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GreatSchools Rating

Pinehurst K-8 School

Public | PK-8 | 180 students

We are best known for experiential learning.

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2014

I have been here my whole life. I started in kindergarten and stayed until eighth grade. It is a school where everybody has a voice and anybody can be who they want to be. It has always been under budgeted and has made up with their friendly community. I have learned so much here. Because of my math teacher I got a better math MSP score than 95% of the eighth grade students in seattle schools. Pinehurst is a school that everybody loves. I've never had so much fun at school.


Posted June 3, 2013

I only went there for a year, but I found that I really liked this school. If you do better in a smaller environment then this is the school for you. I found myself able to attend almost every day of school unless I was actually sick, whereas at my previous school I was "sick" at least once a week. In my experience the kids here are open to making new friends, as long as you are too. Now the teachers are amazing. I loved my teachers and I felt that I would be able to talk to them about assignments. This would be a pretty good school for someone with anxiety, but the students may have a hard time realizing that you want to talk with them, but you just have a really hard time doing so. This school is amazing for many reasons, and I found that kids aren't afraid to be themselves, they don't try to hide who they are, this is pretty rare at most schools.


Posted February 12, 2013

We love this school and all the teachers. My son is in kindergarten and he is thriving to learn new things every day. We really like the experiential learning approach and I think there are doing a great job at teaching respect, compassion and wonderful life learning technics. Just by looking at how the older kids in the school behave and interact make you see what a great school Pinehurst K8 is!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2012

Third year here and my kids love it. Secretary may be fancy but she loves the kids. Teachers are passionate and compassionate. Even the middle school kids seem happy! If you are tired of pretense and fashion shows taking precedence over substance and learning, this is the place for you and your kids
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2012

Small and heart-felt, this school has taken great care of my daughter over 6 years and she loves all the experiential learning opportunities. The staff work hard and are creative about teaching to all kinds of minds and guiding kids to good chocies.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2012

Because the school is so small, it is understaffed, and the staff at this school is not willing to work hard to see the needs of the students are met. No experiential learning, no alternative discipline.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2011

Our son started 1st grade here this year and we have been very pleased. The school feels is small and all the classrooms are mixed grade. The community of students and teachers seems tight-knit. There is also much more critical recess and P.E. time for young kids than at other public schools. The school is an alternative school, and tends to appeal to those trying to escape the "teach to the test" mentality of the mainstream public schools. I have heard that the school's low test scores are due in large part to certain parents who object to the "teach to the test" focus so strongly that they keep their children home on test days. The school district counts their absence as a zero, which greatly pulls down the remaining students scores. Certainly the test scores reported on this site do not seem to reflect the academic rigor that I am seeing in the school's curriculum, or the passion of it's teachers. My son loves school and he is making rapid academic progress. Among the middle-school-aged kids there seems to be much excitement about their undefeated record this year in Ultimate Frisbee. And all the kids enjoy expert instruction in the use of school's climbing wall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 23, 2011

We have had two children attending Pinehurst K-8, and we are incredibly grateful for the creative approach to learning supported by the staff and community. Our children have been inspired to be intellectually courageous, caring, and confident learners. This school is a true gem which deserves a second look by those seeking an intimate public school with high academic standards, experiential learning, and a focus on compassion for others.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 16, 2011

What I love about this school, in addition to the things other parents describe, is that when you enter the building, you see kids of all races playing and eating lunch together. This school really "gets" anti-racism. This is a great feature for everyone, but particularly important to me as the parent of a biracial child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2011

Our daughter loves learning! Pinehurst K-8's teacher's approach to education deserve much credit in providing strong academic standards coupled with nurturing our daughter's interests, in academics, athletics, and the arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2011

I love this school - the children learn through interdisciplinary projects using multiple learning modes, not just sitting/lecturing/reading. Kids learn critical thinking early, get good exposure to environmental and social justice issues, and much of the staff has had Undoing Institutional Racism training.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2011

This school provides a viable alternative to traditional public schools in the area. We are small with an engaged parent community and kids that truly care and are connected to their school community. Our kids ENJOY coming to school, their views are respected, their interests are nurtured, all kinds of minds are welcome! Our test scores reflect the fact that our teachers don't cater their classrooms towards improving test scores, but teach kids how to be lifelong learners-knowledge beyond a standardized test!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2010

