year and provided support that I would never have expected from a public school (particularly given all the budget cuts). It was outstanding. Blaine is a great place for children to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2012

This school is the best school ever . Every day i walked in to school the princable was there greating every one with a smile . Altho I no longer go to this school my to best friends are still there they are now fith graders Abby and Olivia.This school will alwayes be my favorite school.


Posted November 29, 2010

Despite living only a block away, we pulled our two youngest kids out of this school due to the behavior of teachers and administration. They were inflexible, autocratic, refused to communicate in any way other than e-mail (which we had told them was not a reliable way to contact us) and made changes to our son's education plan without our consent or knowledge. We eventually had to go through the courts to get any remedy. Home schooling is preferable to this place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2010

I have 2 young kids in the school and I am there every day. And I see that Heather Swanson, Catharine Blaine's principal is in the hall way EVERY morning and EVERY afternoon. She knows many of her students names and she also knows many parents. She responds to parents emails and she is creative in finding solutions to any problems in the class rooms. She cares deeply about the students. She even lets the kids dunk her in a dunking booth at a school carnival/fundraiser. Many parents have responded to her leadership and now parental involvement in the school is very high. Every single day there is a parent in my son's class for at least part of the day. My kids and I have found the school very warm. The older kids look after the younger ones. My kids love it. And they are learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2010

This school has the potential to be a great school, but sadly falls short. Many of the teachers are good but they operate on their own. No real benefit to having a child transtion through from elementary to middle school. Lack of consistency and standards makes the middle school particularly challenging. Principal is not accessible and faculty is not responsiive in a way one would expect from a small K-8 school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2009

We have two children at this school. Many, many good things to say about this school. Love the new principal who previously was the assistant principal. Strong academics, arts and extracurricular offerings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2008

I am a kindergarten Blaine mom. Because the Magnolia/Queen Anne cluster has excellent schools Blaine offers slots for children from other neighborhoods. Our local school is under performing, so we drive from south Central District to Blaine. We love our teacher. She was previously in special ed , is excellent with all achievement levels, awesome with squirmy boys and positive. The principal is very accessible, available every morning in the hallway. The PTSA is committed to supporting Blaine. There are many optional fund raisers, which can get expensive, but provide curricular support. This school teaches at the level our child needs. In contrast our local school, which faces many challenges. Great fieldtrips, lots of take home activities (which do take commitment) and friendly kids/parents. We have been impressed by the positive behavior and assuredness of the older students at Blaine. The after school program is excellent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2008

we love Catharine Blaine! This will be our family's 4th year at Blaine, after we transferred here from Coe. Every teacher we have had at Blaine has been fantastic. I feel like they are aware of how my kids are doing and work hard to make sure they understand and meet my kids' needs. The parent community here is unmatched -- everyone is really involved in the school, whether by helping in the classrooms, working on fundraisers, or weeding the flower beds. I felt instantly welcomed when we moved here and was surprised by how easy it was to fit in. The leadership at Blaine has had a history of high turnover, but the current principal is a strong leader and relates especially well to the middle school kids. I also love the K-8 aspect of this school. The older kids are great leaders and really kind to the little ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2007

I have been a parent at Catharine Blaine for 7 years. We have been blessed with excellent teachers who care deeply about the academic abilities of all students. They are also very connected to the parent community at this school. My children are challenged academically and have participated in several Advanced Learning Options. We have a very dedicated and effective PTA and due to their hard work the students are able to enjoy art and music. It is however sad that this has to be provided out of private monies Catharine Blaine however has had a few rough years where a prior principal in her two year tenure dismantled the art and music program and demoralized the teachers. Thanks to the powerful supportive parent/teacher community our school is back on track and parents, teachers and students are much happier. I look forward to spending many more years at Catharine Blaine
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2007

I have been involved at this school for the past 7 years with more than one child. We have had some ups and downs, but nothing bad enough where a little work and communication couldn't set things right. The quality of teachers are top notch, they care deeply about the academic needs of all the students. They provide a safe structured fun filled learning environment for these kids. We have had numerous principal turnover, but in my mind this is a fault of the district i.e Seattle Public Schools, not the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2006

My kids have been at Blaine for 6 years, during which we have had mostly excellent teachers, but no great principal. The environment is safe, the parents are great, and the teachers are commited, but we're all burned out with the 'career-minded' principals who come to our school to build. My kids are bright/normal, and their teachers have tried their best to challenge them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2006

Due to the tireless efforts of the PTA group, Blaine has managed to provide music & art, chess club & many other clubs & programs that have been lost in the public Seattle Schools. The leadership of the school however seems disjointed. The school has it's 3rd principal in 5 years, and classroom staffing keeps changing. The building is also in a much needed state of refurbishment. But, also due to the financial crisis of the Seattle School district, this too will have to wait.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2006

We are not that happy this year. The school is disorganized, and leadership is constantly changing. Music and art are very low on the priority list, and that is so sad for my kids. Parent involvement is high, and I feel that with the right principal, this could be a great neighborhood school. We have been very disapointed, and I know many parents who are switching schools for next year. I would also add that we loved our teachers this year, but their is not a good program for ALP kids and I feel the teachers are extremely frustrated with the principals leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2006

The principal does not use good decision making method. Parents and teachers are shut out of decision making process. Test scores down! No options for advanced learners, although they tell you there are! Be sure to ask about the reading program. They have two in place, one in K and 3rd another in 1st. They promote it as a 'balanced reading program.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2006

There have been a lot of program changes in the last year with the new leadership. Moving away from grouping by skill set in reading and math. Advanced students cannot progress at their capability. The 'advanced learning options' program is very weak.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2005

Catharine Blaine k-8 is a great neighborbood school that allows kids to stay close to home for middle school. The teachers are all very responsive to parents and warm to the students. As a small middle school, 60 student per grade, there is not a lot of extras such a band, electives and honors classes. For these things you must choose McClure or Whitman. But this school is still a great option for many types of students. Leadership has changed about every 2-3 years for the past six or so years and many programs have been started then dropped. As a result, the school is lacking in program continutity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2005

I am a former student of Catharine Blaine. I have lived in Magnolia all of my life, the suburban community that draws from the diverse communities of Seattle. Every aspect of each class is constructed to make learning comprehensible, memorable, revolutionary, and fun. It is not the typical learn by the text book school, but it is not a new age phenomenon. It is a good education, taught by qualified, committed instructors who wish to see their students perform wonderfully. Recently, a friend who still attends Blaine, worked with his classmates to raise money to fund a marine biology trip to Hawaii. It was student run, student motivated, and regardless of monetary status, the kids worked together to raise money outside of the home, so as not to financially burden anyone. I applaud Blaine for the wonderful education they gift each student with. Keep up the good work!
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
47%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
68%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students87%
Female81%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income89%
Special education70%
Not special education90%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female86%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low incomen/a
Not low income91%
Special education60%
Not special education93%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students89%
Female86%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Special education64%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special education100%
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students80%
Female86%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low incomen/a
Not low income81%
Special education73%
Not special education81%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students62%
Female53%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Low income40%
Not low income70%
Special education20%
Not special education71%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female80%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income67%
Not low income88%
Special education70%
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students81%
Female77%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income53%
Not low income91%
Special education50%
Not special education88%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students84%
Female88%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low incomen/a
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education85%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female94%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students86%
Female96%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Not low income90%
Special education64%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female100%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income94%
Special education73%
Not special education92%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students95%
Female96%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Special education73%
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female85%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income73%
Not low income83%
Special educationn/a
Not special education89%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female90%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income73%
Not low income88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education91%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students92%
Female90%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income82%
Not low income95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 60%
Two or more races 10% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 7%
Hispanic 7% 20%
Black 3% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 10%N/A8%
Special education 113%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 214%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 18N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 6N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 70%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Heather Swanson

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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2550 34 Av West
Seattle, WA 98199
Phone: (206) 252-1920

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