(Pinehurst) K-8, rate this school in Teacher Quality, friendliness, respect, and challenging academic programs. Strong prncipals and fairness.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

This is the only public school I know of that really allows students to develop their passion for learning. Students have the freedom to pursue what interests them and they also are encouraged to be good community members. We also really appreciate the schools focus on social justice and experiential education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

My kids have learned to be free and independent critical thinkers at AS#1. They have been allowed to learn that education is a life-long process, and that learning doesn't have to happen in a classroom all the time.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

AS #1 is a great community, alternative education for those who thrive in a community model. It was Seattle's 1st alternative school, is a rich part of our history in Seattle. Children are supported in their emotional development, they are encouraged to be active members of a community, to mentor younger kids, to work cooperatively, and to pursue whatever they are interested in. There is an 'anti-racist' library. The kids are a part of a group to 'end institutional racism at AS#1' and there is even a 'forum' which is an alternative model for ending disputes among children which allows each child to speak, be heard, and have a community resolution to personal conflicts. Parents can also be involved at the school, helping to teach languages, drama, etc. This school is awesome and produces active community members, future world changers, world leaders, and self aware and self assured youth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

I think AS#1(Pinehurst) K-8) is the best public school in the country because children are allowed to be who they are so that they can learn. I love the strong commitment to social justice and to anti-racist education, led by the school's Equity Committee and infused throughout the school. It's a small school with small multi-age classes, which allows for the experiential learning that has been a hallmark of the school since its inception. Kids don't just do research in books or in the library, they are out in the community examining things firsthand. My child would probably do fine in any school, but she is absolutely thriving and blossoming in this environment where she is treated with respect, and where she can get the individual attention all kids benefit from. We previously thought this would be impossible to find unless we were willing to pay high private school fees and put our child in a less than diverse environment. But although AS#1 is a public school and routinely struggles to find enough resources, the commitment of the staff and the families to AS#1's progressive model of education allows the good work to continue year after year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

It's place where kids, parents, and teachers all work together to make a happy, safe learning environment! Everybody has a voice!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Focus on social justice and helping kids meet their unique potential!


Posted September 16, 2009

Our first year here and so far it is great! Friendly, sincere, genuine, open minded, talented, happy children and teachers!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
23%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
70%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

15 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
25%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
63%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 53% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 65% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education40%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students42%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education50%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students57%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students54%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students53%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education64%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students73%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students39%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income40%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education46%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income70%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education82%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female67%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income46%
Not low income77%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female67%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income55%
Not low income71%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Writing

All Students68%
Female73%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low income73%
Not low income65%
Special educationn/a
Not special education77%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Math

All Students43%
Femalen/a
Male42%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Low income33%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education53%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Femalen/a
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income58%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students57%
Femalen/a
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Low income50%
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special education67%
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, in writing in grades 4 and 7, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The MSP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 94% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 100% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math I

The state average for Integrated Math I was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Integrated Math II

The state average for Integrated Math II was 99% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited Englishn/a
Migrantn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Low incomen/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a

Integrated Math II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Asiann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Not low incomen/a
Not special educationn/a
Scale: % basic, level 3, or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Washington used End-of-Course (EOC) examinations to assess students in Algebra I, Geometry, Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Washington. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 53% 60%
Hispanic 15% 20%
Black 13% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 7%
Two or more races 7% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Transitional bilingual 11%N/A8%
Special education 116%N/A13%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 245%N/A44%
Source: 1 WA OSPI, 2009-2010
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student-teacher ratio

  This school District averageState average
Students per classroom teacher 14N/A17
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Average years educational experience 12N/A12
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree or higher 50%N/A66%
Source: WA OSPI, 2009-2010

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • "School of Distinction" (2009)
  • "School of Distinction" (2010)

Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Clubs
  • Gardening

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Clubs
  • Yearbook

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Clubs
  • Gardening
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Roy Merca
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Is there an application process?
  • No
Fax number
  • (206) 252-4601

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Core knowledge
  • Independent Study
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Garden
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Playground
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Ultimate Frisbee
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Gardening
  • Yearbook
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.
 

How to apply

Does this school have an application or enrollment process?
 

No

Planning Ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Neighborhood High Schools
NOVA
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

11530 12 Av NE
Seattle, WA 98125
Website: Click here
Phone: (206) 252-4600

